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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Andy*
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Ken*
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-24T13:50:49Z
dc.date.available2009-02-24T13:50:49Z
dc.date.issued2005-06
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Youth Studies, 2005, 8(2), pp. 241 253
dc.identifier.issn1469-9680
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13676260500149386
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/50433
dc.descriptionThis journal article is not available through ChesterRep.
dc.description.abstractThis exploratory paper seeks, first, to offer some critical sociological comments on the common-sense, or rather ideological, claims surrounding two supposedly emerging 'crises': namely, the alleged poor health and declining sport and physical activity participation levels of young people. In this regard, it is suggested that while young people are, in fact, doing more sport and physical activity than at any other time in the past, this process has, and continues to, co-occur with other prominent social processes (e.g., rising levels of overweight, obesity and sedentariness). Second, the paper begins to make sense of this seemingly 'irreconcilable paradox' by arguing for the need to make use of a sociological perspective that views the complexity of young people's lives 'in the round' and by locating them within the particular social interdependencies or relationships in which they are inescapably involved.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t713393791en
dc.subjectsporten
dc.subjectparticipationen
dc.subjectyoung peopleen
dc.subjecthealthen
dc.titleThe place of sport and physical activity in young people's lives and its implications for health: Some sociological commentsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Youth Studiesen
html.description.abstractThis exploratory paper seeks, first, to offer some critical sociological comments on the common-sense, or rather ideological, claims surrounding two supposedly emerging 'crises': namely, the alleged poor health and declining sport and physical activity participation levels of young people. In this regard, it is suggested that while young people are, in fact, doing more sport and physical activity than at any other time in the past, this process has, and continues to, co-occur with other prominent social processes (e.g., rising levels of overweight, obesity and sedentariness). Second, the paper begins to make sense of this seemingly 'irreconcilable paradox' by arguing for the need to make use of a sociological perspective that views the complexity of young people's lives 'in the round' and by locating them within the particular social interdependencies or relationships in which they are inescapably involved.


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