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dc.contributor.authorAdams, Jeff*
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-15T12:06:37Z
dc.date.available2016-04-15T12:06:37Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-17
dc.identifier.citationAdams, J. (2014) Finding Time to Make Mistakes. International Journal of Art and Design Education, 33(1), pp. 2-5. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-8070.2014.12040.xen
dc.identifier.issn1476-8070en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1476-8070.2014.12040.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/605441
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Adams, J. (2014) Finding Time to Make Mistakes. International Journal of Art and Design Education, 33(1), pp. 2-5, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-8070.2014.12040.x. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archivingen
dc.description.abstractThe place of the creative arts in the school curriculum is sometimes fiercely contested, but across the world they have enduring importance and there is a wide consensus over their value for general education. However, there has been a tendency of late to rely on an economic justification for their place in the curriculum. A key problem with this strategy is that many of the economic arguments may prove false, as was pointed out by Grayson Perry in one of his BBC Reith lectures, where he pointed out those studying arts subjects are often at the bottom of the economic table for future earnings potential. Grayson does go on to say, however, that this is should be a ‘cause for celebration’, since the enduring popularity of arts courses implies that people still want to go to study art despite the lack of an economic incentive, testament to the values of art education. This draws our attention to the nature of creative experimentation, of finding time to make mistakes, which is of great importance to pedagogy in the arts, reminding us of those other purposes of education that once seemed so fundamental, prior to onset of economic and market dogmas.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jade.2014.33.issue-1/issuetoc
dc.subjectCreative mistakes
dc.subjectarts practices
dc.subjectEconomic dogmas
dc.subjectArts pedagogy
dc.subjectvalue of education
dc.titleFinding Time to Make Mistakes
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.eissn1476-8070
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Art & Design Educationen
dc.date.accepted2013-12-17
or.grant.openaccessNoen
rioxxterms.funderxxen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectxxen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-04-15
html.description.abstractThe place of the creative arts in the school curriculum is sometimes fiercely contested, but across the world they have enduring importance and there is a wide consensus over their value for general education. However, there has been a tendency of late to rely on an economic justification for their place in the curriculum. A key problem with this strategy is that many of the economic arguments may prove false, as was pointed out by Grayson Perry in one of his BBC Reith lectures, where he pointed out those studying arts subjects are often at the bottom of the economic table for future earnings potential. Grayson does go on to say, however, that this is should be a ‘cause for celebration’, since the enduring popularity of arts courses implies that people still want to go to study art despite the lack of an economic incentive, testament to the values of art education. This draws our attention to the nature of creative experimentation, of finding time to make mistakes, which is of great importance to pedagogy in the arts, reminding us of those other purposes of education that once seemed so fundamental, prior to onset of economic and market dogmas.


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