• Communities and neighbourhoods

      Vaandrager, Lenneke; Kennedy, Lynne; Wageningen University and University of Chester (Springer, 2016-09-07)
      Summary There is growing consensus that the places where people live and the various social processes, relationships and psycho-social concepts associated with strong healthy communities and neighbourhoods make an important contribution to health. Where you live makes a considerable difference; people living in more affluent communities for example are more likely to experience better self-reported health and wellbeing. This is particularly evident in current theoretical and policy debates concerning the salutogenic and so-called strength or assets based approach to health; healthy communities have various social and physical resources available, which if they can recognise, share and utilise, can result in stronger SOC, increasing their ability to cope and thrive. Within health promotion we actively encourage communities to organise themselves for better health and well-being. The concept of ‘community’ is both complex and subjective and difficult to define. So we start by conceptualising the definitions, dimensions and meanings of community – beyond a physical location - underpinning this chapter. There are several ideas linking the community or neighbourhood as a setting, including community as a place to live, connectedness (social capital) and social action (the development of a strong SOC). The evidence is variable in quality and furthermore, few studies explicitly apply the theory of salutogenesis when they study health and wellbeing in the community context. The body of this chapter is devoted therefore to summarising the available research about salutogenic and asset-based community interventions, drawing upon examples from empirical work. In doing so, we will highlight debates emerging around the concepts of a salutogenic framework and health assets in relation to community and neighbourhood. As such, we are specifically interested in examining the resources (and/or assets) of communities and neighbourhoods and the associated processes enabling these resources to be accessed for the benefit of the community’s health and wellbeing.
    • Death by effectiveness: exercise as medicine caught in the efficacy trap!

      Beedie, Chris; Mann, Steven; Jimenez, Alfonso; Kennedy, Lynne; Lane, Andrew M.; Domone, Sarah; Wilson, Stephen; Whyte, Greg; Aberystwyth University; ukactive Research Institute; Universidad Europea; University of Chester; University of Wolverhampton; Liverpool John Moores University (BMJ Publishing Group, 2015-02-12)
      Sport and Exercise Medicine (SEM) has had a good run. For a while it was the low-cost magic bullet. With efficacy demonstrated in study after study, the conclusion was clear: ‘Exercise is Medicine’, a potential public health panacea. Sadly, the early promise waned. While we continue to be bombarded by original research and reviews extoling the efficacy of exercise, there is an apparent dearth of evidence of its effectiveness. This fact is highlighted in 2014 reports from the UK Government1 and Public Health England.2
    • Eating for 1, Healthy and Active for 2; feasibility of delivering novel, compact training for midwives to build knowledge and confidence in giving nutrition, physical activity and weight management advice during pregnancy

      Basu, Andrea J.; Kennedy, Lynne; Tocque, Karen; Jones, Sharn; University of Chester; Wrexham Maelor Hospital (BioMed Central, 2014-07-04)
      Background: Women in Wales are more likely to be obese in pregnancy than in any other United Kingdom (UK) country. Midwives are ideally placed to explore nutrition, physical activity and weight management concerns however qualitative studies indicate they lack confidence in raising the sensitive issue of weight. Acknowledging this and the reality of finite time and resources, this study aimed to deliver compact training on nutrition, physical activity and weight management during pregnancy to increase the knowledge and confidence of midwives in this subject. Methods A compact training package for midwives was developed comprising of evidence based nutrition, physical activity and weight management guidance for pregnancy. Training was promoted via midwifery leads and delivered within the Health Board. Questionnaires based on statements from national public health guidance were used to assess changes in self-reported knowledge and confidence pre and post training. Descriptive statistics were applied and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results 43 midwives registered for training, 32 (74%) attended and completed the questionnaires. Although, pre training knowledge and confidence varied between participants, statistically significant improvements in self-reported knowledge and confidence were observed post training. 97% indicated knowledge of pregnancy specific food and nutrition messages as ‘better’ (95% CI 85 to 100), as opposed to 3% stating ‘stayed the same’ – 60% stated ‘much better’. 83% indicated confidence to explain the risks of raised BMI in pregnancy was either ‘much’ or ‘somewhat better’ (95% CI 66 to 93), as opposed to 17% stating ‘stayed the same’. 89% indicated confidence to discuss eating habits and physical activity was ‘much’ or ‘somewhat better’ (95% CI 73 to 97) as opposed to 11% stating ‘stayed the same’. Emergent themes highlighted that training was positively received and relevant to midwifery practice. Conclusions This study provides early indications that a compact nutrition, physical activity and weight management training package improves midwives self-reported knowledge and confidence. Cascading training across the midwifery service in the Health Board and conducting further studies to elicit longer term impact on midwifery practice and patient outcomes are recommended.
    • The effects of intake of bread with treated corn bran inclusion on postprandial glycaemic response

      Cui, Zhiming; Li, Weili; Kennedy, Lynne; Department of Clinical Sciences and Nutrition, University of Chester (Informa, 2019-09-30)
      In the current study, corn bran was treated with hydrothermal processing and then incorporated into bread. The consumption of bread with inclusion of treated corn bran (TCB) and control bread (CB) on postprandial glycaemic response was investigated in a randomised crossover intervention trial with eleven healthy participants and one hyperglycaemicparticipant, capillary blood samples were measured at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105 and 120 minutes after consuming the bread. The results showed the baseline-adjusted peak value of postprandial blood glucose with consumption of CB, containing 75 g carbohydrate was 4.27 mmol/L at 60 min after meal, but with consumption of treated corn bran bread (TCBB), containing 75 g carbohydrate was 3.88 mmol/L at 45 min after meal. In addition, the postprandial blood glucose concentration with consumption of CB is consistently higher than that with the consumption of TCBB since the peak time to 120 min. However, there was no significant differences, in turn, the incremental area under the curves (IAUC) with baseline-adjusted for CB consumption is consistently higher than that of TCBB consumption, but not any significant difference either (p>0.05). However, it is interesting to notice that more considerable difference in rise of blood sugar at peak time and thereafter for hyperglycaemicparticipant between the consumptions of TCBB and CB. In conclusion, the consumption of bread with inclusion of TCB is able to reduce the postprandial glycaemic response to a lower level compared with the consumption of CB and the more obvious difference was observed with the hyperglycaemicparticipant and healthy group Key words: Corn bran, hydrothermal treatment, postprandial glycaemic response. Intervention trial.
    • Inequalities in dental health: An ecological analysis of the interaction between the effects of water fluoridation and social deprivation on tooth decay in children living in England

      Tocque, Karen; Kennedy, Lynne; University of Chester; KT Intelligence CIC (Academic Journals, 2015-07-31)
      Oral health in England has improved considerably in recent years but continues to show a strong inequalities gradient. This study was aimed at investigating variations in dental decay and elation to social deprivation and local water fluoridation. An ecological analysis using the 2007 and 2008 National Dental Epidemiology Programme survey of 5 year old children in England. Postcode of residence was mapped to census lower super output area (LSOA). LSOAs were assigned a national deprivation quintile and a fluoridation category based upon therapeutic level of 1 mg/L. Multiple logistic regression was applied to determine independent influences on tooth decay. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to investigate interactions between fluoridation and deprivation on the mean levels of dental caries. Analysis is based on 142,030 clinical dental examinations, representing 25% of estimated population of 5 year olds in England. Overall, 31% of children had at least one decayed missing or filled tooth (dmft). Multiple logistic regression showed that children living in the most deprived areas were three times more likely to experience tooth decay than those living in affluent areas; whereas children living in fluoridated areas were 1.5 times less likely to have dmft than those living in non-fluoridated areas. Therefore, although both are independently significant, living in the most deprived quintile of social deprivation doubled the impact on the likelihood of dental decay compared to non-fluoridation. ANCOVA showed a strong gradient of increasing mean dmft with increasing social deprivation in both water-fluoridated and non-fluoridated areas, with 3 times more dental decay in more deprived areas than in more affluent areas. In all deprivation quintiles, children living in fluoridated areas have significantly (p < 0.001) lower mean dmft than those living in equivalent deprivation with no water fluoridation. Fluoridated drinking water may moderate dental caries; however, socioeconomic deprivation has a stronger influence on dental decay than local fluoridation of water.
    • The low-risk perception of developing type 2 diabetes among women with a previous history of gestational diabetes: a qualitative study

      Sharma, Manisha; Purewal, Tejpal Singh; Fallows, Stephen; Kennedy, Lynne; Edge Hill University; Royal Liverpool Hospital; University of Chester (Wiley, 2019-02-12)
      We conducted a qualitative study to explore the risk perceptions, health beliefs and behaviours of women with a previous history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Women aged between 18 to 40 years (at the time of pregnancy) with a previous history of GDM, registered at The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, United Kingdom, participated in individual, semi-structured, face-to-face interviews. Qualitative data from seven participants were collected until data saturation and were analysed by thematic analysis. Participants had a low-risk perception of the future risk of developing diabetes. Some believed that their risk was the same as that of any other woman without a history of GDM, and some other participants were not aware of the risk at all and perceived GDM as a temporary health condition with no long-term risks. Participants showed some understanding of a healthy lifestyle in general. However, most of the information was self-acquired by participants and not linked to the future risk of developing diabetes. The findings of this research also indicated a contrast between the high perception of the immediate risks of complications during the pregnancy and low long-term risk of developing diabetes after pregnancy associated with GDM. Participants received healthy lifestyle advice during their pregnancy, but none of them reported involvement in any postnatal health education, intervention or counselling as recommended by 2008 and 2014 NICE guidelines. The low-risk perception impedes positive health behaviour required to overcome the barriers against a healthy lifestyle. This was a small research project but the findings warrant scope for more research in this field. A larger study might promote the development of a well-structured, long-term follow-up health intervention programme, incorporating a reminder system for annual diabetes screenings to improve the risk perception and reduce the risk for the development of type 2 diabetes in this population.
    • Qualitative Study of the Determinants of Food Choice of International Students and Its Associated Health Risk (P10-080-19).

      Nwaugochi, Ifeanyi; Kennedy, Lynne (2019-06-13)
      Migration to study in an industrialized country is an important time when unhealthy food choice behaviour among students reach its peak. This dietary pattern is linked to increased risk level of developing food-related chronic diseases (F-RCD). During this period, students tends to consume more ultra-processed diet (high in fat, sugar, & energy) and very low in fruits and vegetable. The main objective of this study was to explore the factors influencing food choice and dietary acculturation of international students using qualitative study design to explore their knowledge/perception on nutrition and the link between food, health and F-RCDs. Recent studies have shown dearth on determinants of food choice, dietary acculturation and its associated health challenges of international students. International students were recruited by purposive and snowball sampling through poster advert and international office of the University of Chester.Using an open-ended, semi-structured question guide, focus group interviews was carried out. Focus group data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using manual content analysis and inductive thematic approach.23 participants were recruited into the study comprising 13 undergraduate and 10 postgraduate students (12 males and 11 females) aged 18-25 years from Africa, Asian, and the Caribbean. Factors identified by most international students as being the main determining factor on their food choice includes residency status (as a full or semi-catered student), price, availability, accessibility (location of shop), preservation/storage temperature, UK weather conditions, structure of foods in the UK among others. The results presented here may facilitate the improvements of wellbeing of international students' by promoting healthy food choice, thereby encouraging positive acculturation of these students. This research was funded by the researcher.
    • Socio-economic causes of undernutrition

      Kennedy, Lynne; Woodall, Alison; University of Chester (John Wiley and Sons, 2018-01-26)
      In this chapter we explore the role of socio-economic factors in the development of under-nutrition in high-income countries, such as the UK, with particular reference to food access and nutrition inequality. For the purpose of this chapter we use the term under-nutrition to refer to the physiological effects of inadequate food supply resulting from the inability to access sufficient quantity and quality of food to meet recommended nutritional requirements; a situation otherwise termed food poverty or food insecurity (See Box 1 for definitions). In affluent societies, hunger and malnutrition coexist alongside obesity and diet-related diseases such as coronary heart disease and diabetes. Before the food system was industrialised in the mid-20th Century, people ate a basic, traditional diet of limited variety. Hunger and under nutrition was common. Today, food is both varied and widely available. Access to cheap, energy-dense and nutrient-poor food is linked with the so-called obesity epidemic and diseases of affluence. Despite this a growing number of people in societies such as the UK experience hunger or malnutrition because of limited access or availability to a nutritionally adequate diet (3, 4, and 5).