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dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Paul J.*
dc.contributor.authorCorteen, Karen*
dc.contributor.authorOgden, Cassandra A.*
dc.contributor.authorMorely, Sharon*
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T10:56:48Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-10T10:56:48Zen
dc.date.issued2012-03-07en
dc.identifier.citationTaylor, P., Corteen, K., Ogden, C., & Morley, S. (2012) ‘Standing by’: disability hate crime and the police in England. Criminal Justice Matters, 87(1), 46-47. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09627251.2012.671023en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09627251.2012.671023en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/583565en
dc.description.abstractThis article discusses the Don’t Stand By: Hate Crime Research Report (DSB) (Mencap, 2011), which documents failings in policing practices related to reporting and responding to disability hate crime. Such failings, we argue, constitute not so much direct discrimination but acts of ‘normalcy’. Normalcy is the process whereby taken for granted ideas about what is normal become naturalised; in this respect being non-disabled is seen as normal. Acts of normalcy, whilst less tangible, are by no means less violent or harmful than acts of ‘real discrimination’ or ‘real violence’ (Goodley and Rumswick-Cole, 2011). Systemic and cultural normalcy within the police is not new, as can be seen in the case of Stephen Lawrence.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.subjectintellectual disabilityen
dc.subjectpoliceen
dc.title‘Standing by’: disability hate crime and the police in Englanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalCriminal Justice Mattersen
html.description.abstractThis article discusses the Don’t Stand By: Hate Crime Research Report (DSB) (Mencap, 2011), which documents failings in policing practices related to reporting and responding to disability hate crime. Such failings, we argue, constitute not so much direct discrimination but acts of ‘normalcy’. Normalcy is the process whereby taken for granted ideas about what is normal become naturalised; in this respect being non-disabled is seen as normal. Acts of normalcy, whilst less tangible, are by no means less violent or harmful than acts of ‘real discrimination’ or ‘real violence’ (Goodley and Rumswick-Cole, 2011). Systemic and cultural normalcy within the police is not new, as can be seen in the case of Stephen Lawrence.


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