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dc.contributor.authorSteen, Mary*
dc.contributor.authorJones, Alun*
dc.contributor.authorWoodworth, Barabara*
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-12T11:16:48Z
dc.date.available2014-03-12T11:16:48Z
dc.date.issued2013-12-01
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Midwifery, 2013, 21(12), pp. 844 - 850
dc.identifier.issn0969-4900
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/313949
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.
dc.description.abstractAlthough becoming and being a parent are considered happy life events, parents can suffer from varying degrees of anxiety and variable mood. Anxiety and mood changes can be missed and this can lead to mental health problems if not recognised at an early stage. An insecure attachment in a parent's early infanthood can contribute to increased levels of anxiety and emotional problems when becoming and being a parent themselves, which can influence mother and child bonding as well as wider difficulties within family relationships. In many instances, attachment styles can be passed on to the infant causing a range of emotional and intellectual difficulties. In certain circumstances, these parents may benefit from psychotherapy. Psychotherapy is a method of addressing troubling emotions along with life difficulties and relationship struggles. Using psychological methods, a psychotherapist can help a person change his or her life for the better by becoming more effective in work or personal relationships. Local community support and befriending approaches have been shown to be beneficial in alleviating anxiety and depression. This article briefly describes what psychotherapy is and demonstrates ways in which interpersonal attachment styles established early on in life can bring difficulties to adult relationships. Two disguised scenarios referring to actual psychotherapy consultations are included to illustrate how plans can be put in place to address interpersonal difficulties related to attachment styles.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMark Allen Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.britishjournalofmidwifery.comen
dc.subjectanxietyen
dc.subjectbondingen
dc.subjectattachmenten
dc.subjectpregnancyen
dc.subjectparenthooden
dc.subjectpsychotherapyen
dc.subjectmental healthen
dc.subjectemotional and behavioural difficultiesen
dc.titleAnxiety, bonding and attachment during pregnancy, the transition to parenthood and psychotherapyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester ; University of Chester ; Chester and Wirral Partnership NHS Trust
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Midwifery
html.description.abstractAlthough becoming and being a parent are considered happy life events, parents can suffer from varying degrees of anxiety and variable mood. Anxiety and mood changes can be missed and this can lead to mental health problems if not recognised at an early stage. An insecure attachment in a parent's early infanthood can contribute to increased levels of anxiety and emotional problems when becoming and being a parent themselves, which can influence mother and child bonding as well as wider difficulties within family relationships. In many instances, attachment styles can be passed on to the infant causing a range of emotional and intellectual difficulties. In certain circumstances, these parents may benefit from psychotherapy. Psychotherapy is a method of addressing troubling emotions along with life difficulties and relationship struggles. Using psychological methods, a psychotherapist can help a person change his or her life for the better by becoming more effective in work or personal relationships. Local community support and befriending approaches have been shown to be beneficial in alleviating anxiety and depression. This article briefly describes what psychotherapy is and demonstrates ways in which interpersonal attachment styles established early on in life can bring difficulties to adult relationships. Two disguised scenarios referring to actual psychotherapy consultations are included to illustrate how plans can be put in place to address interpersonal difficulties related to attachment styles.


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