• The relevance of technology to the nature, prevalence and impact of adolescent dating violence and abuse: A research synthesis.

      Stonard, Karlie E.; Bowen, Erica; Lawrence, Tony R.; Price, Shelley A.; Coventry University, Coventry University, Coventry University, University of Chester (Elsevier, 2014-06-21)
      While an established literature has documented the nature and prevalence of traditional forms of Adolescent Dating Violence and Abuse (ADVA), less research has investigated the relevance of Electronic Communication Technology (ECT) such as mobile phones and communication tools via the Internet to ADVA and to psychological/emotional abuse and monitoring or controlling behaviors in particular. This paper reviews the literature on the nature, prevalence and impact of ADVA andwhatwill be termed Technology Assisted Adolescent Dating Violence and Abuse (TAADVA). The review revealed a broad range of prevalence estimates for physical, psychological/emotional, and sexual dating violence in addition to abuse experienced or performed via ECT. Inconsistencies in prevalence reports are likely to be due to the various measures and methods used to investigate this phenomenon, however; this leads to difficulties when attempting to make accurate comparisons and generalizations. Limited research was found to have explored the impact of TAADVA compared to that of traditional ADVA. Nevertheless, ADVA and TAADVA were prevalent in a substantial number of adolescent romantic relationships in these studies. It is suggested that ECT provides a new avenue for ADVA rather than representing a new, unique form of abuse. Further research is needed to explore the nature, prevalence, and impact of ECT use for both abusive and non-abusive purposes within adolescent dating relationships, in addition to whether this creates new victims or perpetrators of such abuse. Implications of the findings of the review are discussed.
    • Victim, perpetrator, and offense characteristics in filicide and filicide-suicide

      Debowska, Agata; Boduszek, Daniel; Dhingra, Katie; University of Chester ; University of Huddersfield ; Manchester Metropolitan University (Elsevier, 2015-01-07)
      The purpose of this paper is to provide a critical review of most recent studies of parental and stepparental filicide. A detailed review of the literature revealed the importance of certain demographic, environmental, and psychosocial factors in the commission of child homicide. Our findings indicate that filicides perpetrated by genetic parents and stepparents differ considerably in terms of underlying motivational factors. Data in the literature suggest that biological parents are more likely to choose methods of killing which produce quick and painless death, whereas stepparents frequently kill their wards by beating. Research results demonstrate the victims of maternal filicides to be significantly younger than the victims of paternal filicides. Additionally, filicide-suicide is most often associated with parental psychopathology. Genetic fathers are at the greatest risk of death by suicide after the commission of familicide. These findings are discussed in relation to theoretical frameworks explaining the occurrence of child murder. Further, limitations of reviewed studies and directions for future research are presented.