• The Arrival of Godot: Beckett, Cultural Memory and 1950s British Theatre

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Bloomsbury Methuen, 2016-06-30)
      Book chapter
    • The artificial body: Speaking through stammers and silences

      Smith, Kate M. (Chester College, 1996)
      This article, originally delivered at the Body memory in performance conference at Lancaster University in August 1995, discusses some of the observed phenomena in rehearsal processes towards the performance of the damaged and dismembered bodies that inhabit Caryl Churchill and David Lan's A mouthful of birds (Methuen, 1986) and Timberlake Wertenbaker's The love of the nightgale (Faber & Faber, 1989).
    • Before and After Eno: Situating ‘The Recording Studio as Compositional Tool

      Albiez, Sean; Dockwray, Ruth; Southampton Solent University; University of Chester (Bloomsbury, 2016-08-11)
      This chapter discusses Eno's work and lecture - Studio as a Compositional Tool. As previous studies have identified the importance of John Cage and post-Cageian experimental music for Eno, this study extends the flows of influence and counter-influence back to the second decade of the twentieth century, and situates Eno's Studio as a Compositional Tool lecture in the long history of twentieth century avant-garde and modernist debates concerning the future of music and the potential recording technologies afford. Therefore, the fundamental purpose of this study is to contextualise and situate the lecture in a way that has not been attempted previously. This will allow a broader understanding of ‘The Recording Studio as Compositional Tool’ as a dialogic, heteroglossic text that is in conversation with and channels the voices of others who, in the previous seven decades, had already considered and formulated responses to issues that Eno addressed at the end of the 1970s.
    • The Bogus Men: Eno, Ferry and Roxy Music

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Continuum, 2016-08-11)
      Book chapter.
    • Borders of knowledge: A reflection on a collaborative international drama project

      Layton, James R.; Loudon, Jane; University of Chester (2014-10-24)
      Iris Marion Young (1990) believes that the ideal of community “seeks to resist the individualism and alienation that is pervasive in late capitalist societies by bringing people together”. Illustrated by an ongoing collaborative drama project between the UK and Romania, this paper seeks to explore the way in which access to knowledge associated with a late capitalist UK and those of the emerging capitalism of Romania informs creative partnerships. Using a case study of 2014 field research in Romania involving UK Drama & Theatre Studies undergraduates, this paper offers a multi-voiced reflection on how we learn from other communities and build sustainable and balanced relationships in an ever-expanding European community.
    • Chorale Prelude: Lord for the Years for Solo Organ

      Sproston, Darren; University of Chester (Darren Sproston, 2015-03-01)
      Commissioned by the University of Chester for its 175th Founders’ Day Service. First performed at Chester Cathedral, March 2015 by Graham Eccles.
    • Collaborative Practice: some thoughts

      Jamieson, Evelyn (The Higher Education Academcy: Palatine, Dance, Drama and Music, 2011)
      A snapshot paper concerning values, approaches and modes of practice in higher education performing arts. This paper is contained in the 2011 report, Collaborative Arts Practices in HE: Mapping and Developing Pedgagogical Models by Christophe Alix, Elizabeth Dobson, Robert Wilsmore.
    • Creativity and Democracy in Education: Practices and politics of learning through the arts

      Adams, Jeff; Owens, Allan; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-07-16)
      With particular reference to the practices and politics of learning through the arts this book (Research Monograph) forms part of the Routledge Research in Education Policy and Politics series aims to enhance our understanding of key challenges and facilitate on-going academic debate within the influential and growing field of Education Policy and Politics.
    • Critical Reflection and the arts as third spaces

      Lehikoinen, Kai; Passila, Anne; Owens, Allan; University of Arts Helsinki, Lapeenranta University of Technology, university of Chester (2015-04-08)
      The paper discusses critical reflection in the context of the arts as Third Space (TS). It scrutinises TS as an artistically co-created conceptual, physical and egalitarian site for transdisciplinary dialogue and informal learning and also a means to advance the democracy of learning – especially critical reflection. The focus is on theatre-pedagogic ways to set up participatory performative learning arrangements as TS. The analysis addresses examples drawn from an arts-based learning practice called Learning Jam (LJ) that was organized in Copenhagen Business School in August 2014. In the transdisciplinary event, approximately forty artists, researchers, art-educators, managers and arts-based consultants used an artistic inquiry process to explore the topic of transformation. Organised as a jam in the sense of jazz music, the LJ encouraged the participants to improvise collectively in order to move beyond the known and co-create new knowledge through practice in collaboration between practitioners and academics
    • Culture, Politics and Drama Education: The Creative Agenda 1997-2015

      Piasecka, Shelley; University of Chester (National Drama Publications, 2016-05-07)
      In the years following New Labour’s election victory (1997) the creative agenda was a visible concern for schools and teachers. A number of influential documents and policy documents were launched to promote creativity in schools. New funding opportunities had been made available to support teachers and classroom learning, most notably the Arts Council initiative Creative Partnerships (2002). Buckingham and Jones (2001) describe the period as the “Cultural Turn” towards the creative and cultural industries. Paradoxically, the creative agenda emerged at a time when teachers experienced unprecedented levels of control over, and public scrutiny of, their everyday working lives; it was a period of time dominated by a ‘bureaucratisation” of education. For Stronach et al. (2002) it was a rise of a performativity discourse in response to the audit culture. Post 2010, the introduction of school performance measures, such as the compulsory English Baccalaureate (2015), offers another kind of performativity discourse, but from a perspective other than creativity. The long-term outlook for creative subjects appears bleak, particularly for dance and drama. This article examines the period 1997-2015 with reference to Neelands and Choe’s (2010) assertion that creativity is a cultural and political idea.
    • Dance bands in Chester (1930 - 1970) : An evolving professional network

      Southall, Helen; University of Chester (2011-09)
      Headings are: the city of Chester; a hidden history; jazz places; economic places; social networks; methodology and findings.
    • Decisions

      Owens, Allan (Chester College, 1996)
      This article discusses decisions - a process drama created to explore the concept of ethical decision making - which ran in October 1996 as part of the Decade of Evangelism mission run by the Chester and Wakefield dioceses. The project focused on the sharing of faith (in particular Christian beliefs relating to forgiveness), taking real risks, and changing attitudes.
    • Dissolving into Scotland: National Identity in Dunsinane and The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart.

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2016-03-03)
      Journal article
    • Drama and the global dimension

      Owens, Allan; University of Chester (Trenthan Books, 2009)
      This book chapter discusses drama activities that a primary school could use to inform pupils of the global dimension of drama.
    • Dramworks: Planning drama, creating practical structures, developing drama pretexts

      Owens, Allan; Barber, Keith; University College Chester ; Victoria Community High School, Crewe (Carel Press, 1997)
      This book focuses on planning drama, creating practical structures and developing drama pretexts. Methods of reflecting on and evaluating the work are built into the pretexts.
    • Drive, Speed and Narrative in the Soundscapes of Racing Games

      Collins, Karen; Dockwray, Ruth; University of Waterloo; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-06-01)
      This chapter argues that racing games are situated in a space between reality and fantasy: a cinematic realism, or “cine-real". At the heart of the auditory cine-realism is a use of sound and music to both fill a gap left by the lack of sensory information presented to the player, and as part of a narrative device. The authors also argue that the narrative use of music and sound in racing games is one of the key features that distinguishes racing games from straight simulations.
    • Echo of dreams

      Owens, Allan; Green, Naomi; University of Chester, NEC Katayanagi Institute (2015-04)
      The Echo of Dreams Pre-text allows for consideration of sudden changes in life, the unpredictable , unforeseen and unknowable to create a space for the exchange of such understandings and to allow for a celebration of the human spirit in the face of loss
    • The Events: Immanence and the Audience

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (de Gruyter, 2016-05-12)
      David Greig’s The Events (2013) stages the aftermath of a traumatic event; a cleric tries to come to terms with the massacre of her multicultural choir. The play uses two actors (one playing the cleric, and the other playing all the other main roles, including that of the killer). The cast, however, also includes a choir, drawn from the town where the show is being performed: the choir sings, and takes on small speaking roles (reading their lines from the script). They also serve as an audience for the action, occupying tiered seating at the back of the stage. The choir serves as a powerful reminder of what Laura Cull, in Theatres of Immanence: Deleuze and the Ethics of Performance (2012) identifies as Deleuzian immanence: a performance which stages “the participation, multiplication and extension of the human body – understood as that which is produced by relations of force and encounters with the affects of other bodies” (10). In this article, I argue that the strong affect generated by the play in performance stems mainly from the positioning of the choir, the performers and the audience as, simultaneously, participants and witnesses to trauma; and from the immanent relation of actors, choir and audience within the structure of the performance event.
    • Experimental Sound Mixing for “The Well”, a Short Film Made for Tablets

      Dockwray, Ruth; Collins, Karen; University of Chester; University of Waterloo (MIT Press, 2017-06-16)
      This article presents an overview of the use of binaural recording and experimental headphone mixing for a short film. Drawing loosely on theories of proxemics, the article illustrates how sound mixing can be used to create a unique subjective perspective. In particular, the authors sought to experiment with and to use the peculiarities of stereo headphone mixing and binaural sound to reinforce visual elements of a film designed for horizontal viewing on tablets.
    • Fishing in Puddles, Place and Space in Performance Research

      Piasecka, Shelley; University of Chester (Wiley & Sons, 2014-07-21)
      This article examines the significance of place and space from a Performance Studies and Social Studies perspective. In terms of the social sciences, I draw upon the formal, symbolic and marginal articulation of place. Hetherington suggests that certain places act as focal point for the establishment of social identities, citing city-centre landmarks and shopping malls. Similarly, children attach all kinds of values to the formal spaces they occupy. As one example of this point, I examine the child’s relationship to the school hall. From the perspective of performance, I examine a project undertaken at a junior school in Stoke-on-Trent, inspired by the site work of Wrights & Sites. As a critical lens, I adopt Boal’s understanding of the oneiric dimension. The oneiric dimension is particularly relevant in performance work as these are the moments when we (as performers and spectators) are pulled into the action. In these instances, the physical space simply disappears, imagination replaces actuality and the desire to believe outweighs the reality of the present.