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dc.contributor.authorHarlow, Elizabeth*
dc.contributor.authorBerg, Elizabeth*
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Jim*
dc.contributor.authorChandler, John*
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-28T16:36:12Z
dc.date.available2014-11-28T16:36:12Z
dc.date.issued2013-07-01
dc.identifier.citationOrganization, 2013, 20, pp. 534-550
dc.identifier.issn1350-5084
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1350508412448222
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/336285
dc.descriptionThis is the author's manuscript of an article published in Archaeological Dialogues. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1350508412448222
dc.description.abstractThis paper considers some of the ways in which neoliberalism, through the processes of managerialism, has impacted on the occupation of social work in Sweden and the UK. It is argued that there are similar implications in both countries, through the managerial drive for increased performance in economy, efficiency and effectiveness, but also in the development of evidence based practice. Whilst the key focus of the paper is on similarities between these two countries, differences are also noted. There is also recognition of the way in which resistance to the reconfiguration of social work is taking shape.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://org.sagepub.com/en
dc.subjectsocial worken
dc.subjectUnited Kingdomen
dc.subjectSwedenen
dc.titleNeoliberalism, managerialism and the reconfiguring of social work in Sweden and the United Kingdomen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1461-7323
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester ; Lulea University of Technology ; University of East London ; University of East London
dc.identifier.journalOrganization
html.description.abstractThis paper considers some of the ways in which neoliberalism, through the processes of managerialism, has impacted on the occupation of social work in Sweden and the UK. It is argued that there are similar implications in both countries, through the managerial drive for increased performance in economy, efficiency and effectiveness, but also in the development of evidence based practice. Whilst the key focus of the paper is on similarities between these two countries, differences are also noted. There is also recognition of the way in which resistance to the reconfiguration of social work is taking shape.


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