• Cardiac Rehabilitation Delivery Model for Low-Resource Settings: An International Council of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation Consensus Statement

      Grace, Sherry L.; Turk-Adawi, Karam I.; Contractor, Aashish; Atrey, Alison; Campbell, Norman R. C.; Derman, Wayne; Ghisi, Gabriela L. M.; Sarkar, Bidyut K.; Yeo, Tee J.; Lopez-Jimenenez, Francisco; et al. (Elsevier, 2016-08-17)
      Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a global epidemic, which is largely preventable. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is demonstrated to be efficacious and cost-effective for secondary prevention in high-income countries. Given its affordability, CR should be more broadly implemented in middle-income countries as well. Hence, the International Council of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation (ICCPR) convened a writing panel to recommend strategies to deliver all core CR components in low-resource settings, namely: (1) initial assessment, (2) lifestyle risk factor management (i.e., diet, tobacco, mental health), (3) medical risk factor management (lipids, blood pressure), (4) education for self-management; (5) return to work; and (6) outcome evaluation. Approaches to delivering these components in alternative, arguably lower-cost settings, such as the home, community and primary care, are provided. Recommendations on delivering each of these components where the most-responsible CR provider is a non-physician, such as an allied healthcare professional or community health care worker, are also provided.
    • The efficacy of using Appropriate Paper-based Technology postural support devices in Kenyan children with Cerebral Palsy

      Barton, Catherine; Buckley, John P.; Samia, Pauline; Williams, Fiona; Taylor, Sue; Lindoewood, Rachel; University Centre Shrewsbury - University of Chester
      Purpose: Appropriate paper-based technology (APT) is used to provide postural support for children with cerebral palsy (CP) in low-resourced settings. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the impact of APT on the children’s and families’ lives. Materials and methods: A convenience sample of children with CP and their families participated. Inclusion was based on the Gross Motor Function Classification System levels IV and V. APT seating or standing frames were provided for six months. A mixed methods impact of APT devices on the children and families included the Family Impact Assistive Technology Scale for Adaptive Seating (FIATS-AS); the Child Engagement in Daily Life (CEDL) questionnaire; and a qualitative assessment from diary/log and semi-structured interviews. Results: Ten children (median 3 years, range 9 months - 7 years). Baseline to follow-up median (IQR) FIATS-AS were: 22.7 (9.3) and 30.3 (10.2), respectively (p = 0.002). Similarly mean (SD) CEDL scores for “frequency” changed from 30.5 (13.2) to 42.08 (5.96) (p=0.021) and children’s enjoyment scores from 2.23 (0.93) to 2.91 (0.79) (p = 0.019). CEDL questionnaire for self-care was not discriminatory; seven families scored zero at both baseline and 6 months. Qualitative interviews revealed three key findings; that APT improved functional ability, involvement/interaction in daily-life situations, and a reduced family burden of care. Conclusion: APT devices used in Kenyan children with non-ambulant CP had a meaningful positive effect on both the children’s and their families’ lives.
    • Heart rate and perceived muscle pain responses to a functional walking test in McArdle disease

      Buckley, John P.; Quinlivan, Ros M.; Sim, Julius; Short, Deborah S.; Eston, Roger (Routledge, 2014-04-14)
      The aim of this study was to assess a 12-min self-paced walking test in patients with McArdle disease. Twenty patients (44.7 ±11 years; 11 female) performed the walking test where walking speed, distance walked, heart rate (HR) and perceived muscle pain (Borg CR10 scale) were measured. Median (interquartile range) distance walked was 890 m (470–935). From 1 to 6 min, median walking speed decreased (from 75.0 to 71.4 m∙min–1) while muscle pain and %HR reserve increased (from 0.3 to 3.0 and 37% to 48%, respectively). From 7 to 12 min, walking speed increased to 74.2 m∙min–1, muscle pain decreased to 1.6 and %HR reserve remained between 45% and 48%. To make relative comparisons, HR and muscle pain were divided by walking speed and expressed as ratios. These ratios rose significantly between 1 and 6 min (HR:walking speed P = .001 and pain:walking speed P < .001) and similarly decreased between 6 and 11 min (P = .002 and P = .001, respectively). Peak ratios of HR:walking speed and pain:walking speed were inversely correlated to distance walked: rs (HR) = −.82 (P < .0001) and rs (pain) = −.55 (P = .012). Largest peak ratios were found in patients who walked < 650 m. A 12-min walking test can be used to assess exercise capacity and detect the second wind in McArdle disease.
    • Office workers’ experiences of attempts to reduce sitting-time: An exploratory, mixed- methods uncontrolled intervention pilot study

      Dewitt, Stephen; Hall, Jennifer; Smith, Lee; Buckley, John P.; Biddle, Stuart J. H.; Mansfield, Louise; Gardner, Benjamin; University of Chester (BMC Springer Nature, 2019-06-25)
      Background: Office workers typically sit for most of the workday, which has been linked to physical and mental ill- health and premature death. This mixed-methods study sought to identify barriers and facilitators to reducing sitting and increasing standing among office workers who received an intervention prototype (the ‘ReSiT [Reducing Sitting Time] Study’). The intervention comprised a sit-stand workstation and tailored advice to enhance motivation, capability and opportunity to displace sitting with standing. Methods: Twenty-nine UK university office workers (aged ≥18y, working ≥3 days per week, most time spent at a seated desk) participated in a 13-week uncontrolled study. They were initially monitored for one-week. In a subsequent face-to-face consultation, participants received sitting time feedback from a prior one-week monitoring period, and selected from a set of tailored sitting-reduction techniques. Quantitative data comprising sitting, standing and stepping time, which were objectively monitored for 7 consecutive days across three post- intervention timepoints, were descriptively analysed. Qualitative data, from semi-structured interviews conducted at 1, 6 and 12-weeks post-intervention, were thematically analysed. Results: Compared to baseline, mean sitting time decreased at weeks 1, 6 and 12 by 49.7mins, 118.2mins, and 109.7mins respectively. Despite prior concerns about colleagues’ reactions to standing, many reported encouragement from others, and standing could be equally conducive to social interaction or creating private, personal space. Some perceived less cognitively-demanding tasks to be more conducive to standing, though some found standing offered a valued break from challenging tasks. Participants prioritised workload over sitting reduction and were more likely to stand after rather than during work task completion. Temporary context changes, such as holidays, threatened to derail newfound routines. Conclusions: Our findings emphasise the importance of understanding workers’ mental representations of their work, and the social functions of sitting and standing in the workplace. Workplace intervention developers should incorporate a pre-intervention sitting time monitoring period, encourage workers to identify personally meaningful tasks and cues for standing, and build organisational support for sitting-reduction. We will use these insights to refine our intervention for self-administered delivery. Trial registration: ISRCTN29395780 (registered 21 November 2016). Keywords: Sedentary behaviour, Workplace, Qualitative, Occupational health
    • Oxygen Costs of the Incremental Shuttle Walk Test in Cardiac Rehabilitation Participants: An Historical and Contemporary Analysis

      Buckley, John P.; Cardoso, Fernando M. F.; Birkett, Stefan T.; Sandercock, Gavin R. H.; University Centre Shrewsbury (Springer, 2016-04-07)
      Background The incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) is a standardised assessment for cardiac rehabilitation. Three studies have reported oxygen costs (VO2)/metabolic equivalents (METs) of the ISWT. In spite of classic rep- resentations from these studies graphically showing curvilinear VO2 responses to incremented walking speeds, linear regression techniques (also used by the American College of Sports Medicine [ACSM]) have been used to estimate VO2. Purpose The two main aims of this study were to (i) re- solve currently reported discrepancies in the ISWT VO2- walking speed relationship, and (ii) derive an appropriate VO2 versus walking speed regression equation. Methods VO2 was measured continuously during an ISWT in 32 coronary heart disease [cardiac] rehabilitation (CHD-CR) participants and 30 age-matched controls. Results Both CHD-CR and control group VO2 responses were curvilinear in nature. For CHD-CR VO2 = 4.4- e0.23 9 walkingspeed (km/h). The integrated area under the curve (iAUC) VO2 across nine ISWT stages was greater in the CHD-CR group versus the control group (p \ 0.001): & John P. Buckley j.buckley@chester.ac.uk 1 (±86) ml􏰀kg-1􏰀min-1􏰀km􏰀h-1; con- trol = 316 (±52) ml􏰀kg-1􏰀min-1􏰀km􏰀h-1. Conclusions CHD-CR group vs. control VO2 was up to 30 % greater at higher ISWT stages. The curvilinear nature of VO2 responses during the ISWT concur with classic studies reported over 100 years. VO2 estimates for walking using linear regression models (including the ACSM) clearly underestimate values in healthy and CHD-CR par- ticipants, and this study provides a resolution to this when the ISWT is used for CHD-CR populations.
    • Promoting patient utilization of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: A joint International Council and Canadian Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation position statement

      Santiago de Araújo Pio, Carolina; Varnfield, Marlien; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Beckie, Theresa M.; Babu, Abraham S.; Baidya, Sumana; Buckley, John P.; Chen, Ssu-Yuan; Gagliardi, Anna; Heine, Martin; et al. (Elsevier, 2019-07-04)
      Background: Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) is a recommendation in international clinical practice guidelines given its’ benefits, however use is suboptimal. The purpose of this position statement was to translate evidence on interventions that increase CR enrolment and adherence into implementable recommendations. Methods: The writing panel was constituted by representatives of societies internationally concerned with preventive cardiology, and included disciplines that would be implementing the recommendations. Patient partners served, as well as policy-makers. The statement was developed in accordance with AGREE II, among other guideline checklists. Recommendations were based on our update of the Cochrane review on interventions to promote patient utilization of CR. These were circulated to panel members, who were asked to rate each on a 7-point Likert scale in terms of scientific acceptability, actionability, and feasibility of assessment. A web call was convened to achieve consensus and confirm strength of the recommendations (based on GRADE). The draft underwent external review and public comment. Results: The 3 drafted recommendations were that to increase enrolment, healthcare providers, particularly nurses (strong), should promote CR to patients face-to-face (strong), and that to increase adherence part of CR could be delivered remotely (weak). Ratings for the 3 recommendations were 5.95±0.69 (mean ± standard deviation), 5.33±1.12 and 5.64±1.08, respectively. Conclusions: Interventions can significantly increase utilization of CR, and hence should be widely applied. We call upon cardiac care institutions to implement these strategies to augment CR utilization, and to ensure CR programs are adequately resourced to serve enrolling patients and support them to complete programs.
    • The ReSiT study (reducing sitting time): rationale and protocol for an exploratory pilot study of an intervention to reduce sitting time among office workers

      Gardner, Benjamin; Dewitt, Stephen; Smith, Lee; Biddle, Stuart J. H.; Mansfield, Louise; Buckley, John P.; University Centre Shrewsbury (BMC, 2017-11-28)
      Background: Desk-based workers engage in long periods of uninterrupted sitting time, which has been associated with morbidity and premature mortality. Previous workplace intervention trials have demonstrated the potential of providing sit-stand workstations, and of administering motivational behaviour change techniques, for reducing sitting time. Yet, few studies have combined these approaches or explored the acceptability of discrete sitting-reduction behaviour change strategies. This paper describes the rationale for a sitting-reduction intervention that combines sit-stand workstations with motivational techniques, and procedures for a pilot study to explore the acceptability of core intervention components among university office workers. Methods: The intervention is based on a theory and evidence-based analysis of why office workers sit, and how best to reduce sitting time. It seeks to enhance motivation and capability, as well as identify opportunities, required to reduce sitting time. Thirty office workers will participate in the pilot study. They will complete an initial awareness-raising monitoring and feedback task and subsequently receive a sit-stand workstation for a 12-week period. They will also select from a ‘menu’ of behaviour change techniques tailored to self-declared barriers to sitting reduction, effectively co-producing and personally tailoring their intervention. Interviews at 1, 6, and 12 weeks post-intervention will explore intervention acceptability. Discussion: To our knowledge, this will be the first study to explore direct feedback from office workers on the acceptability of discrete tailored sitting-reduction intervention components that they have received. Participants’ choice of and reflections on intervention techniques will aid identification of strategies suitable for inclusion in the next iteration of the intervention, which will be delivered in a self-administered format to minimise resource burden.
    • The sedentary office: an expert statement on the growing case for change towards better health and productivity

      Buckley, John P.; Hedge, Alan; Yates, Thomas; Copeland, Robert J.; Loosemore, Michael; Hamer, Mark; Bradley, Gavin; Dunstan, David W.; University Centre Shrewsbury (BMJ, 2015-06-01)
      An international group of experts convened to provide guidance for employers to promote the avoidance of prolonged periods of sedentary work. The set of recommendations was developed from the totality of the current evidence, including long-term epidemiological studies and interventional studies of getting workers to stand and/or move more frequently. The evidence was ranked in quality using the four levels of the American College of Sports Medicine. The derived guidance is as follows: for those occupations which are predominantly desk based, workers should aim to initially progress towards accumulating 2 h/day of standing and light activity (light walking) during working hours, eventually progressing to a total accumulation of 4 h/day (prorated to part-time hours). To achieve this, seated-based work should be regularly broken up with standing-based work, the use of sit–stand desks, or the taking of short active standing breaks. Along with other health promotion goals (improved nutrition, reducing alcohol, smoking and stress), companies should also promote among their staff that prolonged sitting, aggregated from work and in leisure time, may significantly and independently increase the risk of cardiometabolic diseases and premature mortality. It is appreciated that these recommendations should be interpreted in relation to the evidence from which they were derived, largely observational and retrospective studies, or short-term interventional studies showing acute cardiometabolic changes. While longer term intervention studies are required, the level of consistent evidence accumulated to date, and the public health context of rising chronic diseases, suggest initial guidelines are justified. We hope these guidelines stimulate future research, and that greater precision will be possible within future iterations.
    • Standards and core components for cardiovascular disease prevention and rehabilitation; BACPR

      Cowie, Aynsley; Buckley, John P.; Doherty, Patrick; Furze, Gill; Hayward, Jo; Jones, Jennifer; Speck, Linda; Dalal, Hayes; Mills, Joseph; University Centre Shrewsbury (BMJ, 2019-01-30)
      In 2017, the British Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation published its official document detailing standards and core components for cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation. Building on the success of previous editions of this document (published in 2007 and 2012), the 2017 update aims to further emphasise to commissioners, clinicians, politicians and the public the importance of robust, quality indicators of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) service delivery. Otherwise, its overall aim remains consistent with the previous publications—to provide a precedent on which all effective cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation programmes are based and a framework for use in assessment of variation in service delivery quality. In this 2017 edition, the previously described seven standards and core components have both been revised to six, with a greater focus on measurable clinical outcomes, audit and certification. The principles within the updated document underpin the six-stage pathway of care for CR, and reflect the extensive evidence base now available within the field. To help improve current services, close collaboration between commissioners and CR providers is advocated, with use of the CR costing tool in financial planning of programmes. The document specifies how quality assurance can be facilitated through local audit, and advocates routine upload of individual-level data to the annual British Heart Foundation National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation, and application for national certification ensuring attainment of a minimum quality standard. Although developed for the UK, these standards and core components may be applicable to other countries.
    • What is the effect of aerobic exercise intensity on cardiorespiratory fitness in those undergoing cardiac rehabilitation? A systematic review with meta-analysis

      Mitchell, Braden L.; Lock, Merilyn J.; Parfitt, Gaynor; Buckley, John P.; Davison, Kade; Eston, Roger; University of South Australia, University Centre Shrewsbury/University of Chester (BMJ, 2018-08-18)
      18 Objective: Assess the role of exercise intensity on changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in 19 patients with cardiac conditions attending exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. 20 Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis. 21 Data sources: MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO and Web of Science. 22 Eligibility criteria for selection: Studies assessing change in CRF (reported as peak oxygen uptake; 23 V̇O2peak) in patients post-myocardial infarction and revascularisation, following exercise-based 24 cardiac rehabilitation. Studies establishing V̇O2peak via symptom-limited exercise test with ventilatory 25 gas analysis and reported intensity of exercise during rehabilitation were included. Studies with 26 mean ejection fraction <40% were excluded. 27 Results: 128 studies including 13,220 patients were included. Interventions were classified as 28 moderate, moderate-to-vigorous or vigorous intensity based on published recommendations. 29 Moderate and moderate-to-vigorous intensity interventions were associated with a moderate 30 increase in relative V̇O2peak (standardised mean difference ± 95% CI = 0.94 ± 0.30 and 0.93 ± 0.17, 31 respectively), and vigorous-intensity exercise with a large increase (1.10 ± 0.25). Moderate and 32 vigorous intensity interventions were associated with moderate improvements in absolute V̇O2peak 33 (0.63 ± 0.34 and 0.93 ± 0.20, respectively), whereas moderate-to-vigorous intensity interventions 34 elicited a large effect (1.27 ± 0.75). Large heterogeneity among studies was observed for all analyses. 35 Subgroup analyses yielded statistically significant, but inconsistent, improvements in CRF. 36 Conclusion: Engagement in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation was associated with significant 37 improvements in both absolute and relative V̇O2peak. Although exercise of vigorous intensity 38 produced the greatest pooled effect for change in relative V̇O2peak, differences in pooled effects 39 between intensities could not be considered clinically meaningful.