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dc.contributor.advisorWalker, Marken
dc.contributor.authorBattye, Lisa*
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-27T14:18:44Z
dc.date.available2010-08-27T14:18:44Z
dc.date.issued1999-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/110419
dc.description.abstractCare in Trinity answers the question, "What makes care pastoral?" It tests the hypothesis that the doctrine of the Trinity can be applied to the question in such a way that a paradigm for pastoral care emerges. The context for the study was the author's need for a working model for her own practice when ordained. It therefore employs a postmodern epistemology. It proceeds by correlating the results of a literature search in three areas and basing its conclusions on the result. The areas examined are The Trinity, contemporary anthropology and pastoral care. All are found to be inherently relational. Their shared relationality is taken to support the claims that human relationships may be patterned on divine relationships, and that (Christian) pastoral care should display the core features of Trinitarian life. Three core features of Trinitarian life are then ascertained by examining the features of a diagrammatic representation of Trinity that has been adopted in the course of the argument. When translated into the language of human behaviour these are Encounter Empathy and Empowerment. 'By-products' of the research process include critique of the use of gendered language for God and of an immanent-transcendent dualism. It is also recommended that the category 'being for' should be added to 'being' and 'doing' when describing pastoral conduct, and that all three parameters in the new pastoral care paradigm will ideally be present in a balanced form.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Liverpool (Chester College of Higher Education)en
dc.subjectTrinityen
dc.subjectpastoral careen
dc.titleCare in Trinity: A paradigm for pastoral careen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMThen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T17:27:47Z
html.description.abstractCare in Trinity answers the question, "What makes care pastoral?" It tests the hypothesis that the doctrine of the Trinity can be applied to the question in such a way that a paradigm for pastoral care emerges. The context for the study was the author's need for a working model for her own practice when ordained. It therefore employs a postmodern epistemology. It proceeds by correlating the results of a literature search in three areas and basing its conclusions on the result. The areas examined are The Trinity, contemporary anthropology and pastoral care. All are found to be inherently relational. Their shared relationality is taken to support the claims that human relationships may be patterned on divine relationships, and that (Christian) pastoral care should display the core features of Trinitarian life. Three core features of Trinitarian life are then ascertained by examining the features of a diagrammatic representation of Trinity that has been adopted in the course of the argument. When translated into the language of human behaviour these are Encounter Empathy and Empowerment. 'By-products' of the research process include critique of the use of gendered language for God and of an immanent-transcendent dualism. It is also recommended that the category 'being for' should be added to 'being' and 'doing' when describing pastoral conduct, and that all three parameters in the new pastoral care paradigm will ideally be present in a balanced form.


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