• Helping school students deal with peer provocations and avoid hostile attribution bias with a co-operative cross-age teaching intervention: A pilot study

      Boulton, Michael J.; Boulton, Louise; University of Chester (Wiley, 2017)
      Cross-age tutoring and co-operative group work have been shown to help student tutors and tutees acquire academic and non-academic skills and knowledge. A novel intervention (Cross-Age Teaching Zone, CATZ) that combined them was tested for its effects on student tutors’ thinking skills associated with (i) dealing pro-socially with peer provocations and (ii) avoiding hostile attribution bias. Small co-operative groups of 11 and 15 year old students (n= 228) designed a CATZ lesson on these themes and delivered it to younger students. The CATZ tutors, but not matched controls (n = 189), showed significant improvements on both outcome measures. Participants aged 9 to 15 years (n = 469) were also asked about: (1) their willingness to act as CATZ tutors/tutees, (2) how effective they think such CATZ activities would be, (3) how much they valued autonomy in how they might deliver CATZ, and (4) their relative preference for being taught by older students versus teachers. Overall, participants expressed positive views of CATZ. This evidence for the effectiveness and social validity of CATZ support its more widespread use in schools to help students learn patterns of thinking that can help them avoid aggressive and conflict behavior.