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dc.contributor.authorKostakis, George*
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-13T13:42:49Zen
dc.date.available2015-02-13T13:42:49Zen
dc.date.issued2014-09en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/344417en
dc.description.abstractFunctional resistance training (FRT) is a relatively novel approach to resistance training that is becoming increasingly popular within the fitness domain and has been considered to be a better alternative than conventional resistance training (CRT) for improving various measures of muscular and neuromotor fitness. The definitions describing FRT vary to a great extent in the scientific literature, however, the major characteristic of this training method is that it includes movement-based exercises performed in multiple planes of motion which are designed to imitate activities of daily living (ADLs). Despite the popularity of FRT, most studies on this exercise method have until now mainly been based on anecdotal information from the fitness industry "experts", who have made exaggerated claims about functional exercises and their health benefits. Moreover, because functional training has its origins in physical therapy, the majority of studies have previously focused on older adults and on patients in the rehabilitation process. Therefore, for this reason, there is a scarcity of research studies especially those which include healthy young adults. Consequently, FRT has soared in popularity over the last decade, despite the fact that the research-based evidence is restricted to older people.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectfunctional resistance trainingen
dc.subjectexercise adherenceen
dc.titleEffects of functional vs. conventional circuit training on anthropometric variables and physical self-efficacy of young adultsen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T14:39:05Z
html.description.abstractFunctional resistance training (FRT) is a relatively novel approach to resistance training that is becoming increasingly popular within the fitness domain and has been considered to be a better alternative than conventional resistance training (CRT) for improving various measures of muscular and neuromotor fitness. The definitions describing FRT vary to a great extent in the scientific literature, however, the major characteristic of this training method is that it includes movement-based exercises performed in multiple planes of motion which are designed to imitate activities of daily living (ADLs). Despite the popularity of FRT, most studies on this exercise method have until now mainly been based on anecdotal information from the fitness industry "experts", who have made exaggerated claims about functional exercises and their health benefits. Moreover, because functional training has its origins in physical therapy, the majority of studies have previously focused on older adults and on patients in the rehabilitation process. Therefore, for this reason, there is a scarcity of research studies especially those which include healthy young adults. Consequently, FRT has soared in popularity over the last decade, despite the fact that the research-based evidence is restricted to older people.


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