• High‐order ADI orthogonal spline collocation method for a new 2D fractional integro‐differential problem

      Yan, Yubin; Qiao, Leijie; Xu, Da; University of Chester, UK; Guangdong University of Technology, PR. China; Hunan Normal University, P. R. China (John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2020-02-05)
      We use the generalized L1 approximation for the Caputo fractional deriva-tive, the second-order fractional quadrature rule approximation for the inte-gral term, and a classical Crank-Nicolson alternating direction implicit (ADI)scheme for the time discretization of a new two-dimensional (2D) fractionalintegro-differential equation, in combination with a space discretization by anarbitrary-order orthogonal spline collocation (OSC) method. The stability of aCrank-Nicolson ADI OSC scheme is rigourously established, and error estimateis also derived. Finally, some numerical tests are given
    • How do numerical methods perform for delay differential equations undergoing a Hopf bifurcation?

      Ford, Neville J.; Wulf, Volker (Manchester Centre for Computational Mathematics, 1999-09-30)
      This paper discusses the numerical solution of delay differential equations undergoing a Hopf birufication. Three distinct and complementary approaches to the analysis are presented.
    • How effective is Ant Colony Optimisation at Robot Path Planning

      Wolfenden, A.; Vaughan, Neil; University of Chester (The Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and Simulation for Behaviour (AISB), 2018-04-06)
      This project involves investigation of the problem robot path planning using ant colony optimisation heuristics to construct the quickest path from the starting point to the end. The project has developed a simulation that successfully simulates as well as demonstrates visually through a graphical user interface, robot path planning using ant colony optimisation. The simulation shows an ability to traverse an unknown environment from a start point to an end and successfully construct a route for others to follow both when the terrain is dynamic and static
    • HOx cycling during the Cyprus Photochemistry Experiment

      Mallik, Chinmay; Harder, Hartwig; Tomsche, Laura; Novelli, Anna; Martinez, Monica; Meusel, Hannah; Su, Hang; Kessel, Stephan; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Sauvage, Carina; et al. (Asia Oceania Geosciences Society, 2016-08-31)
      Abstract from attached
    • Hybrid Heat Pump for Micro Heat Network

      Counsell, John M.; Khalid, Yousaf; Stewart, M.; University of Chester (World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology (WASET), 2017-10-17)
      Achieving nearly zero carbon heating continues to be identified by UK government analysis as an important feature of any lowest cost pathway to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Heat currently accounts for 48% of UK energy consumption and approximately one third of UK’s greenhouse gas emissions. Heat Networks are being promoted by UK investment policies as one means of supporting hybrid heat pump based solutions. To this effect the RISE (Renewable Integrated and Sustainable Electric) heating system project is investigating how an all-electric heating sourceshybrid configuration could play a key role in long-term decarbonisation of heat. For the purposes of this study, hybrid systems are defined as systems combining the technologies of an electric driven air source heat pump, electric powered thermal storage, a thermal vessel and micro-heat network as an integrated system. This hybrid strategy allows for the system to store up energy during periods of low electricity demand from the national grid, turning it into a dynamic supply of low cost heat which is utilized only when required. Currently a prototype of such a system is being tested in a modern house integrated with advanced controls and sensors. This paper presents the virtual performance analysis of the system and its design for a micro heat network with multiple dwelling units. The results show that the RISE system is controllable and can reduce carbon emissions whilst being competitive in running costs with a conventional gas boiler heating system.
    • Identification of the initial function for discretized delay differential equations

      Baker, Christopher T. H.; Parmuzin, Evgeny I.; University College Chester ; Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences (Elsevier, 2005-09-15)
      In the present work, we analyze a discrete analogue for the problem of the identification of the initial function for a delay differential equation (DDE) discussed by Baker and Parmuzin in 2004. The basic problem consists of finding an initial function that gives rise to a solution of a discretized DDE, which is a close fit to observed data.
    • Identification of the initial function for nonlinear delay differential equations

      Baker, Christopher T. H.; Parmuzin, Evgeny I.; University College Chester ; Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences (de Gruyter, 2005)
      We consider a 'data assimilation problem' for nonlinear delay differential equations. Our problem is to find an initial function that gives rise to a solution of a given nonlinear delay differential equation, which is a close fit to observed data. A role for adjoint equations and fundamental solutions in the nonlinear case is established. A 'pseudo-Newton' method is presented. Our results extend those given by the authors in [(C. T. H. Baker and E. I. Parmuzin, Identification of the initial function for delay differential equation: Part I: The continuous problem & an integral equation analysis. NA Report No. 431, MCCM, Manchester, England, 2004.), (C. T. H. Baker and E. I. Parmuzin, Analysis via integral equations of an identification problem for delay differential equations. J. Int. Equations Appl. (2004) 16, 111–135.)] for the case of linear delay differential equations.
    • Identifying Criegee intermediates as potential oxidants in the troposphere

      Novelli, Anna; Hens, Korbinian; Tatum-Ernest, Cheryl; Martinez, Monica; Noelscher, Anke C.; Sinha, Vinayak; Paasonen, Pauli; Petaja, Tuukka; Sipila, Mikko; Elste, Thomas; et al. (American Geophysical Union, 2015-10)
      Criegee intermediates (CI) are formed during the ozonolysis of unsaturated compounds and have been intensively studied in the last few years due to their possible role as oxidants in the troposphere. Stabilised CI (SCI) are now known to react very rapidly, k(298 K) = 10-12 to 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, with a large number of trace gases (SO2, NO2, organic acids, water dimers). Still, it remains challenging to assess their effective oxidative capacity, as CI chemistry is complex, spans a large range of rate coefficients for different SCI conformers reacting with water dimers and trace gases, and in addition no reliable measurement technique able to detect ambient SCI concentrations is currently available. In this study, we examine the extensive dataset from the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 and the HOPE 2012 field campaigns, aided by literature data, to estimate the abundance of SCI in the lower troposphere. The budget of SCI is analyzed using four different approaches: 1) based on an observed yet unexplained H2SO4 production; 2) from the measured concentrations of unsaturated volatile organic compounds (VOC); 3) from OH reactivity measurements; 4) from the unexplained production rate of OH. A SCI concentration range between 5 x 103 and 2 x 106 molecule cm-3 is calculated for the two environments. The central weighted estimate of the SCI concentration over the boreal forest of ~ 5 x 104 molecules cm-3 implies a significant impact on the conversion of SO2 into H2SO4. In addition, we present measurements obtained using our inlet pre-injector laser-induced fluorescence assay by gas expansion technique (IPI-LIF-FAGE) for the above-mentioned campaigns. A recent laboratory study performed with the same instrumental setup showed that the IPI-LIF-FAGE system is sensitive to the detection of the OH formed from unimolecular decomposition of SCI. Building on these measurements, the background OH (OHbg) measured during the two field campaigns is investigated in comparison with many other trace gases to assess if the observations in controlled conditions are transferable to ambient conditions.
    • Identifying Criegee intermediates as potential oxidants in the troposphere

      Novelli, Anna; Hens, Korbinian; Tatum-Ernest, Cheryl; Martinez, Monica; Noelscher, Anke C.; Sinha, Vinayak; Paasonen, Pauli; Petaja, Tuukka; Sipila, Mikko; Elste, Thomas; et al. (Copernicus Publications, 2017-06-29)
      We analysed the extensive dataset from the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 and the HOPE 2012 field campaigns in the boreal forest and rural environments of Finland and Germany, respectively, and estimated the abundance of stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCI) in the lower troposphere. Based on laboratory tests, we propose that the background OH signal observed in our IPI-LIF-FAGE instrument during the afore-mentioned campaigns is caused at least partially by SCI. This hypothesis is based on observed correlations with temperature and with concentrations of unsaturated volatile organic compounds and ozone. The background OH concentration also complements the previously underestimated production rate of sulfuric acid and is consistent with its scavenging through the addition of sulphur dioxide. A central estimate of the SCI concentration of ~ 5 × 104 molecules cm−3 (with an order of magnitude uncertainty) is calculated for the two environments. This implies a very low ambient concentration of SCI, though, over the boreal forest, significant for the conversion of SO2 into H2SO4. The large uncertainties in these calculations, owing to the many unknowns in the chemistry of Criegee intermediates, emphasise the need to better understand these processes and their potential effect on the self-cleaning capacity of the atmosphere.
    • Imaging of gas–liquid annular flows for underbalanced drilling using electrical resistance tomography

      Na, Wei; Jia, Jiabin; Yu, Xin; Faraj, Yousef; Wang, Qiang; Meng, Ying-feng; Wang, Mi; Sun, Wantong; University of Chester; University of Leeds; University of Edinburgh; Southwest Petroleum University (China) (Elsevier, 2015-07-21)
      The underbalanced drilling technique, which is also known as managed-pressure drilling, is playing an important role in oil and gas sector, as it reduces common conventional drilling problems such as minimal drilling rates and formation damage, differential sticking and lost circulation. Flow regime monitoring is one of the key topics in annular multiphase flow research, particularly for underbalanced drilling technique. Prediction of the prevailing flow regime in an annulus is of particular importance in the design and installation of underbalanced drilling facilities. Especially, for establishing a suitable pressure drop model based on the characteristics of the active flow regime. The methods of flow regime prediction (or visualisation) in an annulus that are currently in use are very limited, this is evidently due to poor accuracy or they are simply not applicable to underbalanced drilling operation in practice. Therefore, this paper presents a monitoring method, in which Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) is used to rapidly image the prevailing flow regime in an annulus with a metallic inner pipe. Experiments were carried out using an air–waterflow loop with a test section 50 mm diameter flow pipe. The two-phase air–waterflow regimes are visualised in the upward vertical annulus with a radius ratio (r/R) 0.4.This paper highlights the visualisation results of only three flow regimes, namely bubble flow, transitional bubble-slug flow and slug flow. The flow regimes are visualised through axial images stacked from50 mm diameter-pixels of 2D tomograms reconstructed with the Conjugate Gradient Method (SCG). Gas volume fraction profiles within the annular flow channel are also illustrated. The profiles are extracted using the Modified Sensitivity coefficient Back-Projection (MSBP) method with a sensitivity matrix generated from a realistic phantom in the finite element method software. The results are compared with visual observations (e.g. photographs) of the active flow regime at the time of ERT measurements.
    • Impact Damage Characteristics of Carbon Fibre Metal Laminates: Experiments and Simulation

      Shi, Yu; Soutis, Constantinos; Pinna, Christophe; University of Chester; The University of Sheffield; The University of Manchester
      In this work, the impact response of carbon fibre metal laminates (FMLs) was experimentally and numerically studied with an improved design of the fibre composite lay-up for optimal mechanical properties and damage resistance. Two different stacking sequences (Carall 3–3/2–0.5 and Carall 5–3/2–0.5) were designed and characterised. Damage at relatively low energy impact energies (≤30 J) was investigated using Ultrasonic C-scanning and X–ray Computed Tomography (X-RCT). A 3D finite element model was developed to simulate the impact induced damage in both metal and composite layers using Abaqus/Explicit. Cohesive zone elements were introduced to capture delamination occurring between carbon fibre/epoxy plies and debonding at the interfaces between aluminium and the composite layers. Carall 5–3/2–0.5 was found to absorb more energy elastically, which indicates better resistance to damage. A good agreement is obtained between the numerically predicted results and experimental measurements in terms of force and absorbed energy during impact where the damage modes such as delamination was well simulated when compared to non-destructive techniques (NDT).
    • Impact of Functionalized Polystyrenes as the Electron Injection Layer on Gold and Aluminum Surfaces: A Combined Theoretical and Experimental Study

      Papadopoulos, Theodoros A.; Li, Hong; Kim, Eung-Gun; Liu, Jie; Cella, James A.; Heller, Christian M.; Shu, Andrew; Kahn, Antoine; Duggal, Anil; Brédas, Jean-Luc; et al. (Wiley, 2014-06-06)
      At metal/organic interfaces, insertion of an organic monolayer can significantly modify the surface properties of the substrate, especially in terms of charge injection across the interface. Here, we study the formation of an insulating monolayer of morpholine or amine-functionalized polystyrene on Al(111) and Au(111) surfaces and its impact on surface work-function and charge injection. First principles calculations based on density functional theory have been carried out and point to a significant decrease of the work-function for the modified metal surfaces, in very good agreement with ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy measurements performed on the Au(111) surface. In addition, a bilayer cathode consisting of a thin film of high work-function metal, such as Al and Au, and a layer of amine-functionalized polystyrene is also fabricated and tested in organic light-emitting diodes. Such bilayer structures exhibit substantially enhanced efficiency when compared to controls without the functionalized polymers. Our combined theoretical and experimental investigation gives insight into how a thin layer of a commodity polymer can be used to transform rather high work-function metals into high-performance cathodes providing efficient electron injection.
    • Impact of the operating conditions and position of exhaust gas recirculation on the performance of a micro gas turbine

      Ali, Usman; Font Palma, Carolina; Hughes, Kevin J.; Ingham, Derek B.; Ma, Lin; Pourkashanian, Mohamed; University of Chester/University of Leeds (Elsevier, 2015-06-10)
      Gas turbines are a viable and secure option both economically and environmentally for power and heat generation. The process simulation of the micro gas turbine with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and its impact on performance is evaluated. This study is further extended to evaluate the effect of the operating conditions and position of the EGR on the performance of the micro gas turbine. The performance analysis for different configurations of the EGR cycle, as well as flue gas condensation temperature, results in the optimized position of EGR at the compressor inlet with partial condensation resulting in the CO2 enhancement to 3.7 mol%.
    • Impedance coordinative control for cascaded converter in bidirectional application

      Tian, Yanjun; Deng, Fujin; Chen, Zhe; Sun, Xiaofeng; Hu, Yanting; University of Chester (IEEE, 2015-06-30)
      Two stage cascaded converters are widely used in bidirectional applications, but the negative impedance may cause system instability. Actually the impedance interaction is much different between forward power flow and reversed power flow, which will introduce more uncertainty to the system stability. This paper proposes a control method for the constant power controlled converter in cascaded system, and consequently it can change the negative impedance of constant power converter into resistive impedance, which will improve the cascaded system stability, as well as merge the impedance difference between forward and reversed power flow. This paper addresses the analysis with the topology of cascaded dual-active-bridge converter (DAB) with inverter, and the proposed control method can also be implemented in unidirectional applications and other general cascaded converter system. The effectiveness has been validated by both simulation and experimental results.
    • Impedance interaction modeling and analysis for bidirectional cascaded converters

      Tian, Yanjun; Deng, Fujin; Chen, Zhe; Sun, Xiaofeng; Hu, Yanting (2015-06-30)
      For the cascaded converter system, the output impedance of source converter interacts with the input impedance of load converter, and the interaction may cause the system instability. In bidirectional applications, when the power flow is reversed, the impedance interaction also varies, which brings more uncertainty to the system stability. An investigation is performed here for showing that the forward and reverse interactions are prominently different in terms of dynamics and stability even though the cascaded converter control remains unchanged. An important guideline has been drawn for the control of the cascaded converter. That is when voltage mode converter working as the load converter; the constant power mode converter as the source converter, the system is more stable. The concluded findings have been verified by simulation and experimental results.
    • The Implementation and Validation of a Virtual Environment for Training Powered Wheelchair Manoeuvres

      John, Nigel W.; Pop, Serban R.; Day, Thomas W.; Ritsos, Panagiotis D.; Headleand, Christopher J.; University of Chester; Bangor University; University of Lincoln (IEEE, 2017-05-02)
      Navigating a powered wheelchair and avoiding collisions is often a daunting task for new wheelchair users. It takes time and practice to gain the coordination needed to become a competent driver and this can be even more of a challenge for someone with a disability. We present a cost-effective virtual reality (VR) application that takes advantage of consumer level VR hardware. The system can be easily deployed in an assessment centre or for home use, and does not depend on a specialized high-end virtual environment such as a Powerwall or CAVE. This paper reviews previous work that has used virtual environments technology for training tasks, particularly wheelchair simulation. We then describe the implementation of our own system and the first validation study carried out using thirty three able bodied volunteers. The study results indicate that at a significance level of 5% then there is an improvement in driving skills from the use of our VR system. We thus have the potential to develop the competency of a wheelchair user whilst avoiding the risks inherent to training in the real world. However, the occurrence of cybersickness is a particular problem in this application that will need to be addressed.
    • An implicit finite difference approximation for the solution of the diffusion equation with distributed order in time

      Ford, Neville J.; Morgado, Maria L.; Rebelo, Magda S.; University of Chester, UTAD, Portugal, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal (Kent State University/Johann Radon Institute for Computational and Applied Mathematics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, 2015-06-10)
      In this paper we are concerned with the numerical solution of a diffusion equation in which the time order derivative is distributed over the interval [0,1]. An implicit numerical method is presented and its unconditional stability and convergence are proved. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the obtained theoretical results.
    • The Importance of Cell Compression Pressure for Flow Battery Performance

      Davies, Trevor J.; Gunn, Natasha; Ward, David; University of Chester (The International Flow Battery Forum, 2016-06-30)
      Compared to fuel cells, which possess similar cell architecture, flow batteries have poor performance. For example, conventional fuel cells can easily achieve current densities of 1.5 A cm-2 whereas the corresponding figure for the all vanadium flow battery (VFB) is an order of magnitude less, often less than 0.2 A cm 2 [1]. Consequently, relatively large flow battery cells are required for a given power, increasing the cost of the technology. There are a few noticeable exceptions to the relatively poor performance of flow batteries, including the work of Zawodzinski et al. who achieved current densities in excess of 0.8 A cm 2 with a VFB [2]. Most impressively, Weber and co-workers achieved current densities as high as 4 A cm 2 with a H2-Br2 flow battery [3]. In both cases, the researchers used fuel cell components and fuel cell assembly techniques to minimize the cell ohmic resistance, particularly the contact resistance between the cell parts (electrodes, bipolar plates and current collectors). Typically, fuel cells are assembled using compression pressures of above 8 bar to minimize contact resistance. In comparison, flow batteries use compression pressures less than 1 bar during cell assembly with carbon fibre felt electrodes; hence contact resistance values are relatively high. A number of studies have measured the effect of felt compression on battery performance [4-5], where the felt compression is increased from 0 to 30%, resulting in a decrease in cell resistance and a noticeable improvement in performance. This study builds on previous felt compression work by exploring a much wider range of electrode compression pressures in a VFB system.
    • An improved discrete wavelet transform preconditioner for dense matrix problems

      Ford, Judith M.; Chester College of Higher Education (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, 2003-12)
    • Improved Stability of Polymer Solar Cells in Ambient Air via Atomic Layer Deposition of Ultra-Thin Dielectric Layers

      Polydorou, Ermioni; Botzakaki, Martha A.; Sakellis, Ilias; Soultati, Anastasia; Kaltzoglou, Andreas; Papadopoulos, Theodoros A.; Briscoe, Joe; Drivas, Charalabos; Seintis, Kostas; Fakis, Mihalis; et al. (Wiley, 2017-07-12)
      Polymer solar cells have attracted tremendous interest in the highly competitive solar energy sector, due to the practical advantages they exhibit, such as being lightweight, flexible, and low cost, in stark contrast to traditional photovoltaic technologies. However, their successful commercialization is still hindered by issues related to device instability. Here, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is employed to deposit conformal ultrathin dielectrics, such as alumina (Al2O3) and zirconia (ZrO2), on top of ZnO electron extraction layers to address problems that arise from the defect-rich nature of these layers. The deposition of dielectrics on ZnO significantly improves its interfacial electronic properties, manifested primarily with the decrease in the work function of ZnO and the concomitant reduction of the electron extraction barrier as well as the reduced recombination losses. Significant efficiency enhancement is obtained with the incorporation of six ALD cycles of Al2O3 into inverted devices, using photoactive layers, that consist of poly(3-hexylthiophene):indene-C60-bisadduct or poly({4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene-2,6-diyl}{3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl] thieno[3,4-b] thiophenediyl}):[6,6]-phenyl-C70-butyric acid methyl ester. More importantly, upon performing lifetime studies (over a period of 350 h), a strong improvement in polymer solar cell stability is observed when using the ALD-modified ZnO films.