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dc.contributor.authorStokes, Peter*
dc.contributor.authorLarson, Mitchell J.*
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Natalie*
dc.contributor.authorAdderley, Simon*
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Neil*
dc.contributor.authorMathews, Martin V. C.*
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Simon M.*
dc.contributor.authorLichy, Jessica*
dc.contributor.authorScott, Peter*
dc.contributor.authorWard, Tony*
dc.contributor.authorBrindley, Clare*
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-25T10:25:05Z
dc.date.available2016-01-25T10:25:05Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-01
dc.identifier.citationStokes, P, Larson, M., Russell, N., Adderley, S., Moore, N., Mathews, M., ... Brindley, C. (2015). ‘Smart cities’ – Dynamic sustainability issues and challenges for 'old world' economies: A Case from the United Kingdom. Dynamic Relationships Management Journal, 4(2), 3-22. doi:10.17708/DRMJ.2015.v04n02a01
dc.identifier.issn2232-5867en
dc.identifier.doi10.17708/DRMJ.2015.v04n02a01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/594761
dc.description.abstractThe rapid and dynamic rate of urbanization, particularly in emerging world economies, has resulted in a need to find sustainable ways of dealing with the excessive strains and pressures that come to bear on existing infrastructures and relationships. Increasingly during the twenty-first century policy makers have turned to technological solutions to deal with this challenge and the dynamics inherent within it. This move towards the utilization of technology to underpin infrastructure has led to the emergence of the term ‘Smart City’. Smart cities incorporate technology based solutions in their planning development and operation. This paper explores the organizational issues and challenges facing a post-industrial agglomeration in the North West of England as it attempted to become a ‘Smart City’. In particular the paper identifies and discusses the factors that posed significant challenges for the dynamic relationships residents, policymakers and public and private sector organizations and as a result aims to use these micro-level issues to inform the macro-debate and context of wider Smart City discussions. In order to achieve this, the paper develops a range of recommendations that are designed to inform Smart City design, planning and implementation strategies.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSlovenian Academy of Management
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sam-d.si/Drmj-Home.aspx
dc.subjectSmart cities
dc.subjecttechnology
dc.title‘Smart cities’ – Dynamic sustainability issues and challenges for 'old world' economies: A case from the United Kingdom
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.eissn2350-367X
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; Univeristy of Central Lancashire; Cornwall council; Univeristy of Birmingham; IDRAC; Liverpool John Moores University, Nottingham Trent Universityen
dc.identifier.journalDynamic Relationships Management Journalen
dc.internal.reviewer-noteOpen access journal. Awaiting reply from PS re oa KS 22/12/15en
html.description.abstractThe rapid and dynamic rate of urbanization, particularly in emerging world economies, has resulted in a need to find sustainable ways of dealing with the excessive strains and pressures that come to bear on existing infrastructures and relationships. Increasingly during the twenty-first century policy makers have turned to technological solutions to deal with this challenge and the dynamics inherent within it. This move towards the utilization of technology to underpin infrastructure has led to the emergence of the term ‘Smart City’. Smart cities incorporate technology based solutions in their planning development and operation. This paper explores the organizational issues and challenges facing a post-industrial agglomeration in the North West of England as it attempted to become a ‘Smart City’. In particular the paper identifies and discusses the factors that posed significant challenges for the dynamic relationships residents, policymakers and public and private sector organizations and as a result aims to use these micro-level issues to inform the macro-debate and context of wider Smart City discussions. In order to achieve this, the paper develops a range of recommendations that are designed to inform Smart City design, planning and implementation strategies.


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