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dc.contributor.authorGrennan, Simon*
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-30T12:31:51Z
dc.date.available2016-03-30T12:31:51Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-01
dc.identifier.citationGrennan, S. (2015). Arts Practice and Research: Locating Alterity and Expertise. International Journal of Art & Design Education, 34(2), 249-259. doi: 10.1111/jade.1776
dc.identifier.issn1476-8070en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jade.1776
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/604006
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Grennan, S. (2015). Arts Practice and Research: Locating Alterity and Expertise. International Journal of Art & Design Education, 34(2), 249-259. doi: 10.1111/jade.1776 , which has been published in final form athttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jade.1776/epdf. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archivingen
dc.description.abstractThere is still no agreed pedagogic definition of practice-based research. However, there is not a dearth of definitions, but rather a wide variety, predicated upon the developing programmes of individual places of study. This article will examine these definitions in terms of underlying concepts of intentionality and alterity and the ways in which instrumental use of them affects study. The article will discuss a number of existing models for the theorising and adjudication of practice as research, and the questions that underpin their development. First, are non-text outputs, and the methods of their production, able to communicate knowledge rather than simply constituting knowledge? Second, by what criteria can this knowledge be adjudicated within an academic environment? Third, what is the status of these outputs and methods relative to the production of text? It will propose that interrogation of these models will advance little in discussions that focus on media. Text or nottext is beside the point. Rather, the relationship between research and practice can be explored as a relationship between intentionality and alterity, based in an essentially social conception of communities of expertise, including academic communities of expertise. Finally, the article will describe an attempt by the author to undertake a drawing activity in response to a research question, in order to assess the possibilities of articulating practice specifically in order to demonstrate expert knowledge of the field in which a research question occurs.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Journal of Art and Design Education
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1476-8070
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectpractice
dc.subjectresearch
dc.subjectart
dc.titleArts practice and research: locating alterity and expertise.
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T23:24:28Z
html.description.abstractThere is still no agreed pedagogic definition of practice-based research. However, there is not a dearth of definitions, but rather a wide variety, predicated upon the developing programmes of individual places of study. This article will examine these definitions in terms of underlying concepts of intentionality and alterity and the ways in which instrumental use of them affects study. The article will discuss a number of existing models for the theorising and adjudication of practice as research, and the questions that underpin their development. First, are non-text outputs, and the methods of their production, able to communicate knowledge rather than simply constituting knowledge? Second, by what criteria can this knowledge be adjudicated within an academic environment? Third, what is the status of these outputs and methods relative to the production of text? It will propose that interrogation of these models will advance little in discussions that focus on media. Text or nottext is beside the point. Rather, the relationship between research and practice can be explored as a relationship between intentionality and alterity, based in an essentially social conception of communities of expertise, including academic communities of expertise. Finally, the article will describe an attempt by the author to undertake a drawing activity in response to a research question, in order to assess the possibilities of articulating practice specifically in order to demonstrate expert knowledge of the field in which a research question occurs.


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