Based at Thornton Science Park, the new Faculty of Science and Engineering is located in a major research and innovation hub for the North West which is only a 20-minute bus trip from the main Chester Campus. The Faculty offers degrees in engineering and science disciplines using a strongly interdisciplinary teaching philosophy.

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  • Hybrid Heat Pump for Micro Heat Network

    Counsell, M. J.; Khalid, Yousaf; Stewart, M.; University of Chester (World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology (WASET), 2017-10-17)
    Achieving nearly zero carbon heating continues to be identified by UK government analysis as an important feature of any lowest cost pathway to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Heat currently accounts for 48% of UK energy consumption and approximately one third of UK’s greenhouse gas emissions. Heat Networks are being promoted by UK investment policies as one means of supporting hybrid heat pump based solutions. To this effect the RISE (Renewable Integrated and Sustainable Electric) heating system project is investigating how an all-electric heating sourceshybrid configuration could play a key role in long-term decarbonisation of heat. For the purposes of this study, hybrid systems are defined as systems combining the technologies of an electric driven air source heat pump, electric powered thermal storage, a thermal vessel and micro-heat network as an integrated system. This hybrid strategy allows for the system to store up energy during periods of low electricity demand from the national grid, turning it into a dynamic supply of low cost heat which is utilized only when required. Currently a prototype of such a system is being tested in a modern house integrated with advanced controls and sensors. This paper presents the virtual performance analysis of the system and its design for a micro heat network with multiple dwelling units. The results show that the RISE system is controllable and can reduce carbon emissions whilst being competitive in running costs with a conventional gas boiler heating system.
  • Oxidation processes in the eastern Mediterranean atmosphere: evidence from the modelling of HOx measurements over Cyprus

    Mallik, Chinmay; Tomsche, Laura; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Crowley, John; Derstroff, Bettina; Fischer, Horst; Haferman, Sascha; Hueser, Imke; Javed, Umar; Kessel, Stephan; Lelieveld, Jos; Martinez, Monica; Meusel, Hannah; Novelli, Anna; Phillips, Gavin; Pozzer, Andrea; Reiffs, Andreas; Sander, Rolf; Taraborrelli, Domenico; Sauvage, Carina; Schuladen, Jan; Su, Hang; Williams, Jonathan; Harder, Hartwig; Max Planck Institute for Chemistry; Cyprus Institute; Forschungzentrum Juelich; University of Chester (Copernicus Publications, 2018-07-31)
    The Mediterranean is a climatically sensitive region located at the crossroads of air masses from three continents: Europe, Africa, and Asia. The chemical processing of air masses over this region has implications not only for the air quality but also for the long-range transport of air pollution. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of oxidation processes over the Mediterranean, atmospheric concentrations of the hydroxyl radical (OH) and the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) were measured during an intensive field campaign (CYprus PHotochemistry EXperiment, CYPHEX-2014) in the northwest of Cyprus in the summer of 2014. Very low local anthropogenic and biogenic emissions around the measurement location provided a vantage point to study the contrasts in atmospheric oxidation pathways under highly processed marine air masses and those influenced by relatively fresh emissions from mainland Europe. The CYPHEX measurements were used to evaluate OH and HO2 simulations using a photochemical box model (CAABA/MECCA) constrained with CYPHEX observations of O3, CO, NOx, hydrocarbons, peroxides, and other major HOx (OH+HO2) sources and sinks in a low-NOx environment (<100pptv of NO). The model simulations for OH agreed to within 10% with in situ OH observations. Model simulations for HO2 agreed to within 17% of the in situ observations. However, the model strongly under-predicted HO2 at high terpene concentrations, this under-prediction reaching up to 38% at the highest terpene levels. Different schemes to improve the agreement between observed and modelled HO2, including changing the rate coefficients for the reactions of terpene-generated peroxy radicals (RO2) with NO and HO2 as well as the autoxidation of terpene-generated RO2 species, are explored in this work. The main source of OH in Cyprus was its primary production from O3 photolysis during the day and HONO photolysis during early morning. Recycling contributed about one-third of the total OH production, and the maximum recycling efficiency was about 0.7. CO, which was the largest OH sink, was also the largest HO2 source. The lowest HOx production and losses occurred when the air masses had higher residence time over the oceans.
  • Effect of Temperature and Catholyte Concentration on the Performance of a Chemically Regenerative Fuel Cell POM-based catholytes for platinum-free polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Ward, David B.; Davies, Trevor J.; University of Chester (JOHNSON MATTHEY, plc, 2018-04-01)
    Chemically regenerative redox cathode (CRRC) polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are attracting more interest as a platinum-free PEFC technology. These fuel cells utilise a liquid catalyst or catholyte, to perform the indirect reduction of oxygen, eliminating the major degradation mechanisms that plague PEFC durability. A key component of a CRRC PEFC system is the catholyte. This article reports a thorough study of the effect of catholyte concentration and temperature on CRRC PEFC system performance for H7PV4Mo8O40 and Na4H3PV4Mo8O40, two promising polyoxometalate (POM)-based catholytes. The results suggest 80ºC and a catholyte concentration of 0.3 M provide the optimum performance for both H7PV4Mo8O40 and Na4H3PV4Mo8O40 (for ambient pressure operation).
  • Predicting the critical heat flux in pool boiling based on hydrodynamic instability induced irreversible hot spots

    Zhao, Huayong; Williams, Andrew; Loughborough University; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2018-03-07)
    A new model, based on the experimental observation reported in the literature that CHF is triggered by the Irreversible Hot Spots (IHS), has been developed to predict the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) in pool boiling. The developed Irreversible Hot Spot (IHS) model can predict the CHF when boiling methanol on small flat surfaces and long horizontal cylinders of different sizes to within 5% uncertainty. It can also predict the effect of changing wettability (i.e. contact angle) on CHF to within 10% uncertainty for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. In addition, a linear empirical correlation has been developed to model the bubble growth rate as a function of the system pressure. The IHS model with this linear bubble growth coefficient correlation can predict the CHF when boiling water on both flat surfaces and long horizontal cylinders to within 5% uncertainty up to 10 bar system pressure, and the CHF when boiling methanol on a flat surface to within 10% uncertainty up to 5 bar. The predicted detailed bubble grow and merge process from various sub-models are also in good agreement with the experimental results reported in the literature.
  • Gastrointestinal Stents: Materials and Designs

    Black, Steven J.; Edwards, Derek W.; Smith, Graham C.; Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; MDECON Ltd.; The Christie NHS Foundation Trust; University of Chester (Thieme Publishing, 2018-05-09)
    Over the last 25 years stents have developed into an established way of restoring luminal patency throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Materials used as well as the construction of these devices have become more and more sophisticated in order to comply better with the complex environment they are inserted. The requirements vary greatly from organ to organ and stent behavior differs significantly between stent constructions. However this is not necessarily understood by many operators, as the choice of devices is now vast and in many cases decisions are made on availability and cost. An increasing challenge in malignant conditions is the improving survival of incurable patients, which now exceeds the traditional life expectancy of a stent by a factor of 2 to 3. Consequently more patients experience failure of their stent and require repeat interventions. This has a poor impact on patients’ quality of life and potentially on their survival. Re-intervention is often more difficult, carries the risk of additional complications and presents an additional economic burden to the health systems. This article illustrates current stent designs, their different behavior and their limitations.
  • A micromachined device describing over a hundred orders of parametric resonance

    Jia, Yu; Du, Sijun; Arroyo, Emmanuelle; Seshia, Ashwin A.; University of Cambridge; University of Chester (AIP Publishing, 2018-04-24)
    Parametric resonance in mechanical oscillators can onset from the periodic modulation of at least one of the system parameters, and the behaviour of the principal (1st order) parametric resonance has long been well established. However, the theoretically predicted higher orders of parametric resonance, in excess of the first few orders, have mostly been experimentally elusive due to the fast diminishing instability intervals. A recent paper experimentally reported up to 28 orders in a micromachined membrane oscillator. This paper reports the design and characterisation of a micromachined membrane oscillator with a segmented proof mass topology, in an attempt to amplify the inherent nonlinearities within the membrane layer. The resultant oscillator device exhibited up to over a hundred orders of parametric resonance, thus experimentally validating these ultra-high orders as well as overlapping instability transitions between these higher orders. This research introduces design possibilities for the transducer and dynamic communities, by exploiting the behaviour of these previously elusive higher order resonant regimes.
  • Evidence for the Perception of Time Distortion During Episodes of Alice in Wonderland Syndrome

    Jia, Yu; Miao. Ying; University of Chester; Aston University (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018-05-17)
    Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS) is a rare perceptual disorder associated with sensation of one or several visual and/or auditory perceptual distortions including size of body parts, size of external objects, or passage of time (either speeding up or slowing down). Cause for AIWS is yet to be widely agreed, and the implications are widely varied. One of the research difficulties is the brevity of each episode, typically not exceeding few tens of minutes. This article presents a male adult in late 20s who has apparently experienced AIWS episodes since childhood, and infection has been ruled out. Reaction speed tests were conducted during and after AIWS episodes, across a span of 13 months. Statistically significant evidence is present for delayed response time during AIWS episodes when the patient claims to experience a sensation of time distortion: where events seem to move faster and people appear to speak quicker.
  • Bioinspired bactericidal surfaces with polymer nanocone arrays

    Hazell, Gavin; Fisher, Leanne E.; Murray, W. Andrew; Nobbs, Angela H.; Su, Bo; University of Chester; University of Bristol (Elsevier, 2018-05-28)
    Infections resulting from bacterial biofilm formation on the surface of medical devices are challenging to treat and can cause significant patient morbidity. Recently, it has become apparent that regulation of surface nanotopography can render surfaces bactericidal. In this study, poly(ethylene terephthalate) nanocone arrays are generated through a polystyrene nanosphere-mask colloidal lithographic process. It is shown that modification of the mask diameter leads to a direct modification of centre-to-centre spacing between nanocones. By altering the oxygen plasma etching time it is possible to modify the height, tip width and base diameter of the individual nanocone features. The bactericidal activity of the nanocone arrays was investigated against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. It is shown that surfaces with the most densely populated nanocone arrays (center-to-center spacing of 200 nm), higher aspect ratios (>3) and tip widths <20 nm kill the highest percentage of bacteria (∼30%).
  • A posteriori error estimates for fully discrete schemes for the time dependent Stokes problem

    Baensch, Eberhard; Karakatsani, Fotini; Makridakis, Charalambos; University of Erlangen; University of Chester; University of Crete; Foundation for Research & Technology, Greece; University of Sussex (Springer, 2018-05-02)
    This work is devoted to a posteriori error analysis of fully discrete finite element approximations to the time dependent Stokes system. The space discretization is based on popular stable spaces, including Crouzeix–Raviart and Taylor–Hood finite element methods. Implicit Euler is applied for the time discretization. The finite element spaces are allowed to change with time steps and the projection steps include alternatives that is hoped to cope with possible numerical artifices and the loss of the discrete incompressibility of the schemes. The final estimates are of optimal order in L∞(L2) for the velocity error.
  • The role of DNA methylation in ageing and cancer

    Morgan, Amy; Davies, Trevor; Mc Auley, Mark T.; University of Chester (Cambridge University Press, 2018-04-30)
    The aim of the present review paper is to survey the literature related to DNA methylation, and its association with cancer and ageing. The review will outline the key factors, including diet, which modulate DNA methylation. Our rationale for conducting this review is that ageing and diseases, including cancer, are often accompanied by aberrant DNA methylation, a key epigenetic process, which is crucial to the regulation of gene expression. Significantly, it has been observed that with age and certain disease states, DNA methylation status can become disrupted. For instance, a broad array of cancers are associated with promoter-specific hypermethylation and concomitant gene silencing. This review highlights that hypermethylation, and gene silencing, of the EN1 gene promoter, a crucial homeobox gene, has been detected in various forms of cancer. This has led to this region being proposed as a potential biomarker for diseases such as cancer. We conclude the review by describing a recently developed novel electrochemical method that can be used to quantify the level of methylation within the EN1 promoter and emphasise the growing trend in the use of electrochemical techniques for the detection of aberrant DNA methylation.
  • Malliavin Calculus for the stochastic Cahn- Hilliard/Allen-Cahn equation with unbounded noise diffusion

    Antonopoulou, Dimitra; Farazakis, Dimitris; Karali, Georgia D.; University of Chester; Foundation for Research and Technology; University of Crete (Elsevier, 2018-05-08)
    The stochastic partial di erential equation analyzed in this work, is motivated by a simplified mesoscopic physical model for phase separation. It describes pattern formation due to adsorption and desorption mechanisms involved in surface processes, in the presence of a stochastic driving force. This equation is a combination of Cahn-Hilliard and Allen-Cahn type operators with a multiplicative, white, space-time noise of unbounded di usion. We apply Malliavin calculus, in order to investigate the existence of a density for the stochastic solution u. In dimension one, according to the regularity result in [5], u admits continuous paths a.s. Using this property, and inspired by a method proposed in [8], we construct a modi ed approximating sequence for u, which properly treats the new second order Allen-Cahn operator. Under a localization argument, we prove that the Malliavin derivative of u exists locally, and that the law of u is absolutely continuous, establishing thus that a density exists.
  • Studies of black silicon and black diamond as materials for antibacterial surfaces

    Hazell, Gavin; May, P. W.; Taylor, P.; Nobbs, A. H. N.; Su, B.; University of Bristol; Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology (Royal Society of Chemistry, 2018-03-27)
    ‘Black silicon’ (bSi) samples with surfaces covered in nanoneedles of varying length, areal density and sharpness, have been fabricated using a plasma etching process. These nanostructures were then coated with a conformal uniform layer of diamond using hot filament chemical vapour deposition to produce ‘black diamond’ (bD) surfaces. The effectiveness of these bSi and bD surfaces in killing Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (S. gordonii) bacteria was investigated by culturing the bacteria on the surfaces for a set time and then measuring the live-to-dead ratio. All the nanostructured surfaces killed E. coli at a significantly higher rate than the respective flat Si or diamond control samples. The length of the needles was found to be less important than their separation, i.e. areal density. This is consistent with a model for mechanical bacteria death based on the stretching and disruption of the cell membrane, enhanced by the cells motility on the surfaces. In contrast, S. gordonii were unaffected by the nanostructured surfaces, possibly due to their smaller size, thicker cell membrane and/or their lack of motility.
  • Controllability of buildings: computing and managing energy in practice

    Khalid, Yousaf; University of Chester (Journal of Computing and Management Studies (JCMS), 2018-05)
    Modern buildings utilise multiple systems for energy generation, supply and storage in order to maintain occupant comfort. Consequently, complex computer based energy management systems are utilised for design and operation of such buildings. Often these buildings perform poor in practice in terms of energy consumption, cost and carbon emissions due to lack of thorough analysis of their controllability during the design process. This paper highlights the deficiencies in the current building design practice and the need for appropriate framework to assess controllability of buildings during design stages so that complex building energy systems are easier to manage in practice.
  • A finite element analysis of impact damage in composite laminates

    Shi, Yu; Soutis, Constantinos; University of Chester; University of Manchester (Cambridge University Press, 2012-12-01)
    In this work, stress-based and fracture mechanics criteria were developed to predict initiation and evolution, respectively, of intra- and inter-laminar cracking developed in composite laminates subjected to low velocity impact. The Soutis shear stress-strain semi-empirical model was used to describe the nonlinear shear behaviour of the composite. The damage model was implemented in the finite element (FE) code (Abaqus/Explicit) by a user-defined material subroutine (VUMAT). Delamination (or inter-laminar cracking) was modelled using interface cohesive elements and the splitting and transverse matrix cracks that appeared within individual plies were also simulated by inserting cohesive elements between neighbouring elements parallel to the fibre direction in each single layer. A good agreement was obtained when compared the numerically predicted results to experimentally obtained curves of impact force and absorbed energy versus time. A non-destructive technique (NDT), penetrant enhanced X-ray radiography, was used to observe the various damage mechanisms induced by impact. It has been shown that the proposed damage model can successfully capture the internal damage pattern and the extent to which it was developed in these carbon fibre/epoxy composite laminates.
  • Thermophoresis effect on the free convective flow in a differentially heated square cavity

    Pop, Serban R.; Grosan, Teodor; University of Chester; Babes-Bolyai University of Cluj Napoca (Begell House, 2015)
    A numerical analysis is made for thermophoretic transport of small particles through the convective flow in a differentially heated square cavity. The governing gas-particle partial differential equations are solved numerically for some values of the considered parameters to investigate their influence on the flow, heat, and mass transfer patterns. It is found that the effect of thermophoresis can be quite significant in appropriate situations.
  • Mass-producible 2D-MoSe2 bulk modified screen-printed electrodes provide significant electrocatalytic performances towards the hydrogen evolution reaction

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J.; Foster, Christopher W.; Smith, Graham C.; Brownson, Dale A. C.; Banks, Craig E.; Manchester Metropolitan University; University of Chester (Royal Society of Chemistry, 2017-01-25)
    We demonstrate a facile, low cost and reproducible methodology for the production of electrocatalytic 2D-MoSe2 incorporated/bulk modified screen-printed electrodes (MoSe2-SPEs). The MoSe2-SPEs outperform traditional carbon based electrodes, in terms of their electrochemical activity, towards the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER). The electrocatalytic behaviour towards the HER of the 2D-MoSe2 within the fabricated electrodes is found to be mass dependent, with an optimal mass ratio of 10% 2D-MoSe2 to 90% carbon ink. MoSe2-SPEs with this optimised ratio exhibit a HER onset, Tafel value and a turn over frequency of ca. −460 mV (vs. SCE), 47 mV dec−1 and 1.48 respectively. These values far exceed the HER performance of graphite (unmodified) SPEs, that exhibit a greater electronegative HER onset and Tafel value of ca. −880 mV and 120 mV dec−1 respectively. It is clear that impregnation of 2D-MoSe2 into the MoSe2-SPEs bulk ink/structure significantly increases the performance of SPEs with respect to their electrocatalytic activity towards the HER. When compared to SPEs that have been modified via a drop-casting technique, the fabricated MoSe2-SPEs exhibit excellent cycling stability. After 1000 repeat scans, a 10% modified MoSe2-SPE displayed no change in its HER onset potential of −450 mV (vs. SCE) and an increase of 31.6% in achievable current density. Conversely, a SPE modified via drop-casting with 400 mg cm−2 of 2D-MoSe2 maintained its HER onset potential of −480 mV (vs. SCE), however exhibited a 27.4% decrease in its achievable current density after 1000 scans. In addition to the clear performance benefits, the production of MoSe2-SPEs mitigates the need to post hoc modify an electrode via the drop-casting technique. We anticipate that this facile production method will serve as a powerful tool for future studies seeking to utilise 2D materials in order to mass-produce SPEs/surfaces with unique electrochemical properties whilst providing substantial stability improvements over the traditionally utilised technique of drop-casting.
  • Non-Local Partial Differential Equations for Engineering and Biology: Mathematical Modeling and Analysis

    Kavallaris, Nikos I.; Suzuki, Takashi; University of Chester; Osaka University (Springer, 2017-12-31)
    This book presents new developments in non-local mathematical modeling and mathematical analysis on the behavior of solutions with novel technical tools. Theoretical backgrounds in mechanics, thermo-dynamics, game theory, and theoretical biology are examined in details. It starts off with a review and summary of the basic ideas of mathematical modeling frequently used in the sciences and engineering. The authors then employ a number of models in bio-science and material science to demonstrate applications, and provide recent advanced studies, both on deterministic non-local partial differential equations and on some of their stochastic counterparts used in engineering. Mathematical models applied in engineering, chemistry, and biology are subject to conservation laws. For instance, decrease or increase in thermodynamic quantities and non-local partial differential equations, associated with the conserved physical quantities as parameters. These present novel mathematical objects are engaged with rich mathematical structures, in accordance with the interactions between species or individuals, self-organization, pattern formation, hysteresis. These models are based on various laws of physics, such as mechanics of continuum, electro-magnetic theory, and thermodynamics. This is why many areas of mathematics, calculus of variation, dynamical systems, integrable systems, blow-up analysis, and energy methods are indispensable in understanding and analyzing these phenomena. This book aims for researchers and upper grades students in mathematics, engineering, physics, economics, and biology.
  • Mass-Producible 2D-MoS2‑Impregnated Screen-Printed Electrodes

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J.; Smith, Graham C.; Banks, Craig E.; Manchester Metropolitan University; University of Chester; (American Chemical Society, 2017-06-02)
    Two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (2D-MoS2) screen-printed electrodes (2D-MoS2-SPEs) have been designed, fabricated, and evaluated toward the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) within acidic aqueous media. A screen-printable ink has been developed that allows for the tailoring of the 2D-MoS2 content/mass used in the fabrication of the 2D-MoS2-SPEs, which critically affects the observed ORR performance. In comparison to the graphite SPEs (G-SPEs), the 2D-MoS2-SPEs are shown to exhibit an electrocatalytic behavior toward the ORR which is found, critically, to be reliant upon the percentage mass incorporation of 2D-MoS2 in the 2D-MoS2-SPEs; a greater percentage mass of 2D-MoS2 incorporated into the 2D-MoS2-SPEs results in a significantly less electronegative ORR onset potential and a greater signal output (current density). Using optimally fabricated 2D-MoS2-SPEs, an ORR onset and a peak current of approximately +0.16 V [vs saturated calomel electrode (SCE)] and −1.62 mA cm–2, respectively, are observed, which exceeds the −0.53 V (vs SCE) and −635 μA cm–2 performance of unmodified G-SPEs, indicating an electrocatalytic response toward the ORR utilizing the 2D-MoS2-SPEs. An investigation of the underlying electrochemical reaction mechanism of the ORR within acidic aqueous solutions reveals that the reaction proceeds via a direct four-electron process for all of the 2D-MoS2-SPE variants studied herein, where oxygen is electrochemically favorably reduced to water. The fabricated 2D-MoS2-SPEs are found to exhibit no degradation in the observed achievable current over the course of 1000 repeat scans. The production of such inks and the resultant mass-producible 2D-MoS2-SPEs mitigates the need to modify post hoc an electrode via the drop-casting technique that has been previously shown to result in a loss of achievable current over the course of 1000 repeat scans. The 2D-MoS2-SPEs designed, fabricated, and tested herein could have commercial viability as electrocatalytic fuel cell electrodes because of being economical as a result of their scales of economy and inherent tailorability. The technique utilized herein to produce the 2D-MoS2-SPEs could be adapted for the incorporation of different 2D nanomaterials, resulting in SPEs with the inherent advantages identified above.
  • Quantification of the pressures generated during insertion of an epidural needle in labouring women of varying body mass indices

    Wee, M. Y. K.; Isaacs, R.; Vaughan, Neil; Dubey, V. N.; Parker, B.; University of Chester; Bournemouth University; Poole Hospital NHS Trust; West Hertfordshire NHS Trust; Southampton University Hospital (Heighten Science Publications, 2017-12-01)
    Objective: The primary aim of this study was to measure pressure generated on a Tuohy needle during the epidural procedure in labouring women of varying body mass indices (BMI) with a view of utilising the data for the future development of a high fi delity epidural simulator. High-fi delity epidural simulators have a role in improving training and safety but current simulators lack a realistic experience and can be improved. Methods: This study was approved by the National Research Ethics Service Committee South Central, Portsmouth (REC reference 11/SC/0196). After informed consent epidural needle insertion pressure was measured using a Portex 16-gauge Tuohy needle, loss-of-resistance syringe, a three-way tap, pressure transducer and a custom-designed wireless transmitter. This was performed in four groups of labouring women, stratified according to BMI kg/m2: 18-24.9; 25-34.9; 35-44.9 and >=45. One-way ANOVA was used to compare difference in needle insertion pressure between the BMI groups. A paired t-test was performed between BMI group 18-24.9 and the three other BMI groups. Ultrasound images of the lumbar spine were undertaken prior to the epidural procedure and lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed within 72h post-delivery. These images will be used in the development of a high fi delity epidural simulator. Results: The mean epidural needle insertion pressure of labouring women with BMI 18-24.9 was 461mmHg; BMI 25-34.9 was 430mmHg; BMI 35-44.9 was 415mmHg and BMI >=45 was 376mmHg, (p=0.52). Conclusion: Although statistically insignifi cant, the study did show a decreasing trend of epidural insertion pressure with increasing body mass indices.
  • Double-diffusive natural convection in a differentially heated wavy cavity under thermophoresis effect

    Grosan, Teodor; Sheremet, Mikhail A.; Pop, Ioan; Pop, Serban R.; Babes-Bolyai University; Tomsk State University; University of Chester (American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2018-02-28)
    A numerical analysis is made for thermophoretic transport of small particles through the convection in a differentially heated square cavity with a wavy wall. The governing gas-particle partial differential equations are solved numerically for some values of the considered parameters to investigate their influence on the flow, heat, and mass transfer patterns. It is found that the effect of thermophoresis can be quite significant in appropriate situations. The number of undualtions can essentially modify the heat transfer rate and fluid flow intensity.

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