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dc.contributor.authorGarratt, Dean*
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-03T14:13:01Z
dc.date.available2014-01-03T14:13:01Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationSports Coaching Review, 2013, 2(1), pp. 1-12en
dc.identifier.issn2164-0629
dc.identifier.issn2164-0637
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/21640629.2013.822152
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/310866
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.en
dc.description.abstractThis article presents a critical account of the relation and unlikely trinity of philosophy, qualitative methodology and sports coaching research, in order to challenge assumptions about the nature of qualitative data analysis. A more radical departure and critique from a philosophical-hermeneutic perspective is encouraged. The key argument presented is that qualitative data analysis should have less to do with ‘method’ and more with philosophy, where ‘practical reasoning’ forges a dialectical relation between the intellectual and practical in the analytical process. This argument is illustrated with reference to published empirical work in the field of sports coaching research.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/21640629.2013.822152
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Sports Coaching Reviewen
dc.subjectphilosophy
dc.subjectmethodology
dc.subjecthermeneutics
dc.subjectsports coaching
dc.titlePhilosophy, qualitative methodology and sports coaching research: An unlikely trinity?
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalSports Coaching Reviewen
html.description.abstractThis article presents a critical account of the relation and unlikely trinity of philosophy, qualitative methodology and sports coaching research, in order to challenge assumptions about the nature of qualitative data analysis. A more radical departure and critique from a philosophical-hermeneutic perspective is encouraged. The key argument presented is that qualitative data analysis should have less to do with ‘method’ and more with philosophy, where ‘practical reasoning’ forges a dialectical relation between the intellectual and practical in the analytical process. This argument is illustrated with reference to published empirical work in the field of sports coaching research.


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