• Taking the Studio by Strategy

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Continuum, 2016-08-11)
      Book chapter
    • Tamaglitchi

      Collins, Karen; Dockwray, Ruth (ACM Press, 2018)
    • The Arrival of Godot: Beckett, Cultural Memory and 1950s British Theatre

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Bloomsbury Methuen, 2016-06-30)
      Book chapter
    • The artificial body: Speaking through stammers and silences

      Smith, Kate M. (Chester College, 1996)
      This article, originally delivered at the Body memory in performance conference at Lancaster University in August 1995, discusses some of the observed phenomena in rehearsal processes towards the performance of the damaged and dismembered bodies that inhabit Caryl Churchill and David Lan's A mouthful of birds (Methuen, 1986) and Timberlake Wertenbaker's The love of the nightgale (Faber & Faber, 1989).
    • The Bogus Men: Eno, Ferry and Roxy Music

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Continuum, 2016-08-11)
      Book chapter.
    • The Events: Immanence and the Audience

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (de Gruyter, 2016-05-12)
      David Greig’s The Events (2013) stages the aftermath of a traumatic event; a cleric tries to come to terms with the massacre of her multicultural choir. The play uses two actors (one playing the cleric, and the other playing all the other main roles, including that of the killer). The cast, however, also includes a choir, drawn from the town where the show is being performed: the choir sings, and takes on small speaking roles (reading their lines from the script). They also serve as an audience for the action, occupying tiered seating at the back of the stage. The choir serves as a powerful reminder of what Laura Cull, in Theatres of Immanence: Deleuze and the Ethics of Performance (2012) identifies as Deleuzian immanence: a performance which stages “the participation, multiplication and extension of the human body – understood as that which is produced by relations of force and encounters with the affects of other bodies” (10). In this article, I argue that the strong affect generated by the play in performance stems mainly from the positioning of the choir, the performers and the audience as, simultaneously, participants and witnesses to trauma; and from the immanent relation of actors, choir and audience within the structure of the performance event.
    • Through the lens of Kaleidoscopic Pedagogy- collective imagining of democratic forms of being.

      Passila, A.; Owens, Allan; LUT University (Lahti- Lappeenranta) (Xamk, 2018-11-08)
      This chapter focuses on Kaleidoscopic Pedagogy as a conceptual frame of arts based method applied to a discussion and collective imagining of democratic forms of being with young people, artists, art pedagogues and researchers. The background of KP is a problem identified by one of the founding theorist of critical pedagogy Henry A. Giroux (2014a), which is that democracy has been sullied as a concept – as a ´service` - and no longer offers the promise of emancipation (Giroux, 2014b). The discussion, therefore, is about understandings of democracy: what it might look like and how it would feel to be in it according to young people themselves.
    • Throwing sheep in the bandroom: Visualising a social and economic network of musicians in Cheshire and North Wales

      Southall, Helen; University of Chester (2012-07-25)
      The aim of this session is to apply some of the visual and technological tools of 21st-Century online social networking, e.g. network visualisation using "friend wheels", to a densely interconnected network of jazz and dance band musicians active in the Chester (UK) area in the 1950s, as revealed by research on the "hidden history" of live music in the area. Over 30 interviews with musicians, dancers and promoters have been collected, plus more than 200 photographs from personal collections, and an M.U. diary/address book belonging to local bandleader Wilf Field. The recent dramatic growth of online social networks such as Facebook, LinkedIn and MySpace has led to a revival of interest in the economic importance of social networks; Fraser and Dutta’s "Throwing Sheep in the Boardroom" provides an interesting survey of the issues, and was an inspiration for this session. But working musicians have long known the importance of knowing (and impressing) the "right people" in order to get work. Have social networks changed fundamentally since the advent of Web 2.0, or were they always there, and just a little harder to visualise when held in a pocket diary, rather than displayed on a Facebook wall?
    • Total war and its effects on the live music industry in Cheshire and North Wales

      Southall, Helen; University of Chester (University of Chester, 2014-10-03)
      Given the profound effect which World War II had on the economy of the UK as a whole, it would be surprising if specific areas of that economy – such as live music in the provinces – were not affected as well. How did ‘total war’ affect the live music industry on a local level? Evidence I have collected for a study of musicians active in and around Chester during the period suggests that the large number of military bases in the area, combined with the effects of other wartime factors such as conscription, rationing and the need to maintain both military and civilian morale, did indeed affect the size and nature of the market for live dance music locally. For instance, the large US Air Force base at Burtonwood was a source of work for local musicians, as well as an opportunity to mix with American musicians and music fans. As well as presenting information obtained through interviews with musicians and their relatives, I will also look briefly at what happened to the musicians and the bands after the war, when economic and social conditions changed again, at the same time as advances occurred in music-related technology.
    • Touching the ineffable: Collective creative collaboration, education and the secular-spiritual in performing arts

      Jamieson, Evelyn; University of Chester (Intellect Ltd., 2014-06-01)
      This article considers a range of spiritual, psychological and pedagogical writing to examine whether the contemporary notion of ‘secular-spirituality’ can move forward our understanding of collaborative working processes in the performing arts. With reference to Anttila, Bigger, Bini, Czikszentmihalyi, Lave and Wenger, James, Roff, and Van Ness, the article focuses on the rehearsal room interplay of life world and social world through three key notions. These are ‘embodied knowing’, ‘bodily intelligence’ and ‘belonging’ in relation to the individual in the wider collaborative process. Some working practices of Forced Entertainment – as discussed by Tim Etchells – are then considered as a concluding and practice-based referent.
    • Translating and Understanding: pre-text based drama

      Owens, Allan; University of Chester (Draamatayo, 2015-01)
      Pre-text based process drama operates in part through a process characterised by the notion of good friction. This chapter is used to suggest that this process is more concerned with concepts of translation and understanding than explaining away or meaning making.
    • Tsalani bwino

      Loudon, Jane; University College Chester (Routledge, 2005)
      This article discusses the author's working relationships with One Hope World and SOS Children's Village in Malawi between 1999-2004.
    • Turning to Learning: Organising Reflection and Creating Space for Reflexive Practices via Arts Based Initiatives

      Passila, A.; Owens, Allan; Sproedt, Henrik; University of Lapeenranta, University of Chester (2015-07-02)
      The purpose of this study is concerned with ‘inclusive growth’ (Europe2020) in the sense of having a clear agenda to develop new skills and jobs as well as new skills for new jobs. We draw on research into conceptualisations of new leadership and management such as Eraut, M. (2000) Non-formal learning and tacit knowledge in professional work. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 70, pp. 113–136; Raelin, J. (2004) Don't bother putting leadership into people. Academy of Management Perspectives August 1, vol. 18 no. 3 pp.131-135; Raelin, J. (2007) Academy of Management Perspectives December 1, 2007 vol. 6 no. 4 pp. 495-519. Our contribution is to discuss innovation potential through the idea of creating a broader participatory orientation where employees, managers, stakeholders, customers/end users and scholar’s needs, expertise and views can be utilized to develop new practices and ways of organizing reflection (Vince 2002; Pässilä & Vince, forthcoming; Vince & Reynolds 2009) and creating space for reflexive practices (Antonacopoulou 2004; Cotter 2014; Pässilä et. al 2013).
    • What's in a name?

      Harrop, Peter; University of Chester (Intellect, 2005)
      This article takes an impressionistic and loosely comparative overview of British and American Performance Studies provision based on a small sample of university prospectus and website entries as well as conversations with teachers. This material is then examined in the light of recent publication in the field, raising issues of the relationship between Theatre Studies and Performance Studies, writing and embodied knowledge, practice and theory, in an attempt to see what the Performance Studies project might be becoming. It suggests a distinct British conception of Performance Studies, occasionally drawing on the ‘broad spectrum’ North American model while retaining active curricular engagement with the processes of performance making.