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dc.contributor.authorWynne, Deborah*
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-15T16:24:43Zen
dc.date.available2012-06-15T16:24:43Zen
dc.date.issued2006-12-20en
dc.identifier.citationWynne, D. (2006). Hysteria Repeating Itself: Elizabeth Gaskell’s Lois the Witch’, Women’s Writing, 12(1), 85-97.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0969-9082en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09699080500200251en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/229211en
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThis article discusses Lois the witch, (Elizabeth Gaskell's fictional representation of the Salem witch trials) which was first published serially in Dickens's All The Year Round in 1859. This serialisation led to numerous conservative accounts in the periodical press of the role of the hysterical woman throughout history. In Lois, however, with its representation of mass hysteria, Gaskell refutes the widespread Victorian belief that hysteria is 'natural' for women - a symptom of their vulnerable bodies and minds.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis article was submitted to the RAE2008 for the University of Chester - English Language & Literature.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLois the witchen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesElizabeth Gaskellen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofserieshysteriaen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09699080500200251en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Women's Writingen_GB
dc.titleHysteria repeating itself: Elizabeth Gaskell's Lois the witchen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1747-5848en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College Chesteren_GB
dc.identifier.journalWomen's Writingen_GB
html.description.abstractThis article discusses Lois the witch, (Elizabeth Gaskell's fictional representation of the Salem witch trials) which was first published serially in Dickens's All The Year Round in 1859. This serialisation led to numerous conservative accounts in the periodical press of the role of the hysterical woman throughout history. In Lois, however, with its representation of mass hysteria, Gaskell refutes the widespread Victorian belief that hysteria is 'natural' for women - a symptom of their vulnerable bodies and minds.


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