Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMcCaddon, Andrew*
dc.contributor.authorHudson, Peter R.*
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Gareth K.*
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Alan*
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, John H. H.*
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Clare*
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T08:02:45Z
dc.date.available2012-05-29T08:02:45Z
dc.date.issued2001-09
dc.identifier.citationDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, 2001, 12(5), pp. 309-313
dc.identifier.issn1421-9824en
dc.identifier.issn1420-8008en
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000051275
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/226331
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.
dc.description.abstractSerum homocysteine is increased, and correlates inversely with cognitive scores, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia and "age-associated memory impairment". Elevated levels might signal accelerated cognitive decline, although this remains to be established. We therefore repeated Mini-Mental State Examinations, together with additional ADAS-Cog assessments, in 32 healthy elderly individuals to determine whether prior homocysteine levels predicted cognitive changes over a 5-year period.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis article was submitted to the RAE2008 for the University of Chester - Allied Health Professions and Studies.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherKarger
dc.relation.urlhttp://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produkte.asp?Aktion=JournalHome&ProduktNr=224226en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disordersen_GB
dc.subjecthomocysteineen_GB
dc.subjectcognitionen_GB
dc.subjectvitamin B12en_GB
dc.subjectfolateen_GB
dc.titleHomocysteine and cognitive decline in healthy elderlyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Wales College of Medicine ; Wrexham Maelor Hospital ; Wrexham Maelor Hospital ; Royal Alexandra Hospital, Paisley ; Chester College ; University of Wales College of Medicine
dc.identifier.journalDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disordersen_GB
html.description.abstractSerum homocysteine is increased, and correlates inversely with cognitive scores, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia and "age-associated memory impairment". Elevated levels might signal accelerated cognitive decline, although this remains to be established. We therefore repeated Mini-Mental State Examinations, together with additional ADAS-Cog assessments, in 32 healthy elderly individuals to determine whether prior homocysteine levels predicted cognitive changes over a 5-year period.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record