• Exercise dependence in bodybuilders: Antecedents and reliability of measurement

      Smith, Dave; Hale, Bruce; University College Chester/University of Liverpool ; Penn State University (Edizioni Minerva, 2005-09)
      This article discusses a study which aimed to examine social and psychological antecedents of bodybuilding dependence (life satisfaction, socio-economic status, marital status and parental status) and examine the test-retest reliability of the Bodybuilding Dependence Scale (BDS). One hundred and eighty-one male bodybuilders agreed to participate in the study.
    • "Read with caution": A reply to Pickett et al

      Smith, Dave; Wright, Caroline J.; Bruce-Low, Stewart; Hale, Bruce; University College Chester ; University College Chester ; University College Chester ; Penn State University (British Association of Sport and Medicine, 2005-10-21)
      This article critiques a study by Pickett Lewis & Cash titled "Men, muscles, and body image: comparisons of competitive bodybuilders, weigh trainers, and athletically active controls" published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine in 2005.
    • Validity and factor structure of the bodybuilding dependence scale

      Smith, Dave; Hale, Bruce; University College Chester ; University of Maine (BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & British Association of Sport and Exercise Medicine, 2004-04)
      Objectives: To investigate the factor structure, validity, and reliability of the bodybuilding dependence scale and to investigate differences in bodybuilding dependence between men and women and competitive and non-competitive bodybuilders. Methods: Seventy two male competitive bodybuilders, 63 female competitive bodybuilders, 87 male non-competitive bodybuilders, and 63 non-competitive female bodybuilders completed the bodybuilding dependence scale (BDS), the exercise dependence questionnaire (EDQ), and the muscle dysmorphia inventory (MDI). Results: Confirmatory factor analysis of the BDS supported a three factor model of bodybuilding dependence, consisting of social dependence, training dependence, and mastery dependence (Q = 3.16, CFI = 0.98, SRMR = 0.04). Internal reliability of all three subscales was high (Cronbach’s = 0.92, 0.92, and 0.93 respectively). Significant (p<0.001) and moderate correlations were found between all BDS and MDI subscales, and between five of the eight EDQ subscales. A multivariate analysis of covariance, with univariate F tests and Tukey HSD tests, revealed that both male and female competitive bodybuilders scored significantly (p<0.05) higher on all three BDS subscales than the male and female non-competitive bodybuilders. However, there were no significant sex differences on any of the BDS subscales (p>0.05). Conclusion: The three factor BDS appears to be a reliable and valid measure of bodybuilding dependence. Symptoms of bodybuilding dependence are more prevalent in competitive bodybuilders than non-competitive ones, but there are no significant sex differences in bodybuilding dependence.