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dc.contributor.authorSteen, Mary*
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Keith*
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-16T13:03:04Z
dc.date.available2009-02-16T13:03:04Z
dc.date.issued1998-09-03
dc.identifier.citationBritsh Journal of Midwifery, 1998, 6(9), pp. 572-579
dc.identifier.issn0969-4900
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/bjom.1998.6.9.572
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/49215
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep
dc.description.abstractPerineal trauma following childbirth often has numerous negative consequences for many women and the associated pain can dominate the experience of early motherhood. Applications of cold compresses have been in use for centuries as a form of localized treatment and these have become a generally accepted method to treat acute injuries. However, concerns have been expressed as to whether cold therapy can delay wound healing. The purpose of this article is to review the recent evidence concerning the beneficial use of cold therapy, when applied locally to perineal wounds and non-perineal wounds and to consider if such treatment may have an adverse effect on the rate of wound healing. In addition, the mechanism of the action of cold therapy is discussed. We conclude that there is no clear evidence to support the suggestion that when controlled therapy is applied to the traumatized perineum or other injured parts of the body that this will result in a delay in wound healing. Such treatment should continue until clear evidence is produced to the contrary.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMark Allen Publishersen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.britishjournalofmidwifery.com/en
dc.subjectcold therapyen
dc.subjectwoundsen
dc.subjectperineal traumaen
dc.subjectwound healingen
dc.subjectcold compressesen
dc.subjectpainen
dc.titleCold therapy and perineal wounds: Too cool or not too cool?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLeeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust/Leeds Metropolitan University
dc.identifier.journalBritsh Journal of Midwifery
html.description.abstractPerineal trauma following childbirth often has numerous negative consequences for many women and the associated pain can dominate the experience of early motherhood. Applications of cold compresses have been in use for centuries as a form of localized treatment and these have become a generally accepted method to treat acute injuries. However, concerns have been expressed as to whether cold therapy can delay wound healing. The purpose of this article is to review the recent evidence concerning the beneficial use of cold therapy, when applied locally to perineal wounds and non-perineal wounds and to consider if such treatment may have an adverse effect on the rate of wound healing. In addition, the mechanism of the action of cold therapy is discussed. We conclude that there is no clear evidence to support the suggestion that when controlled therapy is applied to the traumatized perineum or other injured parts of the body that this will result in a delay in wound healing. Such treatment should continue until clear evidence is produced to the contrary.


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