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dc.contributor.authorBoduszek, Daniel*
dc.contributor.authorDhingra, Katie*
dc.contributor.authorHyland, Philip*
dc.contributor.authorDebowska, Agata*
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T16:30:59Zen
dc.date.available2015-02-04T16:30:59Zen
dc.date.issued2015-03-31en
dc.identifier.citationBoduszek, D., Dhingra, K., Hyland, P., & Debowska, A. (2015). A bifactorial solution to the psychopathy checklist screening version in a sample of civil psychiatric patients. Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health, 26(3), 174-185. https://doi.org/10.1002/cbm.1956en
dc.identifier.issn0957-9664en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/cbm.1956en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/344201en
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Boduszek, D., Dhingra, K., Hyland, P., & Debowska, A. (2015). A bifactorial solution to the psychopathy checklist screening version in a sample of civil psychiatric patients. Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health, 26(3), 174-185. https://doi.org/10.1002/cbm.1956, which has been published in final form at [http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cbm.1956/ This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.en
dc.description.abstractBackground: There is considerable debate about the underlying factor structure of the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL: SV). An established view is that it reflects a unitary construct underpinned by two correlated factors. More recent research has, however, undermined this conceptualisation. Aims: Our aim was to compare 10 competing models of the PCL: SV in a sample of civil psychiatric patients. Method: Ten distinct factor models were specified and tested using conventional confirmatory factor analytic techniques, along with confirmatory bifactor modelling. Results: A bifactor model, including two general factors (interpersonal-affective and antisocial-lifestyle), and four subordinate factors (interpersonal, affective, antisocial, and lifestyle) provided the best fit to the data. The reliability of the conceptualisation was supported through the use of composite reliability, and the differential relationships exhibited between the general factors and measures of personality, impulsivity, and mental health. Conclusions: The results suggest that two general factors should be taken into account when interpreting the PCL:SV for clinical purposes.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/cbm.1956en
dc.subjectPSL:SVen
dc.subjectbifactorial modellingen
dc.subjectconfirmatory factor analysisen
dc.subjectpsychopathyen
dc.titleA bifactorial solution to the psychopathy checklist screening version in a sample of civil psychiatric patientsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2857en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Huddersfield ; Manchester Metropolitan University ; National College of Ireland ; University of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalCriminal Behaviour and Mental Healthen
dc.date.accepted2015-02-03
html.description.abstractBackground: There is considerable debate about the underlying factor structure of the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL: SV). An established view is that it reflects a unitary construct underpinned by two correlated factors. More recent research has, however, undermined this conceptualisation. Aims: Our aim was to compare 10 competing models of the PCL: SV in a sample of civil psychiatric patients. Method: Ten distinct factor models were specified and tested using conventional confirmatory factor analytic techniques, along with confirmatory bifactor modelling. Results: A bifactor model, including two general factors (interpersonal-affective and antisocial-lifestyle), and four subordinate factors (interpersonal, affective, antisocial, and lifestyle) provided the best fit to the data. The reliability of the conceptualisation was supported through the use of composite reliability, and the differential relationships exhibited between the general factors and measures of personality, impulsivity, and mental health. Conclusions: The results suggest that two general factors should be taken into account when interpreting the PCL:SV for clinical purposes.


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