• Performing PREVENT: Anti-extremist Theatre-in-Education in the Service of UK Counter-Terrorism, a Freirean Analysis

      Piasecka, Shelley; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2019-05-24)
      This article reveals a new trend in UK counter-terrorism: the emergence of anti-extremist Theatre-in-Education (TIE) to deliver counter-terrorism projects in schools and colleges. Using Paulo Freire’s vision of critical and dialogic pedagogy, I offer an analysis of anti-extremist TIE against a backdrop of PREVENT, the UK counter-terrorism strategy. The September 11 attack, the London Transport bombings and the more recent attacks in Europe and the UK have contributed to a strengthening of counter-terrorism measures in all spheres of public life. In 2015, the UK government introduced a statutory duty for education providers to prevent young people from being drawn into terrorism. This is known as the PREVENT Duty. The implementation of the duty has not been without controversy, with commentators noting a disproportionate focus on Islamist forms of terrorism. My study has shown that the guiding principle of TIE to enact social change is threatened in this climate, whilst maintaining the possibility of engaging young people in meaningful dialogue about terrorism and violent extremism.
    • Presenting an absence

      Smith, Kate M. (Chester College, 1995)
      This article reflects upon the themes of blackness and whiteness, and presence and absence in a production of Our country's good by Timerblake Wertenbaker made by students in the Department of Drama & Theatre Studies at Chester College.
    • ‘Proxemic Interaction in Popular Music Recordings’

      Dockwray, Ruth; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-01-01)
      This paper discusses sonic spatialization and the notion of proxemics in recorded tracks. Spatialization or rather the spatial characteristics and positioning of sounds within a track, can directly influence the way a listener can formulate their own interpretation. Through the analysis of proxemic zones within the context of the ‘sound-box’, their impact in terms of interpersonal distance and listener engagement will be discussed along with potential meanings.
    • Questioning through Doing: Shaping Praxis through the Individual Dance Project

      Sarco-Thomas, Malaika; University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-04-27)
      How might flow theory explain dancers’ experience of technique class? Can auditory learning stimulate a deeper understanding of tap dance? How does “play” build group cohesion in improvisation? These and other questions can spark undergraduate dance research. Artistic research at the undergraduate level creates an opportunity for students to exercise a range of skills as scholars, facilitators and performers. This case study will look at the Individual Dance Project (IDP) as integral to the Bachelor (Honors) in Dance Studies course offered by the University of Malta’s School of Performing Arts as an example of high-impact teaching where students are guided and challenged to build unique projects which investigate a phenomenon in both theory and practice.
    • Rattling- Arts Based Initiatives in learning and transformation

      Owens, Allan; Passila, Anne (IKAM, 2015-06-10)
      This track explores the process of arts-based initiatives, ABIs, (Schiuma, 2011; 2013) in the context of practice-based innovation (Melkas & Harmaakorpi, 2012). According to Schiuma (2011, pp. 2–3), an ABI is the planned managerial use of art forms to address management challenges and business problems with the aim of developing employees and infrastructure that affect the organizational value-creation capacity. ABIs integrate the traditional rational-based perspective of the organization with the emotive-based perspective of organizational life and its components. The organizational knowledge creation process depends on the integration of “technical knowledge“ with emotive knowledge. The arts provide approaches and innovation action tools to handle emotional and evocative dynamics within and around organizations.
    • Reaching from Behind: Sillamae

      Owens, Allan; University of Chester, Cumbria Local Education Authority (ETV National Estonian Television, 2014-11-18)
      ETV (Estonian Television National Channel) Interviewer and Arts Commentator Andrus Vaariku asks ‘Can Theatre Change the World?’ An Estonian National TV documentary focusing on three artists in three contexts: Contemporary Performance Practitioner Ene-Liis Semper, Applied Drama Practitioners Allan Owens & Katrin Nielsen ‘Hidden town: Silamae and Hendrik Toompere illusioonl Ugala Theatre Director UGALA.
    • Returning Pretext

      Owens, Allan; Yamani, H.; University of Bethlehem (2017-01-26)
      In the ‘Right to Return Pre-text’ we travel back in time to the year 1967 when Israel opened the border for the first time in 20 years to Palestinians who fled in 1948. Husband and wife Said and Sofia are arguing in their living room in Ramallah, Palestine about whether or not they should take this chance to visit the house for which they still have the key, but which Israelis would now surely be living in. Finally on a sweltering hot June day they set out in their old grey Fiat to make the journey to Haifa to face the un-faceable. Based on Ghassan Kanafani’s (1936-1972) novella ‘Returning to Haifa’ this pre-text explores the consequences of political and military occupation from a deeply human perspective. A series of questions are posed through three scenes that take participants from the known in to profoundly de-stabilising unknown territories.
    • Sensible Sensitivity: Arts Pedagogy in Management Development

      Passila, A.; Owens, Allan; Lapeenranta University of Technology; University of Chester (Kogan Page, 2016-03-03)
      This chapter introduces the distinctive forms of practice and discourse that arts pedagogy can offer when applied in management development and education.
    • Sevenfold Fugue for Solo Organ

      Sproston, Darren; University of Chester (Darren Sproston, 2015-03-01)
      Commissioned by the University of Chester for its 175th Founders’ Day Service. First performed at Chester Cathedral, March 2015 by Graham Eccles.
    • Sharing something

      Owens, Allan (Chester College, 1995)
      This article discusses events leading up to and a performance of "After the ball is over" at Howard House, HM Prison Styal in Cheshire during July 1994.
    • Site, Sight, Cite: (Re)Making Locational Identity through Walking and Performance

      Layton, James R.; Molony, Richard; University of Chester (2015-04-16)
      In August 2014, James Layton, Richard Molony and Julian Waite (University of Chester) conceived and presented a participatory performance titled (V)-Is-it Chester?, in which spectators were invited on a walking tour of Chester city centre, reimagining its history and present day reality. Currently, Layton and Molony are using the seeds of this performance to curate a community project that employs participatory performance and walking art practice as a means of engaging a range of Chester residents in the arts. The participants will be invited to make connections between their own identities and familiar locations, thus foregrounding autobiographical and non-rational associations (Smith, 2010). Through the (re)exploration of locational identities, Site, Sight, Cite aims to raise awareness of and engagement in the arts in Chester as the city's new arts centre moves towards completion in 2016. Site, Sight, Cite aims to work with participants in creating their own personal histories of the city. In doing so, the project draws upon notions of 'sited community' (Kwon 2004); performative walking (Smith, 2010; 2014; Heddon, 2012; Mock, 2009), mythogeography (Wrights & Sites, 2006; 2010), and relational aesthetics (Bourriaud, 2002). In this paper, the authors offer a prognosis for the future of the arts in Chester and how, through engaging the city's denizens in walking art practice, locational identity can be (re)examined and (re)evaluated.
    • Sonic Proxemics and the Art of Persuasion: An Analytical Framework

      Collins, Karen; Dockwray, Ruth; University of Waterloo; University of Chester (MIT Press, 2015-12-07)
      This paper introduces a framework for the creation and analysis of sonic spatialization and proxemics in audiovisual media. The authors apply the framework to three public service announcements to show how sonic proxemics can be used as a rhetorical device that may be used to strengthen political aims.
    • Stone Tapes: Ghost Box, Nostalgia and Postwar Britain

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2016-03-10)
      Book Chapter
    • Taking the Studio by Strategy

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Continuum, 2016-08-11)
      Book chapter
    • Tamaglitchi

      Collins, Karen; Dockwray, Ruth (ACM Press, 2018)
    • The Arrival of Godot: Beckett, Cultural Memory and 1950s British Theatre

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Bloomsbury Methuen, 2016-06-30)
      Book chapter
    • The artificial body: Speaking through stammers and silences

      Smith, Kate M. (Chester College, 1996)
      This article, originally delivered at the Body memory in performance conference at Lancaster University in August 1995, discusses some of the observed phenomena in rehearsal processes towards the performance of the damaged and dismembered bodies that inhabit Caryl Churchill and David Lan's A mouthful of birds (Methuen, 1986) and Timberlake Wertenbaker's The love of the nightgale (Faber & Faber, 1989).
    • The Bogus Men: Eno, Ferry and Roxy Music

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Continuum, 2016-08-11)
      Book chapter.
    • The Events: Immanence and the Audience

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (de Gruyter, 2016-05-12)
      David Greig’s The Events (2013) stages the aftermath of a traumatic event; a cleric tries to come to terms with the massacre of her multicultural choir. The play uses two actors (one playing the cleric, and the other playing all the other main roles, including that of the killer). The cast, however, also includes a choir, drawn from the town where the show is being performed: the choir sings, and takes on small speaking roles (reading their lines from the script). They also serve as an audience for the action, occupying tiered seating at the back of the stage. The choir serves as a powerful reminder of what Laura Cull, in Theatres of Immanence: Deleuze and the Ethics of Performance (2012) identifies as Deleuzian immanence: a performance which stages “the participation, multiplication and extension of the human body – understood as that which is produced by relations of force and encounters with the affects of other bodies” (10). In this article, I argue that the strong affect generated by the play in performance stems mainly from the positioning of the choir, the performers and the audience as, simultaneously, participants and witnesses to trauma; and from the immanent relation of actors, choir and audience within the structure of the performance event.
    • Through the lens of Kaleidoscopic Pedagogy- collective imagining of democratic forms of being.

      Passila, A.; Owens, Allan; LUT University (Lahti- Lappeenranta) (Xamk, 2018-11-08)
      This chapter focuses on Kaleidoscopic Pedagogy as a conceptual frame of arts based method applied to a discussion and collective imagining of democratic forms of being with young people, artists, art pedagogues and researchers. The background of KP is a problem identified by one of the founding theorist of critical pedagogy Henry A. Giroux (2014a), which is that democracy has been sullied as a concept – as a ´service` - and no longer offers the promise of emancipation (Giroux, 2014b). The discussion, therefore, is about understandings of democracy: what it might look like and how it would feel to be in it according to young people themselves.