• Cholesterol metabolism: A review of how ageing disrupts the biological mechanisms responsible for its regulation

      Morgan, Amy; Mooney, Kathleen M.; Wilkinson, Stephen J.; Pickles, Neil; Mc Auley, Mark T.; University of Chester, Edgehill University (Elsevier, 2016-04-01)
      Cholesterol plays a vital role in the human body as a precursor of steroid hormones and bile acids, in addition to providing structure to cell membranes. Whole body cholesterol metabolism is maintained by a highly coordinated balancing act between cholesterol ingestion, synthesis, absorption, and excretion. The aim of this review is to discuss how ageing interacts with these processes. Firstly, we will present an overview of cholesterol metabolism. Following this, we discuss how the biological mechanisms which underpin cholesterol metabolism are effected by ageing. Included in this discussion are lipoprotein dynamics, cholesterol absorption/synthesis and the enterohepatic circulation/synthesis of bile acids. Moreover, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in the pathological progression of atherosclerosis and also discuss how cholesterol biosynthesis is effected by both the mammalian target of rapamycin and sirtuin pathways. Next, we examine how diet and alterations to the gut microbiome can be used to mitigate the impact ageing has on cholesterol metabolism. We conclude by discussing how mathematical models of cholesterol metabolism can be used to identify therapeutic interventions.
    • Investigating Cholesterol Metabolism and Ageing Using a Systems Biology Approach

      Morgan, Amy; Mooney, Kathleen M.; Wilkinson, Stephen J.; Pickles, Neil; Mc Auley, Mark T.; University of Chester (Cambridge University Press, 2016-11-02)
      CVD accounted for 27 % of all deaths in the UK in 2014, and was responsible for 1·7 million hospital admissions in 2013/2014. This condition becomes increasingly prevalent with age, affecting 34·1 and 29·8 % of males and females over 75 years of age respectively in 2011. The dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism with age, often observed as a rise in LDL-cholesterol, has been associated with the pathogenesis of CVD. To compound this problem, it is estimated by 2050, 22 % of the world's population will be over 60 years of age, in culmination with a growing resistance and intolerance to pre-existing cholesterol regulating drugs such as statins. Therefore, it is apparent research into additional therapies for hypercholesterolaemia and CVD prevention is a growing necessity. However, it is also imperative to recognise this complex biological system cannot be studied using a reductionist approach; rather its biological uniqueness necessitates a more integrated methodology, such as that offered by systems biology. In this review, we firstly discuss cholesterol metabolism and how it is affected by diet and the ageing process. Next, we describe therapeutic strategies for hypercholesterolaemia, and finally how the systems biology paradigm can be utilised to investigate how ageing interacts with complex systems such as cholesterol metabolism. We conclude by emphasising the need for nutritionists to work in parallel with the systems biology community, to develop novel approaches to studying cholesterol metabolism and its interaction with ageing.
    • Mathematically modelling the dynamics of cholesterol metabolism and ageing

      Morgan, Amy; Mooney, Kathleen M.; Wilkinson, Stephen J.; Pickles, Neil; Mc Auley, Mark T.; University of Chester, Edgehill University (Elsevier, 2016-07-30)
      Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. This conditionbecomes increasingly prevalent during ageing; 34.1% and 29.8% of males and females respectively, over 75years of age have an underlying cardiovascular problem. The dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism isinextricably correlated with cardiovascular health and for this reason low density lipoprotein cholesterol(LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are routinely used as biomarkers of CVD risk. Theaim of this work was to use mathematical modelling to explore how cholesterol metabolism is affectedby the ageing process. To do this we updated a previously published whole-body mathematical model ofcholesterol metabolism to include an additional 96 mechanisms that are fundamental to this biologicalsystem. Additional mechanisms were added to cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis, reversecholesterol transport (RCT), bile acid synthesis, and their enterohepatic circulation. The sensitivity of themodel was explored by the use of both local and global parameter scans. In addition, acute cholesterolfeeding was used to explore the effectiveness of the regulatory mechanisms which are responsible formaintaining whole-body cholesterol balance. It was found that our model behaves as a hypo-responderto cholesterol feeding, while both the hepatic and intestinal pools of cholesterol increased significantly.The model was also used to explore the effects of ageing in tandem with three different cholesterolester transfer protein (CETP) genotypes. Ageing in the presence of an atheroprotective CETP genotype,conferring low CETP activity, resulted in a 0.6% increase in LDL-C. In comparison, ageing with a genotypereflective of high CETP activity, resulted in a 1.6% increase in LDL-C. Thus, the model has illustrated theimportance of CETP genotypes such as I405V, and their potential role in healthy ageing.