Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Bill*
dc.contributor.authorPiper, Heather*
dc.contributor.authorGarratt, Dean*
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T14:50:34Z
dc.date.available2016-03-29T14:50:34Z
dc.date.issued2014-03-31
dc.identifier.citationTaylor, B., Piper, H., & Garratt, D. (2014). Sports coaches as ‘dangerous individuals’ - practice as governmentality. Sport, Education and Society, 21(2), 183-199. DOI: 10.1080/13573322.2014.899492en
dc.identifier.issn1357-3322
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13573322.2014.899492
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/603911
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Sport, Education and Society on 31/03/2014, available online: doi: 10.1080/13573322.2014.899492en
dc.description.abstractRecent concern surrounding sports coaches’ interaction with young people has reflected a fundamental change in the way coaches and others regard the role of sports. In this paper, we consider the identification and definition of the contemporary sports coach (whether acting in a professional or volunteer capacity) as, in Foucault’s term, a ‘dangerous individual’. We suggest that the mainstream discourse of child protection and safeguarding, variously interpreted and applied, has contributed to a culture of fear in sports coaching practice. Drawing on data from a recently completed Economic and Social Research Council-funded research project, we argue that contradictions in policy and practice, which serve to privilege a particular discourse, have cast the coach as both predator and protector of young sports performers. This has undermined the role of the coach, led to intergenerational fear, created doubt about coaches’ intentions and promoted their adoption of defensive and protective practices. Utilising the concept of governmentality, we argue that, as a consequence, fundamental trust-based relationships, necessary in healthy athlete−coach engagement, have been displaced by a discourse embodied in sterile delivery and procedure governed by regulation and suspicion.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13573322.2014.899492
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectFoucault
dc.subjectGovernmentality
dc.subjectDeprofessionalisation
dc.subjectFear of the coach
dc.subjectDefensive coaching practices
dc.titleSports coaches as ‘dangerous individuals’ - practice as governmentality
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.eissn1470-1243
dc.contributor.departmentManchester Metropolitan University; University of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalSport, Education and Societyen
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttp://doi.org/10.1080/13573322.2014.899492
html.description.abstractRecent concern surrounding sports coaches’ interaction with young people has reflected a fundamental change in the way coaches and others regard the role of sports. In this paper, we consider the identification and definition of the contemporary sports coach (whether acting in a professional or volunteer capacity) as, in Foucault’s term, a ‘dangerous individual’. We suggest that the mainstream discourse of child protection and safeguarding, variously interpreted and applied, has contributed to a culture of fear in sports coaching practice. Drawing on data from a recently completed Economic and Social Research Council-funded research project, we argue that contradictions in policy and practice, which serve to privilege a particular discourse, have cast the coach as both predator and protector of young sports performers. This has undermined the role of the coach, led to intergenerational fear, created doubt about coaches’ intentions and promoted their adoption of defensive and protective practices. Utilising the concept of governmentality, we argue that, as a consequence, fundamental trust-based relationships, necessary in healthy athlete−coach engagement, have been displaced by a discourse embodied in sterile delivery and procedure governed by regulation and suspicion.
rioxxterms.publicationdate2014-03-31


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Taylor, Piper and Garratt.doc
Size:
151.5Kb
Format:
Microsoft Word
Request:
Main article

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/