• The effects of sex and handedness on masturbation laterality and other lateralised motor behaviours

      Rodway, Paul; Thoma, Volker; Schepman, Astrid; University of Chester; University of East London (Taylor and Francis, 2021-11-26)
      Masturbation is a common human behaviour. Compared to other unimanual behaviours it has unique properties, including increased sexual and emotional arousal, and privacy. Self-reported hand preference for masturbation was examined in 104 left-handed and 103 right-handed women, and 100 left-handed and 99 right-handed men. Handedness (modified Edinburgh Handedness Inventory, EHI), footedness, eyedness, and cheek kissing preferences were also measured. Seventy nine percent used their dominant hand (always/usually) for masturbation, but left-handers (71.5%) were less consistently lateralised to use their dominant hand than right-handers (86.5%). Hand preference for masturbation correlated more strongly with handedness (EHI), than with footedness, eyedness, or cheek preference. There was no difference in masturbation frequency between left and right-handers, but men masturbated more frequently than women, and more women (75%) than men (33%) masturbated with sex aids. For kissing the preferred cheek of an emotionally close person from the viewer’s perspective, left-handers showed a left-cheek preference, and right-handers a weaker right-cheek preference. The results suggest that hemispheric asymmetries in emotion do not influence hand preference for masturbation but may promote a leftward shift in cheek kissing. In all, masturbation is lateralised in a similar way to other manual motor behaviours in left-handed and right-handed men and women.
    • ‘Haematological cancers, they’re a funny bunch’: A qualitative study of Non-Hodgkin lymphoma patient experiences of unmet supportive care needs.

      Swash, Brooke; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.; Bramwell, Ros; University of Chester; University of Cambridge (SAGE, 2016-07-28)
      Despite high levels of psychological distress, there is a scarcity of research on unmet supportive care needs in haematological cancer patients. This qualitative study used an in-depth interpretative phenomenological approach to investigate the needs reported by six Non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients and explored how these needs consequently shaped the patient experience. Emergent themes included: concerns for family, information needs and the need for psychological support. Participants reported feeling different to other cancer patients. Lack of understanding of their diagnosis by friends and family, and access to relevant support services, are notable unmet needs that differ from previous findings.