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dc.contributor.authorMajor, David*
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-04T12:01:52Z
dc.date.available2011-02-04T12:01:52Z
dc.date.issued2002-11
dc.identifier.citationUnpublished conference presentation given at the Work Based Learning Network of the Universites' Association for Continuing Education annual conference at University of Wales Institute Cardiff, 27-28 November 2002.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/121254
dc.description.abstractThis paper seeks to examine some of the epistemological issues which relate to the debate concerning the justification of Work Based Learning in the HE curriculum. It will take account of post-modern perspectives on the theory of knowledge and of the so-called knowledge revolution and the impact these have had on the University. The perceived divide between academic and vocational knowledge, universal and local knowledge, and Mode 1 and Mode 2 knowledge will be discussed, and it will be argued that such ways of thinking are inappropriate and a hindrance in any attempt to arrive at a satisfactory way of understanding the place and status of knowledge in Work Based Learning. It will be argued that Work Based Learning is involved as much in knowledge creation as it is with the application of knowledge and, therefore, that more holistic ways of perceiving knowledge are required. The paper will continue to argue that a more helpful way of thinking of knowledge (especially when arguing the case for WBL in HE) is in terms of its level rather than its type, and it will conclude by commenting on Barnett’s concept of the practising epistemologist, and suggesting that this befits the profile of both the WBL facilitator and learner, before pointing to Raelin’s contention that Work Based Learning needs a new epistemology of practice.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://homepage.ntlworld.com/paul.ballard/james/UALL%20learning%20network/index.html
dc.subjectwork based learning
dc.subjectepistemology
dc.subjecthigher education
dc.titleThe place and status of knowledge in Work Based Learning
dc.typePresentation
dc.contributor.departmentChester College of Higher Educationen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T22:14:27Z
html.description.abstractThis paper seeks to examine some of the epistemological issues which relate to the debate concerning the justification of Work Based Learning in the HE curriculum. It will take account of post-modern perspectives on the theory of knowledge and of the so-called knowledge revolution and the impact these have had on the University. The perceived divide between academic and vocational knowledge, universal and local knowledge, and Mode 1 and Mode 2 knowledge will be discussed, and it will be argued that such ways of thinking are inappropriate and a hindrance in any attempt to arrive at a satisfactory way of understanding the place and status of knowledge in Work Based Learning. It will be argued that Work Based Learning is involved as much in knowledge creation as it is with the application of knowledge and, therefore, that more holistic ways of perceiving knowledge are required. The paper will continue to argue that a more helpful way of thinking of knowledge (especially when arguing the case for WBL in HE) is in terms of its level rather than its type, and it will conclude by commenting on Barnett’s concept of the practising epistemologist, and suggesting that this befits the profile of both the WBL facilitator and learner, before pointing to Raelin’s contention that Work Based Learning needs a new epistemology of practice.


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