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dc.contributor.authorWynne, Deborah*
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-19T12:09:44Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-19T12:09:44Zen
dc.date.issued2015-04-28en
dc.identifier.citationThe ‘despised trade’ in textiles: H. G. Wells, William Paine, Charles Cavers and the male draper’s life, 1870–1914, Textile History, 2015, 46(1), pp. 99-113en
dc.identifier.issn0040-4969en
dc.identifier.issn1743-2952en
dc.identifier.doi10.1179/0040496915Z.00000000059en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/554153en
dc.descriptionGold open access article available at http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/10.1179/0040496915Z.00000000059en
dc.description.abstractThis essay examines the situation of the male draper in terms of his relationships to textiles and female customers between the 1870s and the outbreak of the First World War. Drawing on accounts of shop work produced by men employed as drapers and drapers’ assistants, the essay highlights the ridicule levelled against men who sold textiles, their work with fabrics and clothing, as well as the service they provided for an almost exclusively female clientele, being widely derided as unsuitable labour for a man. One draper recorded that his was ‘a despised trade’. Through an analysis of three first-hand accounts of the draper’s lot the essay raises questions about social constructions of masculinity in relation to representations of shop work and the handling of fabrics. The essay focuses on H. G. Wells’s descriptions of his teenage years as a draper’s apprentice recorded in his Experiment in Autobiography (1934); William Paine’s political treatise, Shop Slavery and Emancipation (1912), based on the injustices he experienced as a draper’s assistant; and the diary of a Bond Street draper, Charles Cavers, posthumously published as Hades! The Ladies! Being Extracts from the Diary of a Draper (1933).
dc.description.sponsorshipAHRC AH/K00803X/1en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManeyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.maneyonline.com/loi/texen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.maneyonline.com/doi/10.1179/0040496915Z.00000000059en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Textile Historyen
dc.subjectdrapersen
dc.subjectH.G. Wellsen
dc.subjectWilliam Paineen
dc.subjectCharles Caversen
dc.subjectretail historyen
dc.subjectlife writingen
dc.subjectVictorian Britainen
dc.subjectEdwardian Britainen
dc.titleThe ‘despised trade’ in textiles: H. G. Wells, William Paine, Charles Cavers and the male draper’s life, 1870–1914en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1743-2952
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalTextile Historyen
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1179/0040496915Z.00000000059
html.description.abstractThis essay examines the situation of the male draper in terms of his relationships to textiles and female customers between the 1870s and the outbreak of the First World War. Drawing on accounts of shop work produced by men employed as drapers and drapers’ assistants, the essay highlights the ridicule levelled against men who sold textiles, their work with fabrics and clothing, as well as the service they provided for an almost exclusively female clientele, being widely derided as unsuitable labour for a man. One draper recorded that his was ‘a despised trade’. Through an analysis of three first-hand accounts of the draper’s lot the essay raises questions about social constructions of masculinity in relation to representations of shop work and the handling of fabrics. The essay focuses on H. G. Wells’s descriptions of his teenage years as a draper’s apprentice recorded in his Experiment in Autobiography (1934); William Paine’s political treatise, Shop Slavery and Emancipation (1912), based on the injustices he experienced as a draper’s assistant; and the diary of a Bond Street draper, Charles Cavers, posthumously published as Hades! The Ladies! Being Extracts from the Diary of a Draper (1933).
rioxxterms.publicationdate2015-04-28
dc.date.deposited2015-05-19


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