Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHeeley, Kate*
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-19T11:37:54Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-19T11:37:54Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationHeeley, K. (2015). The representation of female prostitution in victorian and neo-victorian literature. (Master's dissertation). University of Chester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/596714en
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation discusses the representation of female prostitution in Victorian and Neo- Victorian literature by analysing the following texts: Oliver Twist, Mary Barton, The Crimson Petal and the White and Mrs Warren’s Profession. It analyses the stereotypical figure of the nineteenth century prostitute and looks beyond this representation by exploring image, maternity, female friendship and biblical symbols. The dissertation considers prostitution in Victorian culture as well as literature, and uses contemporaneous sources such as letters from Charles Dickens, newspaper articles and artwork in order to reinforce ideas. Ultimately the dissertation attempts to determine whether the prostitute was a powerful or a powerless figure by comparing the prostitutes in all four texts to each other and to their ‘respectable’ sisters.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectprostitutionen
dc.subjectvictorian literatureen
dc.subjectneo-Victorian literatureen
dc.titleThe Representation of Female Prostitution in Victorian and Neo-Victorian Literatureen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMAen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T17:51:29Z
html.description.abstractThis dissertation discusses the representation of female prostitution in Victorian and Neo- Victorian literature by analysing the following texts: Oliver Twist, Mary Barton, The Crimson Petal and the White and Mrs Warren’s Profession. It analyses the stereotypical figure of the nineteenth century prostitute and looks beyond this representation by exploring image, maternity, female friendship and biblical symbols. The dissertation considers prostitution in Victorian culture as well as literature, and uses contemporaneous sources such as letters from Charles Dickens, newspaper articles and artwork in order to reinforce ideas. Ultimately the dissertation attempts to determine whether the prostitute was a powerful or a powerless figure by comparing the prostitutes in all four texts to each other and to their ‘respectable’ sisters.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
KATE HEELEY.pdf
Size:
1.052Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record