Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAdams, Jeff*
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-07T11:43:46Z
dc.date.available2016-04-07T11:43:46Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-24
dc.identifier.citationAdams, J. (2016). The Question of Cost is Irrelevant. International Journal of Art and Design Education, 35(1), 4-7. DOI: 10.1111/jade.12103en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jade.12103
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/604711
dc.description.abstractHerbert Read’s belief in the fundamental importance of education to human culture and society, and with it the subordination of economics to state education, might sound extraordinary to us now. This is especially true for those of us in England defending the place of the arts in the education curriculum in an era of political thought defined by the ascendency of neoliberalism. What were once common philosophical ideals rooted in the confidence of an expanding democratic citizenship, might today be interpreted as profligacy, and the arts in education have become marginalised and subordinated under this malign influence in England. Mantras such as ‘value for money’ have become the condition of all practical and intellectual endeavour, and the creative imperatives of children, as well as those of us who practise as educators and artists, are suffering the consequences, the most damaging of which is our inadvertent complicity in the concept of the arts-as-service.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jade.12103/abstract
dc.subjectArts Education
dc.subjectNeoliberalism
dc.subjectEconomic cost
dc.subjectValue of the arts
dc.subjectLearning through art
dc.subjectHerbert Read
dc.titleThe Question of Cost is Irrelevant
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.eissn1476-8070
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Art & Design Educationen
dc.date.accepted2015-11-24
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderxxen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectxxen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-02-24
html.description.abstractHerbert Read’s belief in the fundamental importance of education to human culture and society, and with it the subordination of economics to state education, might sound extraordinary to us now. This is especially true for those of us in England defending the place of the arts in the education curriculum in an era of political thought defined by the ascendency of neoliberalism. What were once common philosophical ideals rooted in the confidence of an expanding democratic citizenship, might today be interpreted as profligacy, and the arts in education have become marginalised and subordinated under this malign influence in England. Mantras such as ‘value for money’ have become the condition of all practical and intellectual endeavour, and the creative imperatives of children, as well as those of us who practise as educators and artists, are suffering the consequences, the most damaging of which is our inadvertent complicity in the concept of the arts-as-service.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
AdamsQuestionOfCost.pdf
Size:
101Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record