• Contextual behavioural coaching: An evidence-based model for supporting behaviour change

      Hulbert-Williams, Lee; Hochard, Kevin D.; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.; Archer, Rob; Nicholls, Wendy; Wilson, Kelly G.; University of Chester (British Psychological Society, 2016-09-10)
      As coaching psychology finds its feet, demands for evidence-based approaches are increasing both from inside and outside of the industry. There is an opportunity in the many evidence-based interventions in other areas of applied psychology that are of direct relevance to coaching psychology. However, there may too be risks associated with unprincipled eclecticism. Existing approaches that are gaining popularity in the coaching field such as Dialectic Behavioural Therapy and Mindfulness enjoy close affiliation with Contextual Behavioral Science (CBS). In this article, we provide a brief overview of CBS as a coherent philosophical, scientific, and practice framework for empirically supported coaching work. We review its evidence base, and its direct applicability to coaching by describing CBS’s most explicitly linked intervention – Acceptance and Commitment Therapy/Training (ACT). We highlight key strengths of ACT including: its great flexibility in regard of the kinds of client change it can support; the variety of materials and exercises available; and, the varied modes of delivery through which it has been shown to work. The article lays out guiding principles and provides a brief illustrative case study of Contextual Behavioural Coaching.
    • Initial validation of the mindful eating scale

      Hulbert-Williams, Lee; Nicholls, Wendy; Joy, Jayne; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.; University of Wolverhampton ; University of Wolverhampton ; University of Chester ; University of Chester (2013-06-10)
      Self-report scales for mindfulness are now widely used in applied settings, and have made a contribution to research, for instance in demonstrating mediation effects. To date there are no convincing data as to whether mindfulness skills generalise fully across life domains, and so some researchers have developed mindfulness scales for particular domains of behaviour. We present the development of a self-report scale to measure mindfulness with respect to eating behaviours.
    • Psychological interventions for patients with cancer: Psychological flexibility and the potential utility of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

      Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.; Storey, Lesley; Wilson, Kelly G.; University of Chester ; Queen’s University Belfast ; University of Mississippi; Department of Psychology; University of Chester; Chester UK; School of Psychology; Queen's University Belfast; Belfast UK; University of Mississippi; University MS USA (Wiley, 2014-08-06)
      Cancer is an illness affecting patients' physical and psychosocial well-being: high numbers report problematic levels of distress at many points through diagnosis, treatment and survivorship. Conclusive evidence for the long-term benefits of psychological interventions is lacking and this may be because (1) they employ a too limited scope of underlying therapeutic model; or (2) that they are too focused on improving psychopathological outcomes. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) may add components not emphasised elsewhere and may provide a more suitable model of adjustment and coping. Following a comprehensive literature search a theoretical and conceptual discussion of the potential for ACT-based oncology interventions is presented.