• Exploring the relationship between act variables and sleep disorders in predicting suicidal ideation

      Hochard, Kevin; Fanioudaki, Venetsiana (University of Chester, 2018)
      Suicidal Ideation (SI) is undoubtedly a major risk factor for suicide which is a fundamental public health phenomenon as every year in all regions of the world nearly one million individuals end their own lives. Sleep disorders, such as insomnia and nightmares are risk factors of SI and ACT has been shown to decrease SI. The study aimed to investigate the moderating role of ACT components (measured with the AAQ-II and CompACT) in the relationship between sleep disorders (insomnia and nightmares) and suicidal ideation. The study employed correlational quantitative analysis and conducted four hierarchical linear regressions. Findings from the e-survey (n= 274) showed that sleep disorders did not significantly predict SI beyond the effects of anxiety, stress and depression. However, ACT components decreased SI scores after controlling for depression, anxiety, stress, insomnia and nightmares (β = -.31, p < .001). In addition, ACT variables (measured with the AAQ-II) moderated the relationship between insomnia, but no nightmares, and SI by decreasing SI scores (β= -.09, p < .05). Taken together, these findings provide support for the protective role of psychological flexibility against SI and the effectiveness of ACT components in decreasing suicidal thoughts and behaviors in individuals with high scores of insomnia symptoms. The study suggests that an ACT based intervention could benefit individuals with insomnia from developing SI. Further evaluation of the relationship between sleep disorders and SI and possible mediators is warranted.