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dc.contributor.authorDuffett, Mark*
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-15T13:48:09Z
dc.date.available2014-12-15T13:48:09Z
dc.date.issued2014-09-28
dc.identifier.citationIn L. Duits, K. Zwaan, & S. Reijnders, (Eds.), The Ashgate research companion to fan cultures (pp. 163-180). Farnham, United Kingdom: Ashgate.
dc.identifier.isbn9781409455622en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/337178
dc.descriptionUsed by permission of the Publishers from ‘Celebrity: The return of the repressed in fan studies?’, in The Ashgate research companion to fan cultures eds. Linda Duits, Koos Zwaan and Stijn Reijnders (Farnham: Ashgate, 2014), pp. 163–180. Copyright © 2014en
dc.description.abstractThis chapter begins by examining the development of a fan studies mainstream as a process of marginalization of attention to celebrity. It then considers how deductive areas of fan research have also inadequately conceptualized celebrity attachment. Using Gary Boas and Richard Simpkin as examples, the chapter then shows that there are subtle differences between fandom and celebrity following per se. It reaches its climax with a discussion of effervescence: a useful explanatory mechanism from Emile Durkheim’s theory of religion that helps to account for the pleasures of following celebrities. Finally, the chapter contrasts a neo-Durkheimian approach to fandom with some classic and contemporary research on parasocial interaction. I suggest that focusing on fan motivation and affect – perhaps through a refashioning of Durkheim’s work – may help us escape the long shadow of the mass culture critique.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAshgate
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ashgate.com/isbn/9781409455622
dc.subjectmedia fandom
dc.subjectcelebrity
dc.subjectEmile Durkheim
dc.subjectfan studies
dc.titleCelebrity: The return of the repressed in fan studies?
dc.typeBook chapter
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T13:33:15Z
html.description.abstractThis chapter begins by examining the development of a fan studies mainstream as a process of marginalization of attention to celebrity. It then considers how deductive areas of fan research have also inadequately conceptualized celebrity attachment. Using Gary Boas and Richard Simpkin as examples, the chapter then shows that there are subtle differences between fandom and celebrity following per se. It reaches its climax with a discussion of effervescence: a useful explanatory mechanism from Emile Durkheim’s theory of religion that helps to account for the pleasures of following celebrities. Finally, the chapter contrasts a neo-Durkheimian approach to fandom with some classic and contemporary research on parasocial interaction. I suggest that focusing on fan motivation and affect – perhaps through a refashioning of Durkheim’s work – may help us escape the long shadow of the mass culture critique.


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