• Adherence to Pre-operative Exercise and the Response to Prehabilitation in Oesophageal Cancer Patients

      Halliday, Laura; Doganay, Emre; Winter-Blyth, Venetia; Osbourne, Hayley; Buckley, John P; Moorthy, Krishna; Imperial College London, University Centre Shrewsbury/Chester (Springer, 2020-04-20)
      BACKGROUND: Prehabilitation is thought to reduce post-operative respiratory complications by optimising fitness before surgery. This prospective, single-centre study aimed to establish the effect of pre-operative exercise on cardiorespiratory fitness in oesophageal cancer patients and characterise the effect of adherence and weekly physical activity on response to prehabilitation. METHODS: Patients received a personalised, home-based pre-operative exercise programme and self-reported their adherence each week. Cardiorespiratory fitness (pVO2max and O2 pulse) was assessed at diagnosis, following completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and immediately before surgery. Study outcomes included changes in fitness and post-operative pneumonia. RESULTS: Sixty-seven patients with oesophageal cancer underwent prehabilitation followed by surgery between January 2016 and December 2018. Fitness was preserved during NAC and then increased prior to surgery (pV02max Δ = +2.6 ml min-1, 95% CI 1.2-4.0 p = 0.001; O2 pulse Δ = +1.4 ml beat-1 95% CI 0.5-2.3 p = 0.001). Patients with higher baseline fitness completed more physical activity. Regression analyses found adherence was associated with improvement in fitness immediately before surgery (p = 0.048), and the amount of physical activity completed was associated with the risk of post-operative pneumonia (p = 0.035). CONCLUSION: Pre-operative exercise can maintain cardiorespiratory fitness during NAC and facilitate an increase in fitness before surgery. Greater exercise volumes were associated with a lower risk of post-operative pneumonia, highlighting the importance progressing exercise programmes throughout prehabilitation. Patients with high baseline fitness completed more physical activity and may require less supervision to reach their exercise goals. Further research is needed to explore stratified approaches to prehabilitation. KEYWORDS: Exercise therapy; Oesophageal cancer; Pre-operative care; Surgery
    • Submaximal Exercise Testing in Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Settings (BEST Study)

      Reed, Jennifer L; Cotie, LM; Cole, CA; Harris, Jennifer; Moran, B; Scott, K; Buckley, John P; Pipe, Andrew L; University of Ottawa, University Centre Shrewsbury/Chester
      Abstract BACKGROUND: This study compared changes in measured versus predicted peak aerobic power (V̇O2 peak) following cardiovascular rehabilitation (CR). Peak cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) results were compared to four V̇O2 peak estimation methods: the submaximal modified Bruce treadmill, Astrand-Ryhming cycle ergometer, and Chester step tests, and the Duke Activity Status Index (DASI). METHODS: Adults with cardiovascular disease (CVD) who completed a 12-week CR program were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks follow-up. CPET, the DASI and three subsequent submaximal exercise tests were performed in a random order. RESULTS: Of the 50 adults (age: 57 ± 11 years) who participated, 46 completed the 12-week CR program and exercise tests. At baseline 69, 68, and 38% of the treadmill, step and cycle tests were successfully completed, respectively. At follow-up 67, 80, and 46% of the treadmill, step and cycle tests were successfully completed, respectively. No severe adverse events occurred. Significant improvements in V̇O2 peak were observed with CPET (3.6 ± 5.5 mL.kg-1.min-1, p < 0.001) and the DASI (2.3 ± 4.2 mL.kg-1.min-1, p < 0.001). Bland-Altman plots of the change in V̇O2 peak between CPET and the four V̇O2 peak estimation methods revealed the following: a proportional bias and heteroscedastic 95% limits of agreement (95% LoA) for the treadmill test, and for the cycle and step tests and DASI, mean bias' and 95% LoA of 1.0 mL.kg-1.min-1 (21.3, -19.3), 1.4 mL.kg-1.min-1 (15.0, -12.3) and 1.0 mL.kg-1.min-1 (13.8, -11.8), respectively. CONCLUSION: Given the greater number of successful tests, no serious adverse events and acceptable mean bias, the step test appears to be a valid and safe method for assessing group-level mean changes in V̇O2 peak among patients in CR. The DASI also appears to be a valid and practical questionnaire. Wide limits of agreement, however, limit their use to predict individual-level changes. Copyright © 2020 Reed, Cotie, Cole, Harris, Moran, Scott, Terada, Buckley and Pipe. KEYWORDS: cardiovascular diseases; exercise test; physiology; rehabilitation; submaximal