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dc.contributor.authorPowell, Jason*
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-16T10:03:03Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-16T10:03:03Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationPowell, J. L. (2015). Globalization and scapes: A new theory of global dynamics. International Journal of Social and Humanistic Sciences, 8(2), pp. 168-175en
dc.identifier.issn2300-2697en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/346692en
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.en
dc.description.abstractGlobalization has produced a distinctive stage in the social history of populational projections, with a growing tension between nation state-based solutions and anxieties and those formulated by global institutions (Powell, 2011). Globalization, defined here as the process whereby nation-states are influenced (and sometimes undermined) by trans-national actors. Human identity has, itself, become relocated within a trans-national context, with international organisations (such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund) and cross-border migrations, creating new conditions and environments for many displaced people (Estes, Biggs, & Phillipson, 2003). This paper examines the work of Appadurai and the extent to which has had a large impact on understanding the global dynamics of cultural, technological, political and economic change.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ilshs.plen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ilshs.pl/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/ILSHS-82-2015-168-175.pdfen
dc.subjectglobalizationen
dc.subjectscapesen
dc.titleGlobalization and scapes: A new theory of global dynamicsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Social and Humanistic Sciencesen
html.description.abstractGlobalization has produced a distinctive stage in the social history of populational projections, with a growing tension between nation state-based solutions and anxieties and those formulated by global institutions (Powell, 2011). Globalization, defined here as the process whereby nation-states are influenced (and sometimes undermined) by trans-national actors. Human identity has, itself, become relocated within a trans-national context, with international organisations (such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund) and cross-border migrations, creating new conditions and environments for many displaced people (Estes, Biggs, & Phillipson, 2003). This paper examines the work of Appadurai and the extent to which has had a large impact on understanding the global dynamics of cultural, technological, political and economic change.


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