• Dance Bands in Chester & North Wales, 1930 – 1970: Revealing a Hidden History

      Southall, Helen; University of Chester (2016-01-11)
      Dance bands in Chester and North Wales, 1930 - 1970 : Revealing a Hidden History “… the work of local amateur musicians is not just haphazard or formless, the result of individual whim or circumstance. On the contrary, a consistent - if sometimes changing - structure lies behind these surface activities. The public events … are part of an invisible but organised system through which individuals make their contribution to both the changes and the continuities of English music today.” (Finnegan, 2007) Chester (UK) in the period around World War II had a thriving live dance music scene, in which most of the music-making was done by local semi-professional musicians. Although they were busiest in the 1940s and 50s, many of the bands involved continued to operate alongside groups playing rock 'n' roll and pop, often in the same venues and sometimes at the same events, and the infrastructure which had supported the dance bands is an essential, if under-recorded, part of the history of rock 'n' roll and beat bands in the area (including the Beatles). This presentation looks at evidence from a recently-completed Ph.D. project to investigate how this local dance band scene worked, including the nature and evolution of its 'invisible but organised' underlying structure. The majority of the data was collected from private sources, with the aim of recording information which was not available in a single, academically-accessible archive. Fieldwork included over 30 recorded interviews with musicians, promoters and dancers. It also yielded more than 200 photographs and images which helped to illuminate the world of the bands, musicians and venues mentioned, and to produce a comprehensive snapshot of the local dance band scene, covering as wide a range as possible of social and musical backgrounds and experiences. Inspirations for this oral history project include The Hidden Musicians (Finnegan, 2007), Jazz Places (Becker, 2004), Rock Culture in Liverpool (Cohen, 1991), Other Voices (Brocken, 2010) and Victory Through Harmony (Baade, 2013). It is hoped that combining ideas from these and other sources with a detailed investigation of this specific local scene, as this work has done, will contribute further to a better understanding of amateur and semi-professional music-making in an urban landscape. Becker, Howard S. (2004). Jazz Places. In A. Bennett & R. A. Peterson (Eds.), Music Scenes: Local, Translocal and Virtual (pp. 17 - 27): Vanderbilt University Press. Brocken, Michael. (2010). Other voices : hidden histories of Liverpool's popular music scenes, 1930s - 1970s: Ashgate Publishing Ltd. Cohen, Sara. (1991). Rock Culture in Liverpool : Popular Music in the Making: Oxford University Press. Finnegan, Ruth H. . (2007). The Hidden Musicians: Music-Making in an English Town: Wesleyan University Press.
    • Dance bands in Chester (1930 - 1970) : An evolving professional network

      Southall, Helen; University of Chester (2011-09)
      Headings are: the city of Chester; a hidden history; jazz places; economic places; social networks; methodology and findings.
    • Data aggregation in wireless sensor networks with minimum delay and minimum use of energy: A comparative study

      Qayyum, Bushra; Saeed, Mohammed; Roberts, Jason A.; University of Chester ; Al Khawarizmi University College ; University of Chester (British Computer Society, 2015)
      The prime objective of deploying large- scale wireless sensor networks is to collect information from to control systems associated with these networks. Wireless sensor networks are widely used in application domains such as security and inspection, environmental monitoring, warfare, and other situations especially where immediate responses are required such as disasters and medical emergency. Whenever there is a growth there are challenges and to cope with these challenges strategies and solutions must be developed. This paper discusses the recently addressed issues of data aggregation through presenting a comparative study of different research work done on minimizing delay in different structures of wireless sensor networks. Finally we introduce our proposed method to minimize both delay and power consumption using a tree based clustering scheme with partial data aggregation.
    • Dead-zone logic in autonomic systems

      Eze, Thaddeus; Anthony, Richard; University of Chester and University of Greenwich (IEEE, 2014-07)
      Dead-Zone logic is a mechanism to prevent autonomic managers from unnecessary, inefficient and ineffective control brevity when the system is sufficiently close to its target state. It provides a natural and powerful framework for achieving dependable self-management in autonomic systems by enabling autonomic managers to smartly carry out a change (or adapt) only when it is safe and efficient to do so-within a particular (defined) safety margin. This paper explores and evaluates the performance impact of dead-zone logic in trustworthy autonomic computing. Using two case example scenarios, we present empirical analyses that demonstrate the effectiveness of dead-zone logic in achieving stability, dependability and trustworthiness in adaptive systems. Dynamic temperature target tracking and autonomic datacentre resource request and allocation management scenarios are used. Results show that dead-zone logic can significantly enhance the trustability of autonomic systems.
    • Developing critical insights into artificial intelligence

      Kerins, John (Higher Education Academy, 2005-10)
      This article discusses how to gain insights into artifical intelligence through introducing context, theory, and relevant practical tasks that allow students to gain a deeper understanding into some of the scientific and engineering goals of artifical intelligence.
    • Device to accurately place Epidural Tuohy needle for Anesthesia Administration

      Vaughan, Neil; Dubey, Venketesh N.; Wee, Michael Y. K.; Isaacs, Richard; Bournemouth University; Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (Copernicus Publications, 2014-01-02)
      The aim of this project is to design two sterile devices for epidural needle insertion which can measure in real time (i) the depth of needle tip during insertion and (ii) interspinous pressure changes through a pressure measurement device as the epidural needle is advanced through the tissue layers. The length measurement device uses a small wireless camera with video processing computer algorithms which can detect and measure the moving needle. The pressure measurement device uses entirely sterile componenets including a pressure transducer to accurately measure syringe saline in mm Hg. The data from these two devices accurately describe a needle insertion allowing comparison or review of insertions. The data was then cross-referenced to pre-measured data from MRI or ultrasound scan to identify how ligemant thickness correlates to our measured depth and pressure data. The developed devices have been tested on a porcine specimen during insertions performed by experienced anaesthetists. We have obtained epidural pressures for each ligament and demonstrated functionality of our devices to measure pressure and depth of epidural needle during insertion. This has not previously been possible to monitor in real-time. The benefits of these devices are (i) to provide an alternative method to identify correct needle placement during the procedure on real patients. (ii) The data describing the speed, depth and pressure during insertion can be used to configure an epidural simulator, simulating the needle insertion procedure. (iii) Our pressure and depth data can be compared to pre-measured MRI and ultrasound to identify previously unknown links between epidural pressure and depth with BMI, obesity and body shapes.
    • Double-diffusive natural convection in a differentially heated wavy cavity under thermophoresis effect

      Grosan, Teodor; Sheremet, Mikhail A.; Pop, Ioan; Pop, Serban R.; Babes-Bolyai University; Tomsk State University; University of Chester (American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2018-02-28)
      A numerical analysis is made for thermophoretic transport of small particles through the convection in a differentially heated square cavity with a wavy wall. The governing gas-particle partial differential equations are solved numerically for some values of the considered parameters to investigate their influence on the flow, heat, and mass transfer patterns. It is found that the effect of thermophoresis can be quite significant in appropriate situations. The number of undualtions can essentially modify the heat transfer rate and fluid flow intensity.
    • Efficacy of a virtual environment for training ball passing skills in rugby

      Miles, Helen C.; Pop, Serban R.; Watt, Simon J.; Lawrence, Gavin P.; John, Nigel W.; Perrot, Vincent; Mallet, Pierre; Mestre, Daniel R.; Morgan, Kenton (Springer, 2014-07-14)
      We have designed a configurable virtual environment to train rugby ball passing skills. Seeking to validate the system’s ability to correctly aid training, two experiments were performed. Ten participants took part in ball passing activities, which were used to compare the combinations of different user positions relative to the physical screen, the use of stereoscopic presentation and the use of a floor screen to extend the field of view of the virtual scene. Conversely to what was expected, the results indicate that the participants did not respond well to simulated target distances, and only the users physical distance from the screen had an effect on the distance thrown.
    • Evaluating current practice and proposing a system to enhance knowledge assets within a small software development unit

      Fannoun, Sufian; Kerins, John; The University of Chester (IEEE, 2018-06-25)
      Knowledge management and knowledge transfer within organisations challenge continuity and resilience in the face of changing environments. While issues are principally addressed within large organisations, there is scope to evaluate how knowledge assets are managed within small and medium enterprises and to consider how the process might be enhanced. The research reported here aimed to evaluate practice within an evolving software development unit to understand how knowledge has been acquired and utilised to further organisational development. In-depth interviews were carried out with members of the unit to elicit an understanding of individual and collective learning. Qualitative analysis of the data revealed key changes in thinking and practice as well as insight into the development of individuals' contextual knowledge and tacit understanding. This analysis led to the proposal of a bespoke, lightweight web-based system to support knowledge capture and organisational learning. This work is still in progress but it is anticipated that the results will provide a potentially novel and beneficial method for enhancing knowledge assets in small enterprises and consolidating valuable, and potentially scarce, expertise.
    • Evolution of Neural Networks for Physically Simulated Evolved Virtual Quadruped Creatures

      Vaughan, Neil; Royal Academy of Engineering; University of Chester (Springer-Verlag, 2018-07-07)
      This work develops evolved virtual creatures (EVCs) using neuroevolution as the controller for movement and decisions within a 3D physics simulated environ-ment. Previous work on EVCs has displayed various behaviour such as following a light source. This work is focused on complexifying the range of behaviours available to EVCs. This work uses neuroevolution for learning specific actions combined with other controllers for making higher level decisions about which action to take in a given scenario. Results include analysis of performance of the EVCs in simulated physics environment. Various controllers are compared including a hard coded benchmark, a fixed topology feed forward artificial neural network and an evolving ANN subjected to neuroevolution by applying mutations in both topology and weights. The findings showed that both fixed topology ANNs and neuroevolution did successfully control the evolved virtual creatures in the distance travelling task.
    • Evolutionary Robot Swarm Cooperative Retrieval

      Vaughan, Neil; Royal Academy of Engineering; University of Chester (Springer, 2018-07-07)
      In nature bees and leaf-cutter ants communicate to improve cooperation during food retrieval. This research aims to model communication in a swarm of auton-omous robots. When food is identified robot communication is emitted within a limited range. Other robots within the range receive the communication and learn of the location and size of the food source. The simulation revealed that commu-nication improved the rate of cooperative food retrieval tasks. However a counter-productive chain reaction can occur when robots repeat communications from other robots causing cooperation errors. This can lead to a large number of robots travelling towards the same food source at the same time. The food becomes de-pleted, before some robots have arrived. Several robots continue to communicate food presence, before arriving at the food source to find it gone. Nature-inspired communication can enhance swarm behaviour without requiring a central control-ler and may be useful in autonomous drones or vehicles.
    • Haptic feedback from human tissues of various stiffness and homogeneity.

      Vaughan, Neil; Dubey, Venketesh N.; Wee, Michael Y. K.; Isaacs, Richard; Bournemouth University; Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (Techno-Press, 2014-07-01)
      This work presents methods for haptic modelling of soft and hard tissue with varying stiffness. The model provides visualization of deformation and calculates force feedback during simulated epidural needle insertion. A spring-mass-damper (SMD) network is configured from magnetic resonance image (MRI) slices of patient’s lumbar region to represent varying stiffness throughout tissue structure. Reaction force is calculated from the SMD network and a haptic device is configured to produce a needle insertion simulation. The user can feel the changing forces as the needle is inserted through tissue layers and ligaments. Methods for calculating the force feedback at various depths of needle insertion are presented. Voxelization is used to fill ligament surface meshes with spring mass damper assemblies for simulated needle insertion into soft and hard tissues. Modelled vertebrae cannot be pierced by the needle. Graphs were produced during simulated needle insertions to compare the applied force to haptic reaction force. Preliminary saline pressure measurements during Tuohy epidural needle insertion are also used as a basis for forces generated in the simulation.
    • How effective is Ant Colony Optimisation at Robot Path Planning

      Wolfenden, A.; Vaughan, Neil; University of Chester (The Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and Simulation for Behaviour (AISB), 2018-04-06)
      This project involves investigation of the problem robot path planning using ant colony optimisation heuristics to construct the quickest path from the starting point to the end. The project has developed a simulation that successfully simulates as well as demonstrates visually through a graphical user interface, robot path planning using ant colony optimisation. The simulation shows an ability to traverse an unknown environment from a start point to an end and successfully construct a route for others to follow both when the terrain is dynamic and static
    • The Implementation and Validation of a Virtual Environment for Training Powered Wheelchair Manoeuvres

      John, Nigel W.; Pop, Serban R.; Day, Thomas; Ritsos, Panagiotis D.; Headleand, Christopher J.; University of Chester; Bangor University; University of Lincoln (IEEE, 2017-05-02)
      Navigating a powered wheelchair and avoiding collisions is often a daunting task for new wheelchair users. It takes time and practice to gain the coordination needed to become a competent driver and this can be even more of a challenge for someone with a disability. We present a cost-effective virtual reality (VR) application that takes advantage of consumer level VR hardware. The system can be easily deployed in an assessment centre or for home use, and does not depend on a specialized high-end virtual environment such as a Powerwall or CAVE. This paper reviews previous work that has used virtual environments technology for training tasks, particularly wheelchair simulation. We then describe the implementation of our own system and the first validation study carried out using thirty three able bodied volunteers. The study results indicate that at a significance level of 5% then there is an improvement in driving skills from the use of our VR system. We thus have the potential to develop the competency of a wheelchair user whilst avoiding the risks inherent to training in the real world. However, the occurrence of cybersickness is a particular problem in this application that will need to be addressed.
    • An Information-Theoretic Approach to the Cost-benefit Analysis of Visualization in Virtual Environments

      Chen, Min; Gaither, Kelly; John, Nigel; McCann, Brian; University of Oxford; University of Texas at Austin; University of Chester (IEEE, 2018-08-20)
      Visualization and virtual environments (VEs) have been two interconnected parallel strands in visual computing for decades. Some VEs have been purposely developed for visualization applications, while many visualization applications are exemplary showcases in general-purpose VEs. Because of the development and operation costs of VEs, the majority of visualization applications in practice have yet to benefit from the capacity of VEs. In this paper, we examine this status quo from an information-theoretic perspective. Our objectives are to conduct cost-benefit analysis on typical VE systems (including augmented and mixed reality, theatre-based systems, and large powerwalls), to explain why some visualization applications benefit more from VEs than others, and to sketch out pathways for the future development of visualization applications in VEs. We support our theoretical propositions and analysis using theories and discoveries in the literature of cognitive sciences and the practical evidence reported in the literatures of visualization and VEs.
    • Interventional radiology virtual simulator for liver biopsy

      Villard, Pierre-Frédéric; Vidal, Franck P.; ap Cenydd, Llyr; Holbrey, Richard; Pisharody, S.; Johnson, Sheena; Bulpitt, Andy; John, Nigel W.; Bello, Fernando; Gould, Daniel (Springer, 2013-07-24)
      Training in Interventional Radiology currently uses the apprenticeship model, where clinical and technical skills of invasive procedures are learnt during practice in patients. This apprenticeship training method is increasingly limited by regulatory restrictions on working hours, concerns over patient risk through trainees' inexperience and the variable exposure to case mix and emergencies during training. To address this, we have developed a computer-based simulation of visceral needle puncture procedures. Methods A real-time framework has been built that includes: segmentation, physically based modelling, haptics rendering, pseudo-ultrasound generation and the concept of a physical mannequin. It is the result of a close collaboration between different universities, involving computer scientists, clinicians, clinical engineers and occupational psychologists. Results The technical implementation of the framework is a robust and real-time simulation environment combining a physical platform and an immersive computerized virtual environment. The face, content and construct validation have been previously assessed, showing the reliability and effectiveness of this framework, as well as its potential for teaching visceral needle puncture. Conclusion A simulator for ultrasound-guided liver biopsy has been developed. It includes functionalities and metrics extracted from cognitive task analysis. This framework can be useful during training, particularly given the known difficulties in gaining significant practice of core skills in patients.
    • Island Coalescence during Film Growth: An Underestimated Limitation of Cu ALD

      Hagen, Dirk J.; Connolly, James; Povey, Ian M.; Rushworth, Simon; Pemble, Martyn E. (Wiley, 2017-05-31)
    • Jazz on the border: Jazz and dance bands in Chester and North Wales in mid-twentieth century

      Southall, Helen; University of Chester (Equinox, 2013)
      There was a high degree of overlap between western popular music and jazz in the mid- twentieth century. However, histories of jazz and histories of popular music are often puzzlingly separate, as if divided by strict borders. This article looks at some of the rea- sons for this (including those proposed by Frith (2007) and Bennett (2013). The impor- tance of musical pathways and hidden histories (Becker 2002, 2004; Finnegan 2007; Nott 2002; Rogers 2013) in the context of local music scenes is considered. The importance of taking live music scenes and provincial areas into account when discussing genre his- tories is discussed, in the context of examples from an oral history study of dance-band musicians and promoters in the Chester (UK) area. These examples help to demonstrate that boundaries between jazz and popular music are frequently less abrupt in practice than they are in theory.
    • Learning to combine multiple string similarity metrics for effective toponym matching

      Santos, Rui; orcid: 0000-0001-5981-9924; Murrieta-Flores, Patricia; orcid: 0000-0001-9904-0288; Martins, Bruno; orcid: 0000-0002-3856-2936 (Informa UK Limited, 2017-09-06)
    • LiTu - A Human-Computer Interface based on Frustrated Internal Reflection of Light

      Edwards, Marc R.; John, Nigel W.; University of Chester (IEEE Conference Publications, 2015-10)
      We have designed LiTu (Laɪ’Tu - Light Tube) as a customisable and low-cost (ca 30 Euros) human-computer interface. It is composed of an acrylic tube, a ball-bearing mirror, six LEDs and a webcam. Touching the tube causes frustrated internal reflection of light due to a change in the critical angle at the acrylic-skin boundary. Scattered light within the tube is reflected off the mirror into the camera at the opposite end for image processing. Illuminated contact regions in the video frames are segmented and processed to generate 2D information such as: pitch and volume, or x and y coordinates of a graphic. We demonstrate the functionality of LiTu both as a musical instrument and as an interactive computer graphics controller. For example, various musical notes can be generated by touching specific regions around the surface of the tube. Volume can be controlled by sliding a finger down the tube and pitch by sliding the finger radially. We demonstrate the adaptable nature of LiTu’s touch interface and discuss our plans to explore future physical modifications of the device.