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dc.contributor.authorWynne, Deborah*
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-18T14:06:37Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-18T14:06:37Zen
dc.date.issued2001-09-22en
dc.identifier.citationWynne, D. (2001). The Sensation Novel and the Victorian Family Magazine. Basingstoke, United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan.en
dc.identifier.isbn9780333776667en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/602225en
dc.description.abstractVictorian sensation novels, with their compulsive plots of crime, transgression and mystery, were bestsellers. Deborah Wynne analyses the fascinating relationships between sensation novels and the magazines in which they were serialized. Drawing upon the work of Wilkie Collins, Mary Braddon, Charles Dickens, Ellen Wood, and Charles Reade, and such popular family journals as All The Year Round, The Cornhill, and Once a Week, Wynne highlights how novels and magazines worked together to engage in the major cultural and social debates of the period.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillanen
dc.subjectSensation novelsen
dc.subjectVictorian literatureen
dc.subjectWilkie Collinsen
dc.subjectCharles Dickensen
dc.subjectM.E. Braddonen
dc.subjectEllen Wooden
dc.subjectCharles Readeen
dc.subjectAll The Year Rounden
dc.subjectThe Cornhillen
dc.subjectOnce A Weeken
dc.subjectserialisationen
dc.subjectVictorian periodicalsen
dc.subjectVictorian popular cultureen
dc.subjectVictorian journalismen
dc.titleThe Sensation Novel and the Victorian Family Magazineen
dc.typeBooken
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
html.description.abstractVictorian sensation novels, with their compulsive plots of crime, transgression and mystery, were bestsellers. Deborah Wynne analyses the fascinating relationships between sensation novels and the magazines in which they were serialized. Drawing upon the work of Wilkie Collins, Mary Braddon, Charles Dickens, Ellen Wood, and Charles Reade, and such popular family journals as All The Year Round, The Cornhill, and Once a Week, Wynne highlights how novels and magazines worked together to engage in the major cultural and social debates of the period.


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