• Lipid metabolism and hormonal interactions: Impact on cardiovascular disease and healthy aging

      Mc Auley, Mark T.; Mooney, Kathleen M.; University of Chester ; Edge Hill University (informa health care, 2014-07)
      Populations in developed nations are aging gradually; it is predicted that by 2050 almost a quarter of the world’s population will be over 60 years old, more than twice the figure at the turn of the 20th century. Although we are living longer, this does not mean the extra years will be spent in good health. Cardiovascular diseases are the primary cause of ill health and their prevalence increases with age. Traditionally, lipid biomarkers have been utilized to stratify disease risk and predict the onset of cardiovascular events. However, recent evidence suggests that hormonal interplay with lipid metabolism could have a significant role to play in modulating cardiovascular disease risk. This review will explore recent findings which have investigated the role hormones have on the dynamics of lipid metabolism. The aim is to offer an insight into potential avenues for therapeutic intervention.
    • Obesity and the Dysregulation of Fatty Acid Metabolism: Implications for Healthy Aging

      Morgan, Amy; Mooney, Kathleen M.; Mc Auley, Mark T.; University of Chester; Edge Hill University (Taylor & Francis, 2016-10-17)
      The population of the world is aging. In 2010, an estimated 524 million people were aged 65 years or older presenting eight percent of the global population. By 2050, this number is expected to nearly triple to approximately 1.5 billion, 16 percent of the world’s population. Although people are living longer, the quality of their lives are often compromised due to ill-health. Areas covered. Of the conditions which compromise health as we age, obesity is at the forefront. Over half of the global older population were overweight or obese in 2010, significantly increasing the risk of a range of metabolic diseases. Although, it is well recognised excessive calorie intake is a fundamental driver of adipose tissue dysfunction, the relationship between obesity; intrinsic aging; and fat metabolism is less understood. In this review we discuss the intersection between obesity, aging and the factors which contribute to the dysregulation of whole-body fat metabolism. Expert Commentary. Being obese disrupts an array of physiological systems and there is significant crosstalk among these. Moreover it is imperative to acknowledge the contribution intrinsic aging makes to the dysregulation of these systems and the onset of disease.