• Moving to remote working: a guide for traditional lab-based experiments

      Vaughan, Sarah; Holt, Glenys; Scudds, Annie; Wilkinson, Heather; Lasikiewicz, Nicola; University of Chester
      The aim of our study was to test whether we could move a traditional laboratory-based experiment online without reducing the reliability and validity of the results. To this end, we recorded participants facial expressions using an emotional rating task in which participants rated the unpleasantness of emotional stimuli, as well as the strength of their emotional reaction. We adopted a 2 (group: online versus face-to-face) *2 (conditions: attend and reappraisal) design. Here, we presented a recount of our reflections and decisions made during the process of designing this study to provide readers with 1. the opportunity to reflect on the participant experience in navigating the traditionally laboratory-based paradigm online and without assistance, 2. a discussion of the experience of conducting traditionally laboratory-based experimental research in an online environment and 3. a consideration of the future of experimental psychological methods in the context of increased need for online-based research. We would recommend considering the wider contextual, the unknown or known extraneous variables when developing a design.
    • Sweet Emotion: The Role of Odor-Induced Context in the Search Advantage for Happy Facial Expressions

      Damjanovic, Ljubica; Wilkinson, Heather; Lloyd, Julie; Liverpool John Moores University; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2017-12-23)
      The current study investigated the extent to which the concurrent presentation of pleasant and unpleasant odors could modulate the perceptual saliency of happy facial expressions in an emotional visual search task. Whilst a search advantage for happy faces was found in the no odor and unpleasant odor conditions, it was abolished under the pleasant odor condition. Furthermore, phasic properties of visual search performance revealed the malleable nature of this happiness advantage. Specifically, attention towards happy faces was optimized at the start of the visual search task for participants presented with pleasant odors, but diminished towards the end. This pattern was reversed for participants in the unpleasant odor condition. These patterns occur through the emotion-inducing capacities of odors and highlight the circumstances in which top-down factors can override perceptually salient facial features in emotional visual search.
    • The value of self-respect for moral and social behaviour: Development of a trait self-respect measure

      Clucas, Claudine; Wilkinson, Heather; University of Chester (2017-05-05)
      Objective: Research into self-respect is scarce, possibly because self-respect and self-esteem are often treated as interchangeable in popular culture. However, there is evidence that self-respect is a component of global self-esteem that is attached to moral, principled and honourable behaviour, highlighting its unique role in predicting moral behaviour and well-being. The paper reports on the development of the trait self-respect scale (SRS) to stimulate research into this concept. Design: Following pilot work to develop the items, cross-sectional survey and lab-based data were collected to validate the SRS. Methods: Seven convenience adult samples (total N=841) completed the SRS online or in person alongside other validated scales. One sample (N=115) also underwent lab-based tasks measuring moral self-concept and cheating. Results: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a one-factor structure. The SRS showed good internal consistency (α>.8 in all samples), convergent and discriminant validity. It correlated significantly with self-esteem (r=.40-.61), and with agreeableness, Machiavellianism, positive norm, moral identity internalisation and symbolisation (N=121), moral-based self-esteem, self-control, number of moral trait adjectives recalled in self-related processing (N=115) and religious status (N=230), adjusting for self-esteem. It did not correlate with amount of social comparison, or with competence and social self-esteem, adjusting for self-regard. Moreover, self-respect significantly predicted forms of pro-relationship behaviour, pro-social behaviour (N=114), cheating (self-reported and observed) and well-being (N=81) over and above self-esteem. Conclusion: Findings support the need to consider trait self-respect in investigations of well-being and moral and social functioning, and contribute to debates on the value of self-esteem.