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dc.contributor.authorEwence, Hannah*
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-04T13:15:56Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-04T13:15:56Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationEwence, H. (2015). 'Hands across the tea': Renegotiating Jewish Identity and Belonging in Post-war Britain. In M. Diemling & L. Ray (Eds.), Boundaries, Identity and Belonging in Modern Judaism (pp. 148-161). London, United Kingdom: Routledge.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781138786431en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/604375en
dc.description.abstractIn contemporary Britain, Jewish identity – what it means to be ‘Jewish’, how it is to be enacted and performed, and indeed the parameters and environments of Jewish life itself – have become more elastic. This chapter suggests that these changes can, in part, be understood as a consequence of Jewish suburbanisation across the twentieth century. As strangers became neighbours, the intimacies facilitated by spatial proximity and a shared investment in ‘place’ altered notions of ‘Jewishness’ and ‘Britishness’ in turn. However, as an examination of the period 1945-1966 suggests, the inter-play between and melding of minority and majority identity was rarely straight-forward.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesRoutledge Jewish Studies Seriesen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.routledge.com/products/9781138786431en
dc.subjectJewish Studiesen
dc.subjectIdentity constructionen
dc.title'Hands across the tea': Renegotiating Jewish Identity and Belonging in Post-war Britainen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
html.description.abstractIn contemporary Britain, Jewish identity – what it means to be ‘Jewish’, how it is to be enacted and performed, and indeed the parameters and environments of Jewish life itself – have become more elastic. This chapter suggests that these changes can, in part, be understood as a consequence of Jewish suburbanisation across the twentieth century. As strangers became neighbours, the intimacies facilitated by spatial proximity and a shared investment in ‘place’ altered notions of ‘Jewishness’ and ‘Britishness’ in turn. However, as an examination of the period 1945-1966 suggests, the inter-play between and melding of minority and majority identity was rarely straight-forward.


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