• Benchmarking of a micro gas turbine model integrated with post-combustion CO2 capture

      Usman, Ali; Font Palma, Carolina; Nikpey Somehsaraei, Homam; Mansouri Majoumerd, Mohammad; Akram, Muhammad; Finney, Karen N.; Best, Thom; Mohd Said, Nassya B.; Assadi, Mohsen; Pourkashanian, Mohamed; et al. (Elsevier, 2017-03-19)
      The deployment of post-combustion CO2 capture on large-scale gas-fired power plants is currently progressing, hence the integration of the power and capture plants requires a good understanding of operational requirements and limitations to support this effort. This article aims to assist research in this area, by studying a micro gas turbine (MGT) integrated with an amine-based post-combustion CO2 capture unit. Both processes were simulated using two different software tools –IPSEpro and Aspen Hysys, and validated against experimental tests. The two MGT models were benchmarked at the nominal condition, and then extended to part-loads (50 and 80 kWe), prior to their integration with the capture plant at flue gas CO2 concentrations between 5 and 10 mol%. Further, the performance of the MGT and capture plant when gas turbine exhaust gases were recirculated was assessed. Exhaust gas recirculation increases the CO2 concentration, and reduces the exhaust gas flowrate and specific reboiler duty. The benchmarking of the two models revealed that the IPSEpro model can be easily adapted to new MGT cycle modifications since turbine temperatures and rotational speeds respond to reaching temperature limits; whilst a detailed rate-based approach for the capture plant in Hysys resulted in closely aligned simulation results with experimental data.
    • Comparative Potential of Natural Gas, Coal and Biomass Fired Power Plant with Post - combustion CO2 Capture and Compression

      Ali, Usman; Font Palma, Carolina; Akram, Muhammad; Agbonghae, Elvis O.; Ingham, Derek B.; Pourkashanian, Mohamed; University of Sheffield, University of Chester, Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (Elsevier, 2017-06-07)
      The application of carbon capture and storage (CCS) and carbon neutral techniques should be adopted to reduce the CO2 emissions from power generation systems. These environmental concerns have renewed interest towards the use of biomass as an alternative to fossil fuels. This study investigates the comparative potential of different power generation systems, including NGCC with and without exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), pulverised supercritical coal and biomass fired power plants for constant heat input and constant fuel flowrate cases. The modelling of all the power plant cases is realized in Aspen Plus at the gross power output of 800 MWe and integrated with a MEA-based CO2 capture plant and a CO2 compression unit. Full-scale detailed modelling of integrated power plant with a CO2 capture and compression system for biomass fuel for two different cases is reported and compared with the conventional ones. The process performance, in terms of efficiency, emissions and potential losses for all the cases, is analysed. In conclusion, NGCC and NGCC with EGR integrated with CO2 capture and compression results in higher net efficiency and least efficiency penalty reduction. Further, coal and biomass fired power plants integrated with CO2 capture and compression results in higher specific CO2 capture and the least specific losses per unit of the CO2 captured. Furthermore, biomass with CO2 capture and compression results in negative emissions.
    • Evaluation of a Micro Gas Turbine With Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for Exhaust Gas Recirculation Potential With Two Experimentally Validated Models

      Nikpey Somehsaraei, Homam; Ali, Usman; Font-Palma, Carolina; Mansouri Majoumerd, Mohammad; Akram, Muhammad; Pourkashanian, Mohamed; Assadi, Mohsen (American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2017-08-17)
      The growing global energy demand is facing concerns raised by increasing greenhouse gas emissions, predominantly CO2. Despite substantial progress in the field of renewable energy in recent years, quick balancing responses and back-up services are still necessary to maintain the grid load and stability, due to increased penetration of intermittent renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind. In a scenario of natural gas availability, gas turbine power may be a substitute for back-up/balancing load. Rapid start-up and shut down, high ramp rate, and low emissions and maintenance have been achieved in commercial gas turbine cycles. This industry still needs innovative cycle configurations, e.g. exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), to achieve higher system performance and lower emissions in the current competitive power generation market. Together with reduced NOx emissions, EGR cycle provides an exhaust gas with higher CO2 concentration compared to the simple gas turbine/combined cycle, favorable for post-combustion carbon capture. This paper presents an evaluation of EGR potential for improved gas turbine cycle performance and integration with a post-combustion CO2 capture process. It also highlights features of two software tools with different capabilities for performance analysis of gas turbine cycles, integrated with post-combustion capture. The study is based on a combined heat and power micro gas turbine (MGT), Turbec T100, of 100kWe output. Detailed models for the baseline MGT and amine capture plant were developed in two software tools, IPSEpro and Aspen Hysys. These models were validated against experimental work conducted at the UK PACT National Core Facilities. Characteristics maps for the compressor and the turbine were used for the MGT modeling. The performance indicators of systems with and without EGR, and when varying the EGR ratio and ambient temperature, were calculated and are presented in this paper.
    • Evaluation of the performance and economic viability of a novel low temperature carbon capture process

      Wilson, Paul; Lychnos, George; Clements, Alastair; Michailos, Stavros; Font Palma, Carolina; Diego, Maria E.; Pourkashanian, Mohamed; Howe, Joseph; PMW Technology Ltd; University of Sheffield; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2019-04-22)
      A novel Advanced Cryogenic Carbon Capture (A3C) process is being developed using low cost but high intensity heat transfer to achieve high CO2 capture efficiencies with a much reduced energy consumption and process equipment size. These characteristics, along with the purity of CO2 product and absence of process chemicals, offer the potential for application across a range of sectors. This work presents a techno-economic evaluation for applications ranging from 3% to 35%vol. CO2 content. The A3C process is evaluated against an amine-based CO2 capture process for three applications; an oil-fired boiler, a combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) and a biogas upgrading plant. The A3C process has shown a modest life cost advantage over the mature MEA technology for the larger selected applications, and substantially lower costs in the smaller biogas application. Enhanced energy recovery and optimization offer significant opportunities for further reductions in cost.
    • Evaluation of the Performance and Economic Viability of a Novel Low Temperature Carbon Capture Process

      Lychnos, George; Clements, Alastair; Willson, Paul; Font Palma, Carolina; Diego, Maria E.; Pourkashanian, Mohamed; Howe, Joseph; PMW Technology Limited; University of Sheffield; University of Chester (SSRN, 2018/10)
      A novel Advanced Cryogenic Carbon Capture (A3C) process is being developed due to its potential to achieve high CO2 capture efficiencies using low cost but high intensity heat transfer to deliver a much reduced energy consumption and process equipment size. These characteristics, along with the absence of process chemicals, offer the potential for application across a range of sectors. This work presents a techno-economic evaluation for applications ranging from 3% to 30% CO2 content.
    • Experimental and process modelling study of integration of a micro-turbine with an amine plant

      Agbonghae, Elvis O.; Best, Thom; Finney, Karen N.; Font Palma, Carolina; Hughes, Kevin J.; Pourkashanian, Mohamed; University of Leeds (Elsevier, 2014/12)
      An integrated model of a micro-turbine coupled to a CO2 capture plant has been developed with Aspen Plus, and validated with experimental data obtained from a Turbec T100 microturbine at the PACT facilities in the UKCCS Research Centre, Beighton, UK. Monoethanolamine (MEA) was used as solvent and experimental measurements from the CO2 capture plant have been used to validate the steady-state model developed with Aspen Plus®. The optimum liquid/gas ratio and the lean CO2 loading for 90% CO2 capture has been quantified for flue gases with CO2 concentrations ranging from 3 to 8 mol%.
    • Impact of the operating conditions and position of exhaust gas recirculation on the performance of a micro gas turbine

      Ali, Usman; Font Palma, Carolina; Hughes, Kevin J.; Ingham, Derek B.; Ma, Lin; Pourkashanian, Mohamed; University of Chester/University of Leeds (Elsevier, 2015-06-10)
      Gas turbines are a viable and secure option both economically and environmentally for power and heat generation. The process simulation of the micro gas turbine with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and its impact on performance is evaluated. This study is further extended to evaluate the effect of the operating conditions and position of the EGR on the performance of the micro gas turbine. The performance analysis for different configurations of the EGR cycle, as well as flue gas condensation temperature, results in the optimized position of EGR at the compressor inlet with partial condensation resulting in the CO2 enhancement to 3.7 mol%.
    • Integrated Oxyfuel Power Plant with Improved CO2 Separation and Compression Technology for EOR application

      Font Palma, Carolina; Errey, Olivia; Corden, Caroline; Chalmers, Hannah; Lucquiaud, Mathieu; Sanchez del Rio, Maria; Jackson, Steve; Medcalf, Daniel; Livesey, Bryony; Gibbins, Jon; et al. (2016-06-25)
      An integrated advanced supercritical coal-fired oxyfuel power plant with a novel cryogenic CO2 separation and compression technology for high purity CO2 to suit injection for enhanced oil recovery purposes is investigated. The full process is modelled in Aspen Plus® consisting of: an Air Separation Unit (ASU), an Advanced Supercritical Pulverised Fuel (ASC PF) power plant with a bituminous coal as feedstock, a steam cycle, and a Carbon dioxide Purification Unit (CPU). The proposed CPU process accommodates a distillation column with an integrated reboiler duty to achieve a very high purity CO2 product (99.9%) with constrained oxygen levels (100 ppm). This work presents a detailed analysis of the CO2 separation and compression process within the full power plant, including effective heat integration to reduce the electricity output penalty associated with oxyfuel CO2 capture. The results of this analysis are compared with previous studies and indicate that the combined application of process optimisation in the CPU and advanced heat integration with the power plant offer promising results: In this work a high purity CO2 product was achieved while maintaining 90% capture for a net plant efficiency of 38.02% (LHV), compared with a thermal efficiency of 37.76% (LHV) for a reference simulation of an ASC PF oxy-fired plant with advanced heat integration, providing a lower purity CO2 product.
    • Part-load performance of direct-firing and co-firing of coal and biomass in a power generation system integrated with a CO2 capture and compression system

      Ali, Usman; Akram, Muhammad; Font Palma, Carolina; Ingham, Derek B.; Pourkashanian, Mohamed; University of Sheffield; University of Chester; University of Engineering and Technology (Elsevier, 2017-09-18)
      Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) is recognised as a key technology to mitigate CO2 emissions and achieve stringent climate targets due to its potential for negative emissions. However, the cost for its deployment is expected to be higher than for fossil-based power plants with CCS. To help in the transition to fully replace fossil fuels, co-firing of coal and biomass provide a less expensive means. Therefore, this work examines the co-firing at various levels in a pulverised supercritical power plant with post-combustion CO2 capture, using a fully integrated model developed in Aspen Plus. Co-firing offers flexibility in terms of the biomass resources needed. This work also investigates flexibility within operation. As a result, the performance of the power plant at various part-loads (40%, 60% and 80%) is studied and compared to the baseline at 100%, using a constant fuel flowrate. It was found that the net power output and net efficiency decrease when the biomass fraction increases for constant heat input and constant fuel flow rate cases. At constant heat input, more fuel is required as the biomass fraction is increased; whilst at constant fuel input, derating occurs, e.g. 30% derating of the power output capacity at firing 100% biomass compared to 100% coal. Co-firing of coal and biomass resulted in substantial power derating at each part-load operation.
    • Process simulation and thermodynamic analysis of a micro turbine with post-combustion CO2 capture and exhaust gas recirculation

      Ali, Usman; Best, Thom; Finney, Karen N.; Font Palma, Carolina; Hughes, Kevin J.; Ingham, Derek B.; Pourkashanian, Mohamed; University of Leeds (Elsevier, 2014-12-31)
      With the effects of the emissions from power plants causing global climate change, the trend towards lower emission systems such as natural gas power plant is increasing. In this paper a Turbec T100 micro gas turbine is studied. The system is assessed thermodynamically using a steady-state model; model results of its alteration with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) are presented in this paper. The process simulation with EGR offers a useful assessment when integrated with post-combustion CO2 capture. The EGR model results in the enrichment of the CO2 which decrease the energy demand of the CO2 capture system.
    • Thermodynamic Analysis and Process System Comparison of the Exhaust Gas Recirculated, Steam Injected and Humidified Micro Gas Turbine

      Ali, Usman; Font Palma, Carolina; Hughes, Kevin J.; Ingham, Derek B.; Ma, Lin; Pourkashanian, Mohamed; University of Leeds (ASME Proceedings, 2015-06-15)
      Stringent environmental emission regulations and continuing efforts to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) from the energy sector, in the context of global warming, have promoted interest to improve the efficiency of power generation systems whilst reducing emissions. Further, this has led to the development of innovative gas turbine systems which either result in higher electrical efficiency or the reduction of CO2 emissions. Micro gas turbines are one of the secure, economical and environmentally viable options for power and heat generation. Here, a Turbec T100 micro gas turbine (MGT) is simulated using Aspen HYSYS® V8.4 and validated through experimental data. Due to the consistency and robustness of the steady state model developed, it is further extended to three different innovative cycles: (i) an exhaust gas recirculated (EGR) cycle, in which part of the exhaust gas is dried and re-circulated to the MGT inlet; (ii) a steam injected (STIG) cycle, and (iii) a humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The steam and hot water are generated through the exhaust of the recuperator for the STIG and HAT cycle, respectively. Further, the steam is directly injected into the recuperator for power augmentation, while for the HAT cycle; the compressed air is saturated with water in the humid tower before entering the recuperator. This study evaluates the impact of the EGR ratio, steam to air ratio, and water to air ratio on the performance and efficiency of the system. The comparative potential for each innovative cycle is assessed by thermodynamic properties estimation of process parameters through the models developed to better understand the behavior of each cycle. The thermodynamic assessment indicates that CO2 enrichment occurs for the three innovative cycles. Further, the results indicate that the electrical efficiency increases for the STIG and HAT cycle while it decreases for the EGR cycle. In conclusion, the innovative cycles indicates the possibilities to improve the system performance and efficiency.