• Identifying the cellular targets of drug action in the central nervous system following corticosteroid therapy

      Jenkins, Stuart I.; Pickard, Mark R.; Khong, Melinda; Smith, Heather L.; Mann, Carl L. A.; Emes, Richard D.; Chari, Divya M.; Keele University, University of Nottingham, University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust, United Kingdom (American Chemical Society, 2014-01-15)
      Corticosteroid (CS) therapy is used widely in the treatment of a range of pathologies, but can delay production of myelin, the insulating sheath around central nervous system nerve fibers. The cellular targets of CS action are not fully understood, that is, "direct" action on cells involved in myelin genesis [oligodendrocytes and their progenitors the oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs)] versus "indirect" action on other neural cells. We evaluated the effects of the widely used CS dexamethasone (DEX) on purified OPCs and oligodendrocytes, employing complementary histological and transcriptional analyses. Histological assessments showed no DEX effects on OPC proliferation or oligodendrocyte genesis/maturation (key processes underpinning myelin genesis). Immunostaining and RT-PCR analyses show that both cell types express glucocorticoid receptor (GR; the target for DEX action), ruling out receptor expression as a causal factor in the lack of DEX-responsiveness. GRs function as ligand-activated transcription factors, so we simultaneously analyzed DEX-induced transcriptional responses using microarray analyses; these substantiated the histological findings, with limited gene expression changes in DEX-treated OPCs and oligodendrocytes. With identical treatment, microglial cells showed profound and global changes post-DEX addition; an unexpected finding was the identification of the transcription factor Olig1, a master regulator of myelination, as a DEX responsive gene in microglia. Our data indicate that CS-induced myelination delays are unlikely to be due to direct drug action on OPCs or oligodendrocytes, and may occur secondary to alterations in other neural cells, such as the immune component. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comparative molecular and cellular analysis of CS effects in glial cells, to investigate the targets of this major class of anti-inflammatory drugs as a basis for myelination deficits.
    • The importance of clinician, patient and researcher collaborations in Alport syndrome

      Rheault, Michelle N.; Savige, Judith; Randles, Michael J.; Weinstock, André; Stepney, Melissa; Turner, Neil; Parziale, Gina; Gross, Oliver; Flinter, Frances A; Miner, Jeffrey H; et al. (Springer Nature, 2019-05-01)
      Alport syndrome (AS) is caused by mutations in the genes COL4A3, COL4A4 or COL4A5 and is characterised by progressive glomerular disease, sensorineural hearing loss and ocular defects. Occurring in less than 1:5000, AS is rare genetic disorder but still accounts for >1% of the prevalent population receiving renal replacement therapy. There is also increasing awareness about the risk of chronic kidney disease in individuals with heterozygous mutations in AS genes. The mainstay of current therapy is the use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers, yet potential new therapies are now entering clinical trials. The 2017 International Workshop on Alport Syndrome in Glasgow was a preconference workshop ahead of the 50th anniversary meeting of the European Society for Pediatric Nephrology. It focussed on updates in clinical practice, genetics, basic science and also incorporated patient perspectives. More than 80 international experts including clinicians, geneticists, researchers from academia and industry, and patient representatives took part in panel discussions and breakout groups. This report summarises the workshop proceedings and the relevant contemporary literature. It highlights the unique clinician, patient and researcher collaborations achieved by regular engagement between the groups.
    • An In Vitro Comparison of the Incorporation, Growth, and Chondrogenic Potential of Human Bone Marrow versus Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Clinically Relevant Cell Scaffolds Used for Cartilage Repair

      Kohli, Nupur; Johnson, William Eustace Basil; Wright, Karina T.; Sammons, Rachel L.; Jeys, Lee; Snow, Martyn
      Aim: To compare the incorporation, growth, and chondrogenic potential of bone marrow (BM) and adipose tissue (AT) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in scaffolds used for cartilage repair. Methods: Human BM and AT MSCs were isolated, culture expanded, and characterised using standard protocols, then seeded into 2 different scaffolds, Chondro-Gide or Alpha Chondro Shield. Cell adhesion, incorporation, and viable cell growth were assessed microscopically and following calcein AM/ethidium homodimer (Live/Dead) staining. Cell-seeded scaffolds were treated with chondrogenic inducers for 28 days. Extracellular matrix deposition and soluble glycosaminoglycan (GAG) release into the culture medium was measured at day 28 by histology/immunohistochemistry and dimethylmethylene blue assay, respectively. Results: A greater number of viable MSCs from either source adhered and incorporated into Chondro-Gide than into Alpha Chondro Shield. In both cell scaffolds, this incorporation represented less than 2% of the cells that were seeded. There was a marked proliferation of BM MSCs, but not AT MSCs, in Chondro-Gide. MSCs from both sources underwent chondrogenic differentiation following induction. However, cartilaginous extracellular matrix deposition was most marked in Chondro-Gide seeded with BM MSCs. Soluble GAG secretion increased in chondrogenic versus control conditions. There was no marked difference in GAG secretion by MSCs from either cell source. Conclusion: Chondro-Gide and Alpha Chondro Shield were permissive to the incorporation and chondrogenic differentiation of human BM and AT MSCs. Chondro-Gide seeded with BM MSCs demonstrated the greatest increase in MSC number and deposition of a cartilaginous tissue.
    • An in vitro comparison of the neurotrophic and angiogenic activity of human and canine adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs): translating MSC-based therapies for spinal cord injury.

      Al Delfi, Ibtesam R. T; Wood, Chelsea R.; Johnson, Louis D. V.; Snow, Martyn D.; Innes, John F.; Myint, Peter; Johnson, William E. B.; Kut University College; University of Chester; Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham; Veterinary Tissue Bank, Chirk
      The majority of research into the effects of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplants on spinal cord injury (SCI) is performed in rodent models, which may help inform on mechanisms of action, but does not represent the scale and wound heterogeneity seen in human SCI. In contrast, SCI in dogs occurs naturally, is more akin to human SCI, and can be used to help address important aspects of the development of human MSC-based therapies. To enable translation to the clinic and a comparison across species, we have examined the paracrine, regenerative capacity of human and canine adipose-derived MSCs in vitro. MSCs were initially phenotyped according to tissue culture plastic adherence, CD immunoprofiling and tri-lineage differentiation potential. Conditioned medium (CM) from MSC cultures was then assessed for its neurotrophic and angiogenic activity using established cell-based assays. MSC CM significantly increased neuronal cell proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and βIII tubulin immunopositivity. In addition, MSC CM significantly increased endothelial cell migration, cell proliferation and the formation of tubule-like structures in Matrigel assays. There were no marked or significant differences in the capacity of human or canine MSC CM to stimulate neuronal cell or endothelial cell activity. Hence, this study supports the use of MSC transplants for canine SCI, furthermore it increases understanding of how this may subsequently provide useful information and translate to MSC transplants for human SCI.
    • An in vitro spinal cord injury model to screen neuroregenerative materials

      Weightman, Alan P.; Pickard, Mark R.; Yang, Ying; Chari, Divya M.; Keele University (Elsevier, 2014-01-29)
      Implantable 'structural bridges' based on nanofabricated polymer scaffolds have great promise to aid spinal cord regeneration. Their development (optimal formulations, surface functionalizations, safety, topographical influences and degradation profiles) is heavily reliant on live animal injury models. These have several disadvantages including invasive surgical procedures, ethical issues, high animal usage, technical complexity and expense. In vitro 3-D organotypic slice arrays could offer a solution to overcome these challenges, but their utility for nanomaterials testing is undetermined. We have developed an in vitro model of spinal cord injury that replicates stereotypical cellular responses to neurological injury in vivo, viz. reactive gliosis, microglial infiltration and limited nerve fibre outgrowth. We describe a facile method to safely incorporate aligned, poly-lactic acid nanofibre meshes (±poly-lysine + laminin coating) within injury sites using a lightweight construct. Patterns of nanotopography induced outgrowth/alignment of astrocytes and neurons in the in vitro model were strikingly similar to that induced by comparable materials in related studies in vivo. This highlights the value of our model in providing biologically-relevant readouts of the regeneration-promoting capacity of synthetic bridges within the complex environment of spinal cord lesions. Our approach can serve as a prototype to develop versatile bio-screening systems to identify materials/combinatorial strategies for regenerative medicine, whilst reducing live animal experimentation.
    • Influence of Amplitude of Oscillating Magnetic Fields on Magnetic Nanoparticle-Mediated Gene Transfer to Astrocytes

      Tickle, Jacqueline A.; Jenkins, Stuart I.; Pickard, Mark R.; Chari, Divya M.; Keele University, United Kingdom (World Scientific, 2014-08-07)
      Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging as a major nanoplatform for regenerative neurology, particularly as transfection agents for gene delivery. Magnetic assistive technology, particularly the recent innovation of applied oscillating magnetic fields, can significantly enhance MNP-mediated gene transfer to neural cells. While transfection efficiency varies with oscillation frequency in various neural cell types, the influence of oscillation amplitude has not yet been investigated. We have addressed this issue using cortical astrocytes that were transfected using MNPs functionalized with plasmid encoding a reporter protein. Cells were exposed to a range of oscillation amplitudes (100–1000 μm), using a fixed oscillation frequency of 1 Hz. No significant differences were found in the proportions of transfected cells at the amplitudes tested, but GFP-related optical density measurements (indicative of reporter protein expression) were significantly enhanced at 200 μm. Safety data show no amplitude-dependent toxicity. Our data suggest that the amplitude of oscillating magnetic fields influences MNP-mediated transfection, and a tailored combination of amplitude and frequency may further enhance transgene expression. Systematic testing of these parameters in different neural subtypes will enable the development of a database of neuro-magnetofection protocols — an area of nanotechnology research where little information currently exists.
    • The influence of nicotinamide on the development of neurons

      Griffin, Sile; Pickard, Mark R.; Hawkins, Clive P.; Williams, Adrian C.; Chari, Divya M.; Fricker, Rosemary; Orme, Rowan P.; Keele University, University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom (2014-09-09)
      A major challenge in translating the promise of stem cell therapies to treat a myriad of neurodegenerative disorders is to rapidly and efficiently direct pluripotent stem cells to generate differentiated neurons. The application of active vitamin metabolites known to function in embryonic development and maintenance in the adult brain such as retinoic acid (vitamin A), ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and calcitriol (vitamin D3) have proven effective in current in-vitro differentiation protocols. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether the biologically active vitamin B3 metabolite, nicotinamide could enhance the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells, cultured as monolayers, into mature neurons at either early or late stages of development. Interestingly, nicotinamide elicited a dose-responsive increase in the percentage of neurons when added at an early developmental stage to the cells undergoing differentiation (days 0–7). Nicotinamide (10 mM) increased the proportion of β-III tubulin positive neurons by two fold and concomitantly decreased the total number of cells in culture, measured by quantification of 4′, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole positive cells. This effect could result from induction of cell-cycle exit and/or selective cell death in non-neural populations. Higher levels of nicotinamide (20 mM) induced cytoxicity and cell death. This study supports previous evidence that vitamins and their metabolites can efficiently direct stem cells into neurons. Current work is focusing on the effect of nicotinamide on the process of neural induction and whether nicotinamide influences the generation of particular neuronal subtypes implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, specifically focusing on midbrain dopamine neurons; towards a therapy for Parkinson's disease.
    • The influence of pH and fluid dynamics on the antibacterial efficacy of 45S5 Bioglass Short title: Antibacterial efficacy of 45S5 Bioglass

      Begum, Saima; Johnson, William Eustace Basil; Worthington, Tony; Martin, Richard; Aston University (IOP Publishing, 2016-02-02)
      In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the potential antibacterial properties that bioactive glasses may possess. However, there have been several conflicting reports on the antibacterial efficacy of 45S5 Bioglass®. Various mechanisms regarding its mode of action have been proposed, such as changes in the environmental pH, increased osmotic pressure, and 'needle-like' sharp glass debris which could potentially damage prokaryotic cell walls and thus inactivate bacteria. In this current study, a systematic investigation was undertaken on the antibacterial efficacy of 45S5 Bioglass® on Escherichia coli NCTC 10538 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCO 6538 under a range of clinically relevant scenarios including varying Bioglass® concentration, direct and indirect contact between Bioglass® and microorganisms, static and shaking incubation conditions, elevated and neutralised pH environments. The results demonstrated that, under elevated pH conditions, Bioglass® particles have no antibacterial effect on S. aureus while a concentration dependent antibacterial effect against E. coli was observed. However, the antibacterial activity ceased when the pH of the media was neutralised. The results of this current study, therefore, suggest that the mechanism of antibacterial activity of Bioglass® is associated with changes in the environmental pH; an environment that is less likely to occur in vivo due to buffering of the system.
    • Interactions between PP4 and PEA-15 in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis of breast cancer cells

      Mohammed, Hiba N.; Pickard, Mark R.; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Keele University, United Kingdom (NCRI Cancer Conference 2015 Abstracts, 2015)
      Background The serine/threonine protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) is recognised to regulate a variety of cellular functions. Our previous work has shown that the catalytic subunit of PP4 (PP4c) promotes cell death and inhibits proliferation in breast cancer cells, suggestive of a role of PP4c as tumour suppressor gene. Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes 15 (PEA-15), a member of the death effector domain protein family known to control cell survival, is reported to be regulated by PP4c. The aims of this study were to investigate the involvement of PEA-15 in mediating the effects of PP4c on breast cancer cells. Method PEA-15 phosphorylation was examined by western blot analysis on proteins extracted from MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells over-expressing PP4 and PP4 knock down cells. To investigate the role of PEA-15 in mediating the effects of PP4c, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 were transfected with control (-) siRNA or with three different PEA-15 specific siRNAs. 48 h post-transfection, control cells (transfected with negative control siRNA) and cells transfected with PEA-15 siRNAs were transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-PP4c expression construct or pcDNA3.1. Cell viability and apoptosis level were assessed post transfection. Results In MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, the phosphorylation state of PEA-15 increased when PP4c expression was suppressed and decreased when PP4c was over-expressed. Over-expression of PP4c in cells transfected with (-) siRNA caused 50% reduction in viability compared to cells transfected with empty vector. Cells transfected with PEA-15 siRNAs showed a decrease in viable cell number and long term survival. However, over-expression of PP4c in these cells did not have any additional effect on the decrease in cell viability. Conclusion These observations suggest that the induction of apoptosis by over-expression of PP4c is mediated, at least in part, by the dephosphorylation of PEA-15. The interactions between PEA-15 and PP4c may therefore be critical in breast cancer tumorigenesis.
    • An Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) of coercion towards community dwelling older adults with dementia: Findings from MYsore studies of Natal effects on Ageing and Health (MYNAH)

      Danivas, Vijay; Bharmal, Mufaddal; Keenan, Paul; Jones, Steven; Karat, Samuel C.; Kalyanaraman, Kumaran; Prince, Martin; Fall, Caroline H. D.; Krishna, Murali; University of Chester (Springer, 2016-09-29)
      Purpose Limited availability of specialist services places a considerable burden on caregivers of Persons with Dementia (PwD) in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs). There are limited qualitative data on coercive behavior towards PwD in an LMIC setting. Aim The aim of this study was to find relevant themes of the lived experience of relatives as caregivers for PwD in view of their use of coercive measures in community setting in South India. Method Primary caregivers (n = 13) of PwDs from the Mysore study of Natal effects on Ageing and Health (MYNAH) in South India were interviewed to explore the nature and impact of coercion towards community dwelling older adults with dementia. The narrative data were coded using an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) approach for thematic analysis and theory formation. Results Caregivers reported feeling physical and emotional burn-out, a lack of respite care, an absence of shared caregiving arrangements, limited knowledge of dementia, and a complete lack of community support services. They reported restrictions on their lives through not being able take employment, a poor social life, reduced income and job opportunities, and restricted movement that impacted on their physical and emotional well-being. Inappropriate use of sedatives, seclusion and environmental restraint, and restricted dietary intake, access to finances and participation in social events, was commonly reported methods of coercion used by caregivers towards PwD. Reasons given by caregivers for employing these coercive measures included safeguarding of the PwD and for the management of behavioral problems and physical health. Conclusion There is an urgent need for training health and social care professionals to better understand the use of coercive measures and their impact on persons with dementia in India. It is feasible to conduct qualitative research using IPA in South India.
    • Investigating the Prevalence of Anaemia in Rural Gambia, in Relation to Levels of Zinc Protoporphyrin, Haemoglobin and Haptoglobin (Phenotype and Genotype)

      Bah, Ebrima; Michelangeli, Frank (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2020-05-29)
      Abstract Objectives To find out the overlapping and correlating relationships between serum haptoglobin level, haptoglobin genotype and phenotype, blood haemoglobin level and zinc protoporphyrin (measured in washed RBCs) in association to prevalence of anaemia. It will focus on comparing all the mention components in contrast to each other. The study will also look for the frequency distribution of the major HP alleles. Methods 1278 participants were randomly selected. Blood samples collected by trained nurses. Data generation was done at the Medical research council (keneba field station) research site. Data Analysis was conducted at the university of Chester with the assistance of the computer department team. Results P = 0.000 indicating anaemia prevalence with HP 1 allele. P > 0.05 when ID, IDA and AI relates with HP genotype. Positive correlation between ZnPP and HP serum level, but negative between ZnPP and Hb. P = 0.000 between ZnPP and IDA. P = 0.024 between HP genotype and Hb level. P = 0.013 between HP genotype and HP serum. P = 0.100 between HP genotype and ZnPP. P = 0.000 between ZnPP and IDA. P = 0.024 between HP genotype and Hb. ZnPP shared a positive correlation with HP serum level, and a negative correlation with Hb level. The correlation significant = 0.01 level (2-tailed) P = 0.01. The correlation between HP genotype and HP serum level was significant with P = 0.013, but the correlation between HP genotype and ZnPP was not significant with P = 0.100. Conclusions HP genotype had association with anaemia prevalence and more occurrence was observed in carriers of the type ‘1’ allele. It had no association with ID, IDA and AI. HP genotype had association with HP serum level and Hb level but had no association with ZnPP level. ZnPP level was observed to have had association with HP serum level, Hb level and IDA; but had no association with ID and AI in the region. Funding Sources All the resources used in this study were from MRC Keneba (International Nutrition Group) which is supported by funds from the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) and the UK Department for International Development (DFID) under the MRC/DFID Concordat agreement (Hennig et al., 2015).
    • Lamin A/C dysregulation contributes to cardiac pathology in a mouse model of severe spinal muscular atrophy

      Soltic, Darija; Shorrock, Hannah K; Allardyce, Hazel; Wilson, Emma L; Holt, Ian; Synowsky, Silvia A; Shirran, Sally L; Parson, Simon H; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Fuller, HR; et al.
      Cardiac pathology is emerging as a prominent systemic feature of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), but little is known about the underlying molecular pathways. Using quantitative proteomics analysis, we demonstrate widespread molecular defects in heart tissue from the Taiwanese mouse model of severe SMA. We identify increased levels of lamin A/C as a robust molecular phenotype in the heart of SMA mice and show that lamin A/C dysregulation is also apparent in SMA patient fibroblast cells and other tissues from SMA mice. Lamin A/C expression was regulated in vitro by knockdown of the E1 ubiquitination factor ubiquitin-like modifier activating enzyme 1, a key downstream mediator of SMN-dependent disease pathways, converging on β-catenin signaling. Increased levels of lamin A are known to increase the rigidity of nuclei, inevitably disrupting contractile activity in cardiomyocytes. The increased lamin A/C levels in the hearts of SMA mice therefore provide a likely mechanism explaining morphological and functional cardiac defects, leading to blood pooling. Therapeutic strategies directed at lamin A/C may therefore offer a new approach to target cardiac pathology in SMA.
    • The long non-coding RNA NEAT1 regulates cell survival in breast cancer cell lines

      Almnaseer, Zainab; Pickard, Mark R.; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Keele University, United Kingdom (NCRI Cancer Conference 2015 Abstracts, 2015)
      Background Nuclear long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) regulate various cellular processes including the organization of nuclear sub-structures, the alteration of chromatin state, and the regulation of gene expression. Nuclear Enriched Abundant Transcript 1 (NEAT1) is a nuclear lncRNA transcribed from chromosome 11q13. Two transcripts are produced from the NEAT1 gene, 3.7-kb NEAT1_v1 and 23-kb NEAT1_v2. Both isoforms participate in the formation of the nuclear paraspeckles . NEAT1 is reported to be overexpressed in prostate cancer and a direct transcriptional target of hypoxia-inducible factor in many breast cancer cell lines. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of silencing NEAT1 on breast cancer cell survival. Method MCF7 and MDA-MB 231 cells were transfected with siRNAs to different NEAT1 sequences or NEAT1 antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). Controls received scrambled siRNA or scrambled oligonucleotide, as appropriate. In some experiments, cells were exposed to ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light post-transfection to induce apoptosis, and then culture viability and apoptosis were assessed. NEAT1 expression was evaluated by qRT-PCR TaqMan® analysis. Results In MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, siRNA-mediated silencing of NEAT1 reduced basal survival and after UV-C irradiation and decreased their colony forming ability. NEAT1 ASOs were more effective in silencing NEAT1 and caused a greater reduction in cell viability. NEAT1 silencing also affected cell cycle profile by enhancing the proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase. Conclusion NEAT1 regulates the survival of Breast cells. Down regulation of NEAT1 expression decreased cell survival, proliferation and modulated cell cycle progression of breast cancer cells, indicating a link between the NEAT1 expression levels and carcinogenesis of breast cancer.
    • Long non-coding RNAs: new opportunities and old challenges in cancer therapy

      Williams, Gwyn T.; Pickard, Mark R.; Keele University; University of Chester (AME Publishing Company, 2016-09)
      No abstract - invited commentary
    • Long-term administration of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone mesylate fails to attenuate age-related oxidative damage or rescue the loss of muscle mass and function associated with aging of skeletal muscle

      Nye, Gareth; Sakellariou, Giorgos; Lightfoot, Adam; Pearson, Timothy; Wells, Nicola; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia; Griffiths, Richard; University of Liverpool (Faseb Journal, 2016-08-22)
      Age-related skeletal muscle dysfunction is the underlying cause of morbidity that affects up to half the population aged 80 and over. Considerable evidence indicates that oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the sarcopenic phenotype that occurs with aging. To examine this, we administered the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone mesylate {[10-(4,5-dimethoxy-2-methyl-3,6-dioxo-1,4-cyclohexadien-1-yl)decyl] triphenylphosphonium; 100 μM} to wild-type C57BL/6 mice for 15 wk (from 24 to 28 mo of age) and investigated the effects on age-related loss of muscle mass and function, changes in redox homeostasis, and mitochondrial organelle integrity and function. We found that mitoquinone mesylate treatment failed to prevent age-dependent loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with myofiber atrophy or alter a variety of in situ and ex vivo muscle function analyses, including maximum isometric tetanic force, decline in force after a tetanic fatiguing protocol, and single-fiber-specific force. We also found evidence that long-term mitoquinone mesylate administration did not reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or induce significant changes in muscle redox homeostasis, as assessed by changes in 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, protein carbonyl content, protein nitration, and DNA damage determined by the content of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. Mitochondrial membrane potential, abundance, and respiration assessed in permeabilized myofibers were not significantly altered in response to mitoquinone mesylate treatment. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that long-term mitochondria-targeted mitoquinone mesylate administration failed to attenuate age-related oxidative damage in skeletal muscle of old mice or provide any protective effect in the context of muscle aging
    • Low leukotriene B4 receptor 1 leads to ALOX5 downregulation at diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia

      Lucas, Claire; Harris, Robert; McDonald, Elizabeth; Giannoudis, Athina; Clark, Richard; University of Liverpool, Royal Liverpool University hospital, (Ferrata Storti Foundation, 2014-11-01)
      ALOX5 is implicated in chronic myeloid leukemia development in mouse leukemic stem cells, but its importance in human chronic myeloid leukemia is unknown. Functional ALOX5 was assessed using an LTB4 ELISA and ALOX5, and LTB4R1 mRNA expression was determined via a TaqMan gene expression assay. LTB4R1 and 5-LOX protein levels were assessed by cell surface flow cytometry analysis. At diagnosis ALOX5 was below normal in both blood and CD34(+) stem cells in all patients. On treatment initiation, ALOX5 levels increased in all patients except those who were destined to progress subsequently to blast crisis. LTB4 levels were increased despite low ALOX5 expression, suggesting that the arachidonic acid pathway is functioning normally up to the point of LTB4 production. However, the LTB4 receptor (BLT1) protein in newly diagnosed patients was significantly lower than after a period of treatment (P<0.0001). The low level of LTB4R1 at diagnosis explains the downregulation of ALOX5. In the absence of LTB4R1, the arachidonic acid pathway intermediates (5-HEPTE and LTA4) negatively regulate ALOX5. ALOX5 regulation is aberrant in chronic myeloid leukemia patients and may not be important for the development of the disease. Our data suggest caution when extrapolating mouse model data into human chronic myeloid leukemia.
    • Magnetic nanoparticle-mediated gene delivery to two- and three-dimensional neural stem cell cultures: magnet-assisted transfection and multifection approaches to enhance outcomes

      Pickard, Mark R.; Adams, Christopher F.; Chari, Divya M.; University of Chester; Keele University (Wiley, 2017-02-02)
      Neural stem cells (NSCs) have high translational potential in transplantation therapies for neural repair. Enhancement of their therapeutic capacity by genetic engineering is an important goal for regenerative neurology. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are major non-viral vectors for safe bioengineering of NSCs, offering critical translational benefits over viral vectors, including safety, scalability, and ease of use. This unit describes protocols for the production of suspension (neurosphere) and adherent (monolayer) murine NSC cultures. Genetic engineering of NSCs with MNPs and the application of 'magnetofection' (magnetic fields) or 'multifection' (repeat transfection) approaches to enhance gene delivery are described. Magnetofection of monolayer cultures achieves optimal transfection, but neurospheres offer key advantages for neural graft survival post-transplantation. A protocol is presented which allows the advantageous features of each approach to be combined into a single procedure for transplantation. The adaptation of these protocols for other MNP preparations is considered, with emphasis on the evaluation of procedural safety.
    • Mechanisms of skeletal muscle ageing: avenues for therapeutic intervention

      Nye, Gareth; McCormick, Rachel; Lightfoot, Adam; McArdle, Anne; University of Liverpool (Elsevier, 2014-05-28)
      Age-related loss of muscle mass and function, termed sarcopenia, is a catastrophic process, which impacts severely on quality of life of older people. The mechanisms underlying sarcopenia are unclear and the development of optimal therapeutic interventions remains elusive. Impaired regenerative capacity, attenuated ability to respond to stress, elevated reactive oxygen species production and low-grade systemic inflammation are all key contributors to sarcopenia. Pharmacological intervention using compounds such as 17AAG, SS-31 and Bimagrumab or naturally occurring polyphenols to target specific pathways show potential benefit to combat sarcopenia although further research is required, particularly to identify the mechanisms by which muscle fibres are completely lost with increasing age.
    • Mental Health Decisions; what every officer should consider

      Williams, Barry; Jones, Steven; University of Chester (Police Professional, 2012-05-24)
      It can often appear to Police officers that they are damned if they do make decisions, and damned if they don’t in mental health cases. A culture has evolved that triggers decision apathy and defensive decisions that arguably do not benefit the Police, public, or the mental health arrestee. Decisions of this presenting complexity in whatever profession must be made and firmly rooted within the current evidence base, lawful, and also be reasonable in the given situation. It is therefore not unreasonable to expect officers to explain and account for how and why they acted as they did, and the frameworks (statutes/ codes) which should underpin such practice decisions. It is of paramount importance that Police officers are kept appraised of developments in mental health cases and how this crucially will inform, and sometimes correct custom and practice. This article in three parts aims firstly to refresh officer’s knowledge. Second, inform current practice and address practice from recent cases involving the police and mental health patients. Thirdly, and perhaps the most crucial through case examples offer a decision making framework to support operational staff in the right direction for mental health practice and defend practice challenges that may arise at all levels.