• Michael’s Story :Developing Understandings of Gypsy Traveller culture

      Owens, Allan; Pickford, Barbara; Pickford, Tony; University of Chester, University of Chester, University of Chester (Chester Academic Press., 2014-02-03)
      Practise based research in 8 schools over a three year period led to the creation of this CDROM and DVD Video. Process drama was used to develop knowledge and understanding of Gypsy Traveller Culture and Lifestyle.
    • Dissolving into Scotland: National Identity in Dunsinane and The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart.

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2016-03-03)
      Journal article
    • The Arrival of Godot: Beckett, Cultural Memory and 1950s British Theatre

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Bloomsbury Methuen, 2016-06-30)
      Book chapter
    • Before and After Eno: Situating ‘The Recording Studio as Compositional Tool

      Albiez, Sean; Dockwray, Ruth; Southampton Solent University; University of Chester (Bloomsbury, 2016-08-11)
      This chapter discusses Eno's work and lecture - Studio as a Compositional Tool. As previous studies have identified the importance of John Cage and post-Cageian experimental music for Eno, this study extends the flows of influence and counter-influence back to the second decade of the twentieth century, and situates Eno's Studio as a Compositional Tool lecture in the long history of twentieth century avant-garde and modernist debates concerning the future of music and the potential recording technologies afford. Therefore, the fundamental purpose of this study is to contextualise and situate the lecture in a way that has not been attempted previously. This will allow a broader understanding of ‘The Recording Studio as Compositional Tool’ as a dialogic, heteroglossic text that is in conversation with and channels the voices of others who, in the previous seven decades, had already considered and formulated responses to issues that Eno addressed at the end of the 1970s.
    • A Symphony of Sound: Surround Sound in Formula One Racing Games

      Dockwray, Ruth; Collins, Karen; University of Chester; University of Waterloo (Bloomsbury, 2015-01-29)
      The chapter explores the role of sound on Formula One gaming experience, with particular reference to cine-realism and aspects of sound design.
    • Drive, Speed and Narrative in the Soundscapes of Racing Games

      Collins, Karen; Dockwray, Ruth; University of Waterloo; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-05-31)
      This chapter argues that racing games are situated in a space between reality and fantasy: a cinematic realism, or “cine-real". At the heart of the auditory cine-realism is a use of sound and music to both fill a gap left by the lack of sensory information presented to the player, and as part of a narrative device. The authors also argue that the narrative use of music and sound in racing games is one of the key features that distinguishes racing games from straight simulations.
    • Sonic Proxemics and the Art of Persuasion: An Analytical Framework

      Collins, Karen; Dockwray, Ruth; University of Waterloo; University of Chester (MIT Press, 2015-12-07)
      This paper introduces a framework for the creation and analysis of sonic spatialization and proxemics in audiovisual media. The authors apply the framework to three public service announcements to show how sonic proxemics can be used as a rhetorical device that may be used to strengthen political aims.
    • The Events: Immanence and the Audience

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (de Gruyter, 2016-05-12)
      David Greig’s The Events (2013) stages the aftermath of a traumatic event; a cleric tries to come to terms with the massacre of her multicultural choir. The play uses two actors (one playing the cleric, and the other playing all the other main roles, including that of the killer). The cast, however, also includes a choir, drawn from the town where the show is being performed: the choir sings, and takes on small speaking roles (reading their lines from the script). They also serve as an audience for the action, occupying tiered seating at the back of the stage. The choir serves as a powerful reminder of what Laura Cull, in Theatres of Immanence: Deleuze and the Ethics of Performance (2012) identifies as Deleuzian immanence: a performance which stages “the participation, multiplication and extension of the human body – understood as that which is produced by relations of force and encounters with the affects of other bodies” (10). In this article, I argue that the strong affect generated by the play in performance stems mainly from the positioning of the choir, the performers and the audience as, simultaneously, participants and witnesses to trauma; and from the immanent relation of actors, choir and audience within the structure of the performance event.
    • The Bogus Men: Eno, Ferry and Roxy Music

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Continuum, 2016-08-11)
      Book chapter.
    • Taking the Studio by Strategy

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Continuum, 2016-08-11)
      Book chapter
    • Stone Tapes: Ghost Box, Nostalgia and Postwar Britain

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2016-03-10)
      Book Chapter
    • Translating and Understanding: pre-text based drama

      Owens, Allan; University of Chester (Draamatayo, 2015-01)
      Pre-text based process drama operates in part through a process characterised by the notion of good friction. This chapter is used to suggest that this process is more concerned with concepts of translation and understanding than explaining away or meaning making.
    • Touching the ineffable: Collective creative collaboration, education and the secular-spiritual in performing arts

      Jamieson, Evelyn; University of Chester (Intellect Ltd., 2014-06-01)
      This article considers a range of spiritual, psychological and pedagogical writing to examine whether the contemporary notion of ‘secular-spirituality’ can move forward our understanding of collaborative working processes in the performing arts. With reference to Anttila, Bigger, Bini, Czikszentmihalyi, Lave and Wenger, James, Roff, and Van Ness, the article focuses on the rehearsal room interplay of life world and social world through three key notions. These are ‘embodied knowing’, ‘bodily intelligence’ and ‘belonging’ in relation to the individual in the wider collaborative process. Some working practices of Forced Entertainment – as discussed by Tim Etchells – are then considered as a concluding and practice-based referent.
    • Sensible Sensitivity: Arts Pedagogy in Management Development

      Passila, A.; Owens, Allan; Lapeenranta University of Technology; University of Chester (Kogan Page, 2016-03-03)
      This chapter introduces the distinctive forms of practice and discourse that arts pedagogy can offer when applied in management development and education.
    • Creativity and Democracy in Education: Practices and politics of learning through the arts

      Adams, Jeff; Owens, Allan; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-07-16)
      With particular reference to the practices and politics of learning through the arts this book (Research Monograph) forms part of the Routledge Research in Education Policy and Politics series aims to enhance our understanding of key challenges and facilitate on-going academic debate within the influential and growing field of Education Policy and Politics.
    • Learning Jam: an evaluation of the use of Arts Based Initiatives to generate polyphonic understanding in Work Based Learning

      Passila, A.; Owens, Allan; Pulkki, Maiju; Lapeenranta University of Technology; University of Chester; Aalto University (Emerald, 2016-05-09)
      The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise ‘Learning Jam’ as a way of organising space, time and people through arts based pedagogies in work based learning. This form of encounter originated in Finland to challenge functional silo mentality by prioritising polyphony. Through the use of a 'kaleidoscopic pedagogy', Arts-Based Initiatives (ABIs) are used to collectively and subjectively reconsider practice. The research design is grounded in one of a series of Learning Jams co-created by practitioners from the field of arts and arts-based consultancy and academics from the field of arts, arts education, innovation and management, learning and development. The focus was on exploring the value of each participants work based learning practice through the lens of an Arts Value Matrix. Rancière´s critical theory was used to frame the exploration. The research questions asked; what are the ingredients of this creative, transformative learning space and in what ways can the polyphonic understandings that emerge in it impact on Work-Based Learning? Findings of this study centre around alternative ways of being in a learning setting where we do not defer to the conventional figures of authority, but collectively explore ways of organising, where the main idea is to lean on something-which-is-not-yet. A key research implication is that teaching in this context demands reflexive and dialogical capabilities for those who hold the role of organizing and facilitating spaces for learning and transformation. The main limitation is in stopping short of fully articulating detailed aspects of these capabilities. The originality and value of the practice of Learning Jam is that managers and artists explore the potential of operating as partners to develop new ways of working to realise organisational change and innovation.
    • Fishing in Puddles, Place and Space in Performance Research

      Piasecka, Shelley; University of Chester (Wiley & Sons, 2014-07-21)
      This article examines the significance of place and space from a Performance Studies and Social Studies perspective. In terms of the social sciences, I draw upon the formal, symbolic and marginal articulation of place. Hetherington suggests that certain places act as focal point for the establishment of social identities, citing city-centre landmarks and shopping malls. Similarly, children attach all kinds of values to the formal spaces they occupy. As one example of this point, I examine the child’s relationship to the school hall. From the perspective of performance, I examine a project undertaken at a junior school in Stoke-on-Trent, inspired by the site work of Wrights & Sites. As a critical lens, I adopt Boal’s understanding of the oneiric dimension. The oneiric dimension is particularly relevant in performance work as these are the moments when we (as performers and spectators) are pulled into the action. In these instances, the physical space simply disappears, imagination replaces actuality and the desire to believe outweighs the reality of the present.
    • A motivation to move: Juxtaposing the embodied practices of Pina Bausch and Ingemar Lindh

      Bugeja, Nicola; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-03-26)
      In their summer newsletter of 1996, the Centre for Performance Research (CPR) announced a workshop retreat to be led by Swedish theatre practitioner Ingemar Lindh at Druidstone in West Wales. The workshop, which was supposed to run in July of 1997, did not happen due to Lindh’s untimely death in Malta a few days before. The announcement described Lindh’s work as ‘oscillating between sensuality, even eroticism, on the one hand, and a kind of choreography of everyday life, similar sometimes to the work of Pina Bausch, on the other’ (CPR 1996, p. 9). Taking the CPR comparison as its cue, this article investigates an overlapping concern between the tanztheater practice of Bausch and the laboratory theatre work of Lindh: that whether called ‘movement’ or ‘action’, a performer’s work needs to be motivated by one’s personal input (memories, thoughts, images, and other mental processes) rather than executed as an estranged and dictated vocabulary of movement. This premise was largely a result of two major influential figures in Bausch’s and Lindh’s careers: Rudolph von Laban and Étienne Decroux. The article starts with a concise contextualisation of a reaction to rigid methodology in both tanztheater and laboratory theatre, i.e. Bausch’s and Lindh’s backgrounds respectively. It then juxtaposes Laban’s and Decroux’s reflections on embodied practice, leading the way to a discussion of the matter in the practices of Bausch and Lindh. To achieve broader understanding, the juxtaposition is supported by a close reading of Rick Kemp’s (2012) and Erika Fischer-Lichte’s (2008) accounts of ‘embodied mind’.
    • Total war and its effects on the live music industry in Cheshire and North Wales

      Southall, Helen; University of Chester (University of Chester, 2014-10-03)
      Given the profound effect which World War II had on the economy of the UK as a whole, it would be surprising if specific areas of that economy – such as live music in the provinces – were not affected as well. How did ‘total war’ affect the live music industry on a local level? Evidence I have collected for a study of musicians active in and around Chester during the period suggests that the large number of military bases in the area, combined with the effects of other wartime factors such as conscription, rationing and the need to maintain both military and civilian morale, did indeed affect the size and nature of the market for live dance music locally. For instance, the large US Air Force base at Burtonwood was a source of work for local musicians, as well as an opportunity to mix with American musicians and music fans. As well as presenting information obtained through interviews with musicians and their relatives, I will also look briefly at what happened to the musicians and the bands after the war, when economic and social conditions changed again, at the same time as advances occurred in music-related technology.
    • Throwing sheep in the bandroom: Visualising a social and economic network of musicians in Cheshire and North Wales

      Southall, Helen; University of Chester (2012-07-25)
      The aim of this session is to apply some of the visual and technological tools of 21st-Century online social networking, e.g. network visualisation using "friend wheels", to a densely interconnected network of jazz and dance band musicians active in the Chester (UK) area in the 1950s, as revealed by research on the "hidden history" of live music in the area. Over 30 interviews with musicians, dancers and promoters have been collected, plus more than 200 photographs from personal collections, and an M.U. diary/address book belonging to local bandleader Wilf Field. The recent dramatic growth of online social networks such as Facebook, LinkedIn and MySpace has led to a revival of interest in the economic importance of social networks; Fraser and Dutta’s "Throwing Sheep in the Boardroom" provides an interesting survey of the issues, and was an inspiration for this session. But working musicians have long known the importance of knowing (and impressing) the "right people" in order to get work. Have social networks changed fundamentally since the advent of Web 2.0, or were they always there, and just a little harder to visualise when held in a pocket diary, rather than displayed on a Facebook wall?