Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Howard*
dc.contributor.authorAtkin, Alison*
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-20T18:12:51Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-20T18:12:51Zen
dc.date.issued2015-11-18en
dc.identifier.citationWilliams, H. & Atkin, A. (2015). Virtually Dead: Digital Public Mortuary Archaeology. Internet Archaeology, 40. http://dx.doi.org/10.11141/ia.40.7.4en
dc.identifier.issn1363-5387en
dc.identifier.doi10.11141/ia.40.7.4en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/594441en
dc.description.abstractOver recent decades, the ethics, politics and public engagements of mortuary archaeology have received sustained scrutiny, including how we handle, write about and display the archaeological dead. Yet the burgeoning use of digital media to engage different audiences in the archaeology of death and burial have so far escaped attention. This article explores categories and strategies by which digital media create virtual communities engaging with mortuary archaeology. Considering digital public mortuary archaeology (DPMA) as a distinctive theme linking archaeology, mortality and material culture, we discuss blogs, vlogs and Twitter as case studies to illustrate the variety of strategies by which digital media can promote, educate and engage public audiences with archaeological projects and research relating to death and the dead in the human past. The article then explores a selection of key critical concerns regarding how the digital dead are currently portrayed, identifying the need for further investigation and critical reflection on DPMA’s aims, objectives and aspired outcomes.
dc.description.sponsorshipManchester Metropolitan Universityen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternet Archaeologyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue40/7/4/toc.htmlen
dc.relation.urlhttp://intarch.ac.uk/en
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectCommunity archaeologyen
dc.subjectDigital mediaen
dc.subjectDigital public archaeologyen
dc.titleVirtually dead: digital public mortuary archaeologyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; University of Sheffielden
dc.identifier.journalInternet Archaeologyen
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.11141/ia.40.7.4
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T23:47:06Z
html.description.abstractOver recent decades, the ethics, politics and public engagements of mortuary archaeology have received sustained scrutiny, including how we handle, write about and display the archaeological dead. Yet the burgeoning use of digital media to engage different audiences in the archaeology of death and burial have so far escaped attention. This article explores categories and strategies by which digital media create virtual communities engaging with mortuary archaeology. Considering digital public mortuary archaeology (DPMA) as a distinctive theme linking archaeology, mortality and material culture, we discuss blogs, vlogs and Twitter as case studies to illustrate the variety of strategies by which digital media can promote, educate and engage public audiences with archaeological projects and research relating to death and the dead in the human past. The article then explores a selection of key critical concerns regarding how the digital dead are currently portrayed, identifying the need for further investigation and critical reflection on DPMA’s aims, objectives and aspired outcomes.
rioxxterms.publicationdate2015-11-18
dc.date.deposited2016-01-20


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
ia.40.7.4.pdf
Size:
183.4Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Open Access Article

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record