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dc.contributor.advisorBurek, Cynthia V.en
dc.contributor.authorJones, Ifan E.*
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-04T15:34:05Zen
dc.date.available2011-03-04T15:34:05Zen
dc.date.issued1999-11en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/123631en
dc.description.abstractTwo woodland SSSI Management Plans have been produced, conforming to the CCW guidelines for appropriate conservation management planning (CMS). The planning procedure has proven successful in its ability for enabling flexibility, where the different conservation interest of the two woodlands have enabled their national designations. Plan 1 identifies appropriate management objectives for Coed Afon Pumryd, which is nationally designated for its unique assemblage of ravine slime moulds, myxomycetes. This is an unusual plan as it not only identifies management objectives for the qualifying features of slime moulds, but also states management objectives for the woodland as a site feature. This is justified as the humid conditions provided by the woodland canopy is essential in providing the bryophytes host, and therefore, the slime mould assemblage in a favourable conservation status. Plan 2 adopts a standard approach to woodland, Coed Llechwedd, management planning. Management objectives are stated for each of the qualifying features, which are the woodland quality, assemblage of breeding birds and assemblage of invertebrates. The successful completion of management plans from the CMS format proves to be a very helpful tool for any site manager determine whether the features of a site are in a favourable conservation status. Targets and Limits of Acceptable Change are stated for each feature, from which the current status of each feature can be precisely indicated. Factors that may influence the features are also identified, and are also targeted and given Limits of Acceptable Change. One of the main benefits of the planning system is the continuity it provides between plans and managers. This ability could prove to be of great value in the huge task of producing the numerous Biodiversity Habitat and Species Action Plans. Indeed, much of the terminology used in these plans are derived from CMS. CMS has received much global acceptance, with plans implemented in areas of India and Costa Rica.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Liverpool (Chester College of Higher Education)en
dc.subjectconservationen
dc.subjectSnowdonia National Parken
dc.titleConservation management planning: Identification of appropriate management for two woodland SSSI, within the Snowdonia National Parken
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
html.description.abstractTwo woodland SSSI Management Plans have been produced, conforming to the CCW guidelines for appropriate conservation management planning (CMS). The planning procedure has proven successful in its ability for enabling flexibility, where the different conservation interest of the two woodlands have enabled their national designations. Plan 1 identifies appropriate management objectives for Coed Afon Pumryd, which is nationally designated for its unique assemblage of ravine slime moulds, myxomycetes. This is an unusual plan as it not only identifies management objectives for the qualifying features of slime moulds, but also states management objectives for the woodland as a site feature. This is justified as the humid conditions provided by the woodland canopy is essential in providing the bryophytes host, and therefore, the slime mould assemblage in a favourable conservation status. Plan 2 adopts a standard approach to woodland, Coed Llechwedd, management planning. Management objectives are stated for each of the qualifying features, which are the woodland quality, assemblage of breeding birds and assemblage of invertebrates. The successful completion of management plans from the CMS format proves to be a very helpful tool for any site manager determine whether the features of a site are in a favourable conservation status. Targets and Limits of Acceptable Change are stated for each feature, from which the current status of each feature can be precisely indicated. Factors that may influence the features are also identified, and are also targeted and given Limits of Acceptable Change. One of the main benefits of the planning system is the continuity it provides between plans and managers. This ability could prove to be of great value in the huge task of producing the numerous Biodiversity Habitat and Species Action Plans. Indeed, much of the terminology used in these plans are derived from CMS. CMS has received much global acceptance, with plans implemented in areas of India and Costa Rica.


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