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dc.contributor.authorGrady, Tim*
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-16T16:34:03Zen
dc.date.available2014-05-16T16:34:03Zen
dc.date.issued2015-03-20en
dc.identifier.citationGrady, T. (2015). A Shared Environment: German–German Relations along the Border, 1945–72. Journal of Contemporary History, 50(3), 660-679.en
dc.identifier.issn0022-0094en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0022009414564803en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/317065en
dc.descriptionThis is the author's PDF post-print of an article accepted for publication in the Journal of Contemporary History . The definitive version is available at http://jch.sagepub.com/en
dc.description.abstractThe division of Germany into two militarised blocs during the Cold War fundamentally shaped the lives of people living in both East and West. Yet, as recent scholarship has increasingly highlighted, there were also numerous areas of contact and interaction, whether in the cultural, political or social sphere. One largely overlooked aspect of these Cold War relations, which this article explores, is the environment. Focusing on the history of the shared German environment from the end of the Second World War through until the early 1970s, the article argues that on a local level, environmental problems helped to ensure the survival of cross-border relations. Despite their repeated efforts, the two states failed to divide the German landscape in half. Rivers, lakes and forests continually crossed the fortified border, while animals and plant life traversed from one side to the other too. In attempting to maintain this shared border landscape, both East and West Germans were repeatedly forced into dialogue. Although relations gradually faded as the border regime was strengthened, it proved impossible for either side to escape fully the entangled German environment.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://jch.sagepub.com/en
dc.subjectBerlin Wallen
dc.subjectCold Waren
dc.subjectEast Germanyen
dc.subjectenvironmentalismen
dc.subjectGerman Federal Republicen
dc.titleA shared environment: German-German relations along the border, 1945-1972en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1461-7250en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Contemporary Historyen
dc.description.release20-03-2015en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1177/0022009414564803
html.description.abstractThe division of Germany into two militarised blocs during the Cold War fundamentally shaped the lives of people living in both East and West. Yet, as recent scholarship has increasingly highlighted, there were also numerous areas of contact and interaction, whether in the cultural, political or social sphere. One largely overlooked aspect of these Cold War relations, which this article explores, is the environment. Focusing on the history of the shared German environment from the end of the Second World War through until the early 1970s, the article argues that on a local level, environmental problems helped to ensure the survival of cross-border relations. Despite their repeated efforts, the two states failed to divide the German landscape in half. Rivers, lakes and forests continually crossed the fortified border, while animals and plant life traversed from one side to the other too. In attempting to maintain this shared border landscape, both East and West Germans were repeatedly forced into dialogue. Although relations gradually faded as the border regime was strengthened, it proved impossible for either side to escape fully the entangled German environment.
rioxxterms.publicationdate2015-03-20
dc.date.deposited2014-05-12


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