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dc.contributor.authorMorris, Mike*
dc.contributor.authorLamb, Kevin L.*
dc.contributor.authorHayton, John*
dc.contributor.authorCotterrell, David*
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, John P.*
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-26T14:27:35Z
dc.date.available2013-03-26T14:27:35Z
dc.date.issued2010-03-30
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology, 2010, 109(5), pp. 983-988
dc.identifier.issn1439-6319en
dc.identifier.issn1439-6327en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00421-010-1439-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/276020
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine for the first time whether VO2max could be predicted accurately and reliably from a treadmill-based perceptually regulated exercise test (PRET) incorporating a safer and more practical upper limit of RPE 15 ("Hard") than used in previous investigations.
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlag
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.springer.com/biomed/human+physiology/journal/421en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European Journal of Applied Physiologyen_GB
dc.subjectVo2maxen_GB
dc.subjectratings of perceived exertion (RPE)en_GB
dc.titleThe validity and reliability of predicting maximal oxygen uptake from a treadmill-based sub-maximal perceptually regulated exercise testen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester ;
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiologyen_GB
dc.date.accepted2010-03-09
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine for the first time whether VO2max could be predicted accurately and reliably from a treadmill-based perceptually regulated exercise test (PRET) incorporating a safer and more practical upper limit of RPE 15 ("Hard") than used in previous investigations.


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