• A massively multi-scale approach to characterizing tissue architecture by synchrotron micro-CT applied to the human placenta

      Tun, W. M; Poologasundarampillai, G.; Bischof, H.; Nye, Gareth; King, O. N. F.; Basham, M.; Tokudome, Y.; Lewis, R. M.; Johnstone, E. D.; Brownbill, P; et al. (The Royal Society, 2021-06-02)
      Multi-scale structural assessment of biological soft tissue is challenging but essential to gain insight into structure–function relationships of tissue/organ. Using the human placenta as an example, this study brings together sophisticated sample preparation protocols, advanced imaging and robust, validated machine-learning segmentation techniques to provide the first massively multi-scale and multi-domain information that enables detailed morphological and functional analyses of both maternal and fetal placental domains. Finally, we quantify the scale-dependent error in morphological metrics of heterogeneous placental tissue, estimating the minimal tissue scale needed in extracting meaningful biological data. The developed protocol is beneficial for high-throughput investigation of structure–function relationships in both normal and diseased placentas, allowing us to optimize therapeutic approaches for pathological pregnancies. In addition, the methodology presented is applicable in the characterization of tissue architecture and physiological behaviours of other complex organs with similarity to the placenta, where an exchange barrier possesses circulating vascular and avascular fluid spaces.
    • A pilot randomised controlled trial of a programme of psychosocial interventions (Resettle) for high risk personality disordered offenders

      Nathan, Rajan; Centifanti, Luna; Baker, Vikki; Hill, Jonathan (Elsevier, 2019-07-08)
      Abstract Background Offenders with personality disorder experience significant co-morbid mental health problems and present with an increased risk of offending. The evidence for the effectiveness of interventions for personality disordered offenders in the community is limited. This study was a pilot study to determine the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of an intervention known as Resettle for personality disordered offenders and to explore the possible effects of this intervention. Methods Potential participants were recruited from referrals of male prisoners to Resettle. Those consenting underwent baseline assessments before being randomised to Resettle or treatment as usual. Officially recorded and self-report offending was assessed over two years following release from custody. Of the 110 eligible participants, 72 (65%) participated in the study of whom 38 were randomised to Resettle and 34 to treatment as usual. The two groups had a similar psychiatric and offending profile. Results Analysis of officially recorded offences at two years found mixed results, but whether adopting an intent-to-treat approach or including only those who received the intervention there was no clear evidence of an effect of the intervention. A comparison of self-report offending found no effect of Resettle in an intent-to-treat analysis, but there was an effect when the analysis involved only those participating in the intervention. Conclusions This study demonstrated that with some adjustments it was possible to carry out an RCT of a complex intervention for personality disordered offenders in a criminal justice setting. Some, but not conclusive, evidence was found in favour of the intervention.
    • A pilot study of a single intermittent arm cycling exercise programme on people affected by Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD)

      editor: Vousden, George; Philp, Fraser; orcid: 0000-0002-8552-7869; email: f.philp@liverpool.ac.uk; Kulshrestha, Richa; Emery, Nicholas; Arkesteijn, Marco; Pandyan, Anand; Willis, Tracey (Public Library of Science, 2022-06-24)
      For patients affected by Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD), alternate methods for increasing physical activity engagement that may benefit shoulder function and wider health are needed. Arm cycling has been proposed as a potential method for achieving this although dosage parameters and evidence is limited. The aim of this study was to conduct a pilot study evaluating the effect of a single intermittent arm cycling exercise programme on people affected by FSHD. People with confirmed genetic diagnosis of FSHD between the ages 18–60 years were recruited to attend a single session for the exercise intervention (5 exercise efforts lasting 2 minutes each with 30 seconds of rest between each effort). Prior to exercise, measures of shoulder function (Oxford shoulder score), strength and range of movement were recorded. During the exercise participants were video recorded to quantify range of movement and extract movement profile features. Participants comments were recorded and followed up four days later to check for adverse events. Fifteen participants, (6F:9M) were recruited with median (IQR) Oxford Shoulder Scores of 25 (18 to 39). All participants successfully completed the exercise intervention with only transient symptoms consistent with exercise being reported and achieving a median (IQR) rate of perceived exertion scores of 13 (12 to 13). Movement profile data was available for 12 out of 15 participants and suggests that exercise intensity did not compromise movement. An association between strength and shoulder function (R2 = 0.5147), Rate of perceived exertion (RPE) of the final effort against shoulder function and strength (R2 = 0.2344 and 0.1743 respectively) was identified. Participant comments were positive regarding the exercise intervention. Our study demonstrates that an intermittent arm cycling programme is feasible for people affected by FSHD. Further work is needed to evaluate physiological responses to exercise across variations in programme variables and equipment set up in a larger sample of people affected by FSHD.
    • A preliminary cohort study assessing routine blood analyte levels and neurological outcome following spinal cord injury.

      Brown, Sharon J.; Bernardo, Harrington; Hulme, Charlotte; Morris, Rachel; Bennett, Anna; Tsang, Wai-Hung; Osman, Aheed; Chowdhury, Joy; Kumar, Naveen; Wright, Karina T. (2019-07-16)
      There is increasing interest in the identification of biomarkers that could predict neurological outcome following a spinal cord injury (SCI). Although initial American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grade is a good indicator of neurological outcome, for the patient and clinicians, an element of uncertainty remains. This preliminary study aimed to assess the additive potential of routine blood analytes following Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to develop prognostic models for neurological outcome following spinal cord injury. Routine blood and clinical data were collected from SCI patients (n=82) and PCA used to reduce the number of blood analytes into related factors. Outcome neurology was obtained from AIS scores at 3- and 12-months post-injury, with Motor (AIS and Total including all myotomes) and Sensory (AIS, Touch and Pain) being assessed individually. Multiple regression models were created for all outcome measures. Blood analytes relating to 'liver function' and 'acute inflammation and liver function' factors were found to significantly increase prediction of neurological outcome at both 3 months (Touch, Pain and AIS Sensory) and at 1 year (Pain, R2 increased by 0.025 and Total Motor, R2 increased by 0.016). For some models 'liver function' and 'acute inflammation and liver function' factors were both significantly predictive with the greatest combined R2 improvement of 0.043 occurring for 3m Pain prediction. These preliminary findings support ongoing research into the use of routine blood analytes in the prediction of neurological outcome in SCI patients.
    • Accelerated and efficient neuronal differentiation of Sox1GFP mouse embryonic stem cells in vitro using nicotinamide

      Griffin, Sile; Pickard, Mark R.; Fricker, Rosemary; Keele University, United Kingdom (NECTAR (Network of European CNS Transplantation and Restoration) 24th Annual Meeting, 27/28th November 2014, Galway, Ireland, 2014)
      A major challenge for advancement of clinical neuronal replacement therapies is the production of high yields of purified neuronal populations of appropriate phenotype with control over proliferation to prevent tumorigenesis. We previously reported that treatment of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC;46CSox1GFP reporter cell line) monolayer cultures with the vitamin B3 metabolite nicotinamide at the early onset of development not only increased the efficiency of neuronal generation by two-fold but also enriched the ratio of purified neurons to non-neuronal cells in culture. This study aimed to investigate if nicotinamide enhances neural induction in this model and whether it also promotes the production/differentiation of specific neuronal subtypes. To address these aims, monolayer mESC cultures were treated with nicotinamide (10 mM) for different durations and immunocytochemistry/fluorescence microscopy was performed to assess the expression of stem cell, neural progenitor (NP) and neuronal subtype markers. Morphometric analyses were also performed to assess the extent of differentiation. Nicotinamide treatment significantly decreased Oct4+ pluripotent cells and concomitantly increased GFP+ cells at day 4, suggesting enhanced neural lineage commitment. By day 14, nicotinamide treatment (from day 0-7) reduced both Oct4+ and GFP expression concomitant with enhanced expression of neuron-specific β-tubulin, indicative of accelerated neuronal differentiation. Nicotinamide selectively enhanced the production of catecholaminergic, serotonergic and GABAergic neurons and, moreover, enhanced various aspects of neuronal morphology and maturation. Collectively, these data demonstrate a direct effect of nicotinamide at the initial stages of embryonic stem cell differentiation which could be critical for rapidly andefficiently promoting neural commitment to highly enriched neuronal lineages. The strong clinical potential of nicotinamide could successfully be applied to future neural cell-based therapies including Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease, both to eradicate proliferating cells and for a more enhanced and specific differentiation
    • Acute glycaemic management before, during and after exercise for cardiac rehabilitation participants with diabetes mellitus; a joint statement of the British and Canadian Associations of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, the International Council for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation and the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences

      Buckley, J.P.; Riddell, Michael; Mellor, Duane; Bracken, Richard; Ross, Marie-Kristelle; LaGerche, Andre; Poirier, Paul; University of Chester; University College London; York University, Toronto; LMC Healthcare; Aston University; Swansea University College of Engineering; Laval University; Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute; St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne; Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec (BMJ, 2020-12-23)
      Type 1 (T1) and type 2 (T2) diabetes mellitus (DM) are significant precursors and comorbidities to cardiovascular disease and prevalence of both types is still rising globally. Currently,~25% of participants (and rising) attending cardiac rehabilitation in Europe, North America and Australia have been reported to have DM (>90% have T2DM). While there is some debate over whether improving glycaemic control in those with heart disease can independently improve future cardiovascular health-related outcomes, for the individual patient whose blood glucose is well controlled, it can aid the exercise programme in being more efficacious. Good glycaemic management not only helps to mitigate the risk of acute glycaemic events during exercising, it also aids in achieving the requisite physiological and psycho-social aims of the exercise component of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). These benefits are strongly associated with effective behaviour change, including increased enjoyment, adherence and self-efficacy. It is known that CR participants with DM have lower uptake and adherence rates compared with those without DM. This expert statement provides CR practitioners with nine recommendations aimed to aid in the participant’s improved blood glucose control before, during and after exercise so as to prevent the risk of glycaemic events that could mitigate their beneficial participation.
    • Adherence to Pre-operative Exercise and the Response to Prehabilitation in Oesophageal Cancer Patients

      Halliday, Laura; Doganay, Emre; Winter-Blyth, Venetia; Osbourne, Hayley; Buckley, John P; Moorthy, Krishna; Imperial College London, University Centre Shrewsbury/Chester (Springer, 2020-04-20)
      BACKGROUND: Prehabilitation is thought to reduce post-operative respiratory complications by optimising fitness before surgery. This prospective, single-centre study aimed to establish the effect of pre-operative exercise on cardiorespiratory fitness in oesophageal cancer patients and characterise the effect of adherence and weekly physical activity on response to prehabilitation. METHODS: Patients received a personalised, home-based pre-operative exercise programme and self-reported their adherence each week. Cardiorespiratory fitness (pVO2max and O2 pulse) was assessed at diagnosis, following completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and immediately before surgery. Study outcomes included changes in fitness and post-operative pneumonia. RESULTS: Sixty-seven patients with oesophageal cancer underwent prehabilitation followed by surgery between January 2016 and December 2018. Fitness was preserved during NAC and then increased prior to surgery (pV02max Δ = +2.6 ml min-1, 95% CI 1.2-4.0 p = 0.001; O2 pulse Δ = +1.4 ml beat-1 95% CI 0.5-2.3 p = 0.001). Patients with higher baseline fitness completed more physical activity. Regression analyses found adherence was associated with improvement in fitness immediately before surgery (p = 0.048), and the amount of physical activity completed was associated with the risk of post-operative pneumonia (p = 0.035). CONCLUSION: Pre-operative exercise can maintain cardiorespiratory fitness during NAC and facilitate an increase in fitness before surgery. Greater exercise volumes were associated with a lower risk of post-operative pneumonia, highlighting the importance progressing exercise programmes throughout prehabilitation. Patients with high baseline fitness completed more physical activity and may require less supervision to reach their exercise goals. Further research is needed to explore stratified approaches to prehabilitation. KEYWORDS: Exercise therapy; Oesophageal cancer; Pre-operative care; Surgery
    • Age-related changes in microRNAs expression in cruciate ligaments of wild-stock house mice

      Nye, Gareth; Kharaz, Yalda; Goljanek‐Whysall, Katarzyna; Hurst, Jane; McArdle, Anne; Comerford, Eithne; University of Chester; University of Liverpool
      Cruciate ligaments (CL) of the knee joint are injured following trauma or aging. MicroRNAs (miRs) are potential therapeutic targets in musculoskeletal disorders, but there is little known about the role of miRs and their expression ligaments during aging. This study aimed to (1) identify if mice with normal physical activity, wild-stock house mice are an appropriate model to study age-related changes in the knee joint and (2) investigate the expression of miRs in aging murine cruciate ligaments. Knee joints were collected from 6 and 24 months old C57BL/6 and wild-stock house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) for ligament and cartilage (OARSI) histological analysis. Expression of miR targets in CLs was determined in 6-, 12-, 24-, and 30-month-old wild-stock house mice, followed by the analysis of predicted mRNA target genes and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Higher CL and knee OARSI histological scores were found in 24-month-old wild-stock house mice compared with 6- and 24-month-old C57BL/6 and 6-month-old wild-stock house mice (p < 0.05). miR-29a and miR-34a were upregulated in 30-month-old wild-stock house mice in comparison with 6-, 12-, and 24-month-old wild-stock house mice (p < 0.05). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis on miR-29a and 34a targets was associated with inflammation through interleukins, TGFβ and Notch genes, and p53 signaling. Collagen type I alpha 1 chain (COL1A1) correlated negatively with both miR-29a (r = −0.35) and miR-34a (r = −0.33). The findings of this study support wild-stock house mice as an appropriate aging model for the murine knee joint. This study also indicated that miR-29a and miR-34a may be potential regulators of COL1A1 gene expression in murine CLs.
    • Alignment of multiple glial cell populations in 3D nanofiber scaffolds: toward the development of multicellular implantable scaffolds for repair of neural injury

      Weightman, Alan P.; Jenkins, Stuart I.; Pickard, Mark R.; Chari, Divya M.; Yang, Ying; Keele University, United Kingdom (Elsevier, 2014-02)
      Non-neuronal cells of the central nervous system (CNS), termed "neuroglia," play critical roles in neural regeneration; therefore, replacement of glial populations via implantable nanofabricated devices (providing a growth-permissive niche) is a promising strategy to enhance repair. Most constructs developed to date have lacked three-dimensionality, multiple glial populations and control over spatial orientations, limiting their ability to mimic in vivo neurocytoarchitecture. We describe a facile technique to incorporate multiple glial cell populations [astrocytes, oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) and oligodendrocytes] within a three-dimensional (3D) nanofabricated construct. Highly aligned nanofibers could induce elongation of astrocytes, while OPC survival, elongation and maturation required pre-aligned astrocytes. The potential to scale-up the numbers of constituent nanofiber layers is demonstrated with astrocytes. Such complex implantable constructs with multiple glial sub-populations in defined 3D orientations could represent an effective approach to reconstruct glial circuitry in neural injury sites.
    • Alzheimer’s Amyloidopathy: An Alternative Aspect

      Regland, Björn; McCaddon, Andrew (IOS Press, 2019-03-29)
    • Anti-epileptic drugs and bone loss: phenytoin reduces pro-collagen I and alters the electrophoretic mobility of osteonectin in cultured bone cells.

      Wilson, Emma L.; Garton, Mark; Fuller, Heidi R.; RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital; RJAH Orthopaedic NHS Foundation Trust; Keele University (Elsevier, 2016-05-31)
      Phenytoin is an antiepileptic drug used in the management of partial and tonic-clonic seizures. In previous studies we have shown that valproate, another antiepileptic drug, reduced the amount of two key bone proteins, pro-collagen I and osteonectin (SPARC, BM-40), in both skin fibroblasts and cultured osteoblast-like cells. Here we show that phenytoin also reduces pro-collagen I production in osteoblast-like cells, but does not appear to cause a decrease in osteonectin message or protein production. Instead, a 24h exposure to a clinically relevant concentration of phenytoin resulted in a dose-dependent change in electrophoretic mobility of osteonectin, which was suggestive of a change in post-translational modification status. The perturbation of these important bone proteins could be one of the mechanisms to explain the bone loss that has been reported following long-term treatment with phenytoin.
    • Attitudes of Female Warders towards inmate who self-harm: A pilot Exploratory Study from an Inner-city Prison in South India

      Jones, Steven; Kumar, Pradeep; Eost-Telling, Charlotte; Kirshna, Murali; University of Chester (The Indian Society of Criminology; National Law University Delhi, 2020-07-01)
      Self-harm is a global public health challenge. The management and treatment of those who self-harm is emotionally challenging, and can sometimes manifest in negative attitudes amongst staff who provide care. Health professional’s attitudes towards deliberate self-harm have been studied globally, however, evidence regarding prison staff attitudes is sparse, and particularly lacking in India. The primary aim of this study was to explore the attitudes of female prison warders towards prison inmates who self-harm in an Indian setting. A cross-sectional survey using a questionnaire to measure knowledge and attitudes was administered to prison warders from one city prison in South India. Out of the 210 approached to participate, 170 female warders completed the survey questionnaire. In general, sociodemographic factors of the prison warders were unrelated to their attitudes towards self-harm, and a negligible few had received any training specific to self-harm. A series of educational and skills recommendations have been developed from the study, which can be used to inform intervention initiatives and further, provide a basis for cross-cultural professional comparison studies. Current resources, cultures, practice and context must be considered in any future interventions aimed at progressing the evidence base further. In addition, training and education for staff should include information on knowledge and attitudes about causes, reasons, motivations, forms and purpose of self-harm. Records of staff responses to those who self-harm, irrespective of setting, should include assessment, management, interventions undertaken and incorporated daily practice. Importantly, this work may influence prisoner treatment outcomes and is worthy of further study.
    • Attitudes of general hospital staff towards patients who self-harm in South India: A cross-sectional study

      Kumar, Narendra; Rajendra, Rajagopal; Majgi, Sumanth M.; Krishna, Murali; Keenan, Paul; Jones, Steven; University of Chester (Medknow, 2016-11-30)
      Background: There is growing global interest into the attitudes and clinical management of persons who deliberately self-harm. People who self-harm experience many problems and typically have many needs related to management of their psychological wellbeing. A positive attitude amongst general hospital staff should prevail with people who self-harm. The principal purpose was to determine student staff attitudes towards patients who self-harmed from a professional and cultural perspective, which might influence patient treatment following hospital admission. The focus concentrated upon staff knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding self-harm. Methods: A cross sectional survey of the hospital staff using a validated questionnaire was carried out. This paper reports on interdisciplinary staff from two large general hospitals in Mysuru, South India (n=773). Results: Findings suggest that within a general hospital setting there is wide variation in staff attitudes and knowledge levels related to self-harm. Whilst there is attitudinal evidence for staff attitudes, this study investigates interprofessional differences in an attempt to progress treatment approaches to a vulnerable societal group. Very few staff had any training in assessment of self harm survivors. Conclusion: There is an urgent need for training general hospital staff in self harm assessment and prevention in south India. The results allow a series of recommendations for educational and skills initiatives before progressing to patient assessment and treatment projects and opens potential for cross cultural comparison studies. In addition, interventions must focus on current resources and contexts to move the evidence base and approaches to patient care forward.
    • An Audit on the Adherence to Antipsychotic Prescription Policy for the Management of Delirium in the Medical Wards.

      Simiyon, Manjula; Loo, Jiann; Baker, Catherine; Lepping, Peter; Jones, Steven; Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board; University of Chester (Cambridge University Press, 2022-06-20)
      This audit aimed to assess the adherence to the antipsychotic policy for delirium in the medical wards. It aimed to assess compliance with each of the guidelines mentioned in the health board’s policy which is based on the National Institute for Health and Cares Excellence (NICE) guidelines.
    • Autologous chondrocyte implantation-derived synovial fluids display distinct responder and non-responder proteomic profiles

      Hulme, Charlotte H.; Wilson, Emma L.; Peffers, Mandy J.; Roberts, Sally; Simpson, Deborah M.; Richardson, James B.; Gallacher, Pete; Wright, Karina T.; Keele University; Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital; University of Chester; University of Liverpool (BioMed Central, 2017-06-30)
      Background Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) can be used in the treatment of focal cartilage injuries to prevent the onset of osteoarthritis (OA). However, we are yet to understand fully why some individuals do not respond well to this intervention. Identification of a reliable and accurate biomarker panel that can predict which patients are likely to respond well to ACI is needed in order to assign the patient to the most appropriate therapy. This study aimed to compare the baseline and mid-treatment proteomic profiles of synovial fluids (SFs) obtained from responders and non-responders to ACI. Methods SFs were derived from 14 ACI responders (mean Lysholm improvement of 33 (17–54)) and 13 non-responders (mean Lysholm decrease of 14 (4–46)) at the two stages of surgery (cartilage harvest and chondrocyte implantation). Label-free proteome profiling of dynamically compressed SFs was used to identify predictive markers of ACI success or failure and to investigate the biological pathways involved in the clinical response to ACI. Results Only 1 protein displayed a ≥2.0-fold differential abundance in the preclinical SF of ACI responders versus non-responders. However, there is a marked difference between these two groups with regard to their proteome shift in response to cartilage harvest, with 24 and 92 proteins showing ≥2.0-fold differential abundance between Stages I and II in responders and non-responders, respectively. Proteomic data has been uploaded to ProteomeXchange (identifier: PXD005220). We have validated two biologically relevant protein changes associated with this response, demonstrating that matrix metalloproteinase 1 was prominently elevated and S100 calcium binding protein A13 was reduced in response to cartilage harvest in non-responders. Conclusions The differential proteomic response to cartilage harvest noted in responders versus non-responders is completely novel. Our analyses suggest several pathways which appear to be altered in non-responders that are worthy of further investigation to elucidate the mechanisms of ACI failure. These protein changes highlight many putative biomarkers that may have potential for prediction of ACI treatment success.
    • Basement membrane ligands initiate distinct signalling networks to direct cell shape

      Randles, Michael; Lausecker, Franziska; Humphries, Jonathan D.; Byron, Adam; Clark, Simon J.; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Zent, Roy; Humphries, Martin J.; Lennon, Rachel; The University of Manchester; University of Edinburgh; Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen; Washington University School of Medicine; Vanderbilt University Medical Center; Royal Manchester Children's Hospital; Manchester Academic Health Science Centre; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2020-03-06)
      Cells have evolved mechanisms to sense the composition of their adhesive microenvironment. Although much is known about general mechanisms employed by adhesion receptors to relay signals between the extracellular environment and the cytoskeleton, the nuances of ligand-specific signalling remain undefined. Here, we investigated how glomerular podocytes, and four other basement membrane-associated cell types, respond morphologically to different basement membrane ligands. We defined the composition of the respective adhesion complexes using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. On type IV collagen, all epithelial cell types adopted a round morphology, with a single lamellipodium and large adhesion complexes rich in actin-binding proteins. On laminin (511 or 521), all cell types attached to a similar degree but were polygonal in shape with small adhesion complexes enriched in endocytic and microtubule-binding proteins. Consistent with their distinctive morphologies, cells on type IV collagen exhibited high Rac1 activity, while those on laminin had elevated PKCa. Perturbation of PKCa was able to interchange morphology consistent with a key role for this pathway in matrix ligand-specific signalling. Therefore, this study defines the switchable basement membrane adhesome and highlights two key signalling pathways within the systems that determine distinct cell morphologies. Proteomic data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD017913.
    • Bone extracts can stimulate the secrtion of osteoprotegerin in the osteosarcoma cell lines MG-63 and SAOS-2

      Powell, Diane E.; Johnson, William Eustace Basil; Marshall, Michael J.; Williams, John H. H.; Davie, Michael W. J. (American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 2005)
    • Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Become Antiangiogenic When Chondrogenically or Osteogenically Differentiated: Implications for Bone and Cartilage Tissue Engineering

      Bara, Jennifer J.; Johnson, William Eustace Basil; Roberts, Sally; McCarthy, Helen E.; Humphrey, Emma; AO Institute, Davos, Switzerland; Aston University; Keele University
      Osteochondral tissue repair requires formation of vascularized bone and avascular cartilage. Mesenchymal stem cells stimulate angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo but it is not known if these proangiogenic properties change as a result of chondrogenic or osteogenic differentiation. We investigated the angiogenic/antiangiogenic properties of equine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (eBMSCs) before and after differentiation in vitro. Conditioned media from chondrogenic and osteogenic cell pellets and undifferentiated cells was applied to endothelial tube formation assays using Matrigel. Additionally, the cell secretome was analysed using LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry and screened for angiogenesis and neurogenesis-related factors using protein arrays. Endothelial tube-like formation was supported by conditioned media from undifferentiated eBMSCs. Conversely, chondrogenic and osteogenic conditioned media was antiangiogenic as shown by significantly decreased length of endothelial tube-like structures and degree of branching compared to controls. Undifferentiated cells produced higher levels of angiogenesis-related proteins compared to chondrogenic and osteogenic pellets. In summary, eBMSCs produce an array of angiogenesis-related proteins and support angiogenesis in vitro via a paracrine mechanism. However, when these cells are differentiated chondrogenically or osteogenically, they produce a soluble factor(s) that inhibits angiogenesis. With respect to osteochondral tissue engineering, this may be beneficial for avascular articular cartilage formation but unfavourable for bone formation where a vascularized tissue is desired.
    • c-Myc inhibition decreases CIP2A and reduces BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase activity in chronic myeloid leukemia.

      Lucas, Claire; Harris, Robert; Giannoudis, Athina; Clark, Richard; University of Liverpool, Royal Liverpool University hospital (Ferrata Storti Foundation, 2015-05-01)
      NA
    • Ca

      Wong, Vincent K-W.; Qiu, Congling; Xu, Su-Wei; Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Zeng, Wu; Wang, Hui; Michelangeli, Francesco; Dias, Ivo Ricardo De Seabra Rodrigues; Qu, Yuan Qing; Chan, Tsz Wai; et al. (2019-05-23)
      Celastrol exhibits anti-arthritic effect in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but the role of celastrol-mediated Ca mobilization in treatment of RA remains unelucidated. Here, we illustrate the regulatory role of celastrol-induced Ca signalling in synovial fibroblasts of RA patients and adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rats. Molecular target of celastrol was determined by computational docking, Ca dynamic and functional assays on SERCA. Ca -mediated autophagy in RASFs/RAFLS and the underlying mechanism were verified by quantification of endogenous LC3-II puncta, immunoblotting, and flow cytometry with the Ca chelator (BAPTA/AM) or suitable inhibitors. The anti-arthritic effect of celastrol, autophagy induction and growth rate of synovial fibroblasts in AIA rats were monitored by microCT and immunofluorescence staining. mRNA from joint tissues of AIA rats was isolated for transcriptional analysis of inflammatory genes. The role of Ca in regulating the identified genes was investigated by knockdown of calmodulin, calpains, and calcineurin. Celastrol inhibited SERCA to induce autophagy-dependent cytotoxicity in RASFs/RAFLS via CaMKKβ-AMPK-mTOR pathway and repressed arthritis symptoms in AIA rats. BAPTA/AM hampered the in vitro and in vivo effectiveness of celastrol. Inflammatory- and autoimmunity-associated genes downregulated by celastrol in joint tissues of AIA rat were restored by BAPTA/AM. Knockdown of calmodulin, calpains, and calcineurin in RAFLS confirmed the role of Ca in celastrol-regulated gene expression. Celastrol triggered Ca signalling to induce autophagic cell death in RASFs/RAFLS and ameliorated arthritis in AIA rats mediated by calcium-dependent/-binding proteins facilitating the exploitation of anti-arthritic drugs based on manipulation of Ca signalling. [Abstract copyright: This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.]