• Mutational and Structural Analysis of KIR3DL1 Reveals a Lineage-Defining Allotypic Dimorphism That Impacts Both HLA and Peptide Sensitivity

      O'Connor, Geraldine M.; Vivian, Julian P.; Widjaja, Jacqueline M.; Bridgeman, John S.; Gostick, Emma; Lafont, Bernard A.; Anderson, Stephen K.; Price, David A.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Rossjohn, Jamie; et al. (American Association of Immunologists, 2014-03-15)
      Killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) control the activation of human NK cells via interactions with peptide-laden HLAs. KIR3DL1 is a highly polymorphic inhibitory receptor that recognizes a diverse array of HLA molecules expressing the Bw4 epitope, a group with multiple polymorphisms incorporating variants within the Bw4 motif. Genetic studies suggest that KIR3DL1 variation has functional significance in several disease states, including HIV infection. However, owing to differences across KIR3DL1 allotypes, HLA-Bw4, and associated peptides, the mechanistic link with biological outcome remains unclear. In this study, we elucidated the impact of KIR3DL1 polymorphism on peptide-laden HLA recognition. Mutational analysis revealed that KIR residues involved in water-mediated contacts with the HLA-presented peptide influence peptide binding specificity. In particular, residue 282 (glutamate) in the D2 domain underpins the lack of tolerance of negatively charged C-terminal peptide residues. Allotypic KIR3DL1 variants, defined by neighboring residue 283, displayed differential sensitivities to HLA-bound peptide, including the variable HLA-B*57:01-restricted HIV-1 Gag-derived epitope TW10. Residue 283, which has undergone positive selection during the evolution of human KIRs, also played a central role in Bw4 subtype recognition by KIR3DL1. Collectively, our findings uncover a common molecular regulator that controls HLA and peptide discrimination without participating directly in peptide-laden HLA interactions. Furthermore, they provide insight into the mechanics of interaction and generate simple, easily assessed criteria for the definition of KIR3DL1 functional groupings that will be relevant in many clinical applications, including bone marrow transplantation.
    • Peptide-Dependent Recognition of HLA-B*57:01 by KIR3DS1

      O'Connor, Geraldine M.; Vivian, Julian P.; Gostick, Emma; Pymm, Phillip; Lafont, Bernard A.; Price, David A.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Brooks, Andrew G.; McVicar, Daniel W.; Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, Maryland, USA. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia. Institute of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom. Non-Human Primate Immunogenetics and Cellular Immunology Unit, Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Institute of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom Human Immunology Section, Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia Institute of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. (American Society for Microbiology, 2015-04-21)
      Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) play an important role in the activation of natural killer (NK) cells, which in turn contribute to the effective immune control of many viral infections. In the context of HIV infection, the closely related KIR3DL1 and KIR3DS1 molecules, in particular, have been associated with disease outcome. Inhibitory signals via KIR3DL1 are disrupted by downregulation of HLA class I ligands on the infected cell surface and can also be impacted by changes in the presented peptide repertoire. In contrast, the activatory ligands for KIR3DS1 remain obscure. We used a structure-driven approach to define the characteristics of HLA class I-restricted peptides that interact with KIR3DL1 and KIR3DS1. In the case of HLAB*57:01, we used this knowledge to identify bona fide HIV-derived peptide epitopes with similar properties. Two such peptides facilitated productive interactions between HLA-B*57:01 and KIR3DS1. These data reveal the presence of KIR3DS1 ligands within the HIV-specific peptide repertoire presented by a protective HLA class I allotype, thereby enhancing our mechanistic understanding of the processes that enable NK cells to impact disease outcome.